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Full text of "Antioch News 01/03/1992"

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Modern love bridges age 

gap, wedding trends, 

honeymoons, and more, 

See pull out section 




en 
Chernobyl 



Rotary International 

lends helping hand to 

kids of cataclysm. 

Seepage 13 



Chernobyl.' 

•rustcn 

hl " Kiev*;- 

Vasilhov, 



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Tr.nr 1 




resolutions 



T1TIWMIiWini«'.i.jl..T'ri| .It. ■■].-!■ 



i steps to improve the 
quality of the environment in 
1992. 

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See Page 10 




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-L , ! \*J V V KJ -BL'L^L/ ANB757 10/28/92 **r-s L 






S ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 
J 757 



VOL. 106-NO. 1 



ANTIOCH, JANUARY 3, 1992 



TWOSEQ 



757 MAIN STREET 
Antioch 



IL 66002 



'Publication 



COPY 



Electrical grounding may be culprit in pipe rot 



by DOUG DUSIK 
Lakeland Newspapers 

When the Antioch Public Works DepL 
repaired the rust problem in Rose 
Robinson's water, they stumbled across a 
bigger dilemma. 

It appeared that the electrical grounding 
to the home's water pipes — used at many 
other residences in the Village — caused 



the pipe to corrode and be eaten away. 

Presently, the Village is repairing 
water mains in the Oakwood Knolls 
subdivision, and Public Works Director 
Mike Ruxton said he thinks the problem 
is the same as Robinson's on Hillside 
Ave. — grounded water pipes. 

Ruxton guessed that a majority of 
Antioch homes have their electrical 



supply grounded to water pipes. 

Zoning ordinances prevent any new 
construction to follow the practice,, but 
Ruxton said he wants the Village Board to 
enforce the owners of older homes to 
reground their electrical supplies. ,, 

Otherwise, he said, Antioch will be 
spending a lot of money replacing water 
pipes in the future. 




The problem appears to be attributed to 
electrolysis. An electrical supply is 
grounded to prevent shock from any 
straying electric current 
■ ■ Usually, a ground is some metal object 
buried into the ground, such as a lightning 
rod. 

In the case of Antioch, where the metal 
objects are water pipes, the straying 
electrical current is causing electrolysis to 
occur to the pipes. The effect is similar to 
the reaction salt has on metal: — 
oxidation, corrosion and deterioration. 

The solution, according to Ruxton, is 
to disconnect the electric ground from the 
pipes and reconnect it to a grounding rod. 

Robinson said she had this done by an 
electrician for $50. .The electrician 
connected her ground to an 8-foot section 
of rod outside of the home. 

The Village Board has told Ruxton 
they want to look at oilicK| v vm »8£^, 
ordinances before enacting requ^SSP^fi^piwr? 
for Antioch. 1 < 

Ruxton said this WA ^fit ystm. £ \ ■ L : i n °* 
see Antioch be 2 lecher in requiring proper 
grounds for older homes. 

Robinson, meanwhile, said she has not 
seen any more rust in her water. 

Over the last few years, rust-stained 
water has intermittently entered her home 
and mined her laundry. 

Originally, the Village contended 
Robinson's problem was an isolated case 
of being at the end of the water main. 

But work in late November revealed the 
corroded pipes. 



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Main street's regaining spot in the sun 

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Artist lends vision to tile 

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Taking the goou with the bad 

•0bituaries..............M.....18 

•Classified .........18-25 

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Lancer women face tough test 



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Sanctuary of natural peace 

The clip, clop and rumble of a horse pulling a wagon are gone but there Is still this 
place, easy on the eye and out of a quieter, gentler past, where the rural lifestyle 
and wilderness exist side by side offering insight and inspiration. Photo by Lisa 

Benitez 




Newspapers 




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eland Newspapers 




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gap, wedding trends 
honeymoons, and more. 

See pull out section 



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;^i ^. 



Rotary International 

lends helping hand to 

kids of cataclysm. 



Chernobyl.").' 

■ W 

hl * Kiev*; 

VasilKov. • 



See Page 13 



'Eco-resolutions' 

-L-jwi_i.'..'..'t!;na.jjiif-jUfiiiiiu!;F.jj-i.iUi- » « 

Take steps to improve the 

quality of tlie environment in 

1992. 



See Page 10 



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VOL 1 06-NO. 1 



ANTIOCH, JANUARY 3, 1992 



TWO SEG 



AN0757 10/28/92 

ANTIOCH TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 

757 MAIN STREET 

attach IL 60002 



' Publication 

* - . . *** ■ • 

COPY 



Electrical grounding may be culprit in pipe rot 



by DOUG DUSIK 
Lakeland Newspapers 

When the Antioch Public Works Dept, 
repaired the rust problem in Rose 
Robinson's water, they stumbled across a 
bigger dilemma. 

It appeared that the electrical grounding 
to me home's water pipes — used at many 
other residences in the Village — caused 



the pipe to corrode and be eaten away. 

Presently* the Village is repairing 
water mains in the Oakwood Knolls 
subdivision, and Public Works Director 
Mike Ruxton said he thinks the problem 
is the same as Robinson's on Hillside 
Ave. — grounded water pipes. 

Ruxton guessed that a majority of 
Antioch homes have their electrical 



supply grounded to water pipes. 

Zoning ordinances prevent any new 
construction to follow the practice,, but 
Ruxton said he wants the Village Board to 
enforce the owners of older homes to 
reground their electrical supplies. 

Otherwise, he said, Antioch will be 
spending a lot of money replacing water 
pipes in the future. 




The problem appears to be attributed to 
electrolysis. An electrical supply is 
grounded to prevent shock from any 
straying electric current 

Usually, a ground is some metal object 
buried into the ground, such as a lightning 
rod. 

In the case of Antioch, where the metal 
objects are water pipes, the straying 
electrical current is causing electrolysis to 
occur to the pipes. The effect is similar to 
the reaction salt has on metal: — 
oxidation, corrosion and deterioration. 

The solution, according to Ruxton, is 
to disconnect the electric ground from the 
pipes and reconnect it to a grounding rod. 

Robinson said she had this done by an 
electrician for $50. The electrician 
connected her ground to an 8-foot section 
of rod outside of the home. 

The Village Board has told Ruxton 
they want to look at otherl-V 111 *^ 
ordinances before enacting rcqoȣS?*S2i F Tf < 
for Antioch. | / 

see Antioch be £ leaiSerin requiring proper 
grounds for older homes. 

Robinson, meanwhile, said she has not 
seen any more rust in her water. 

Over the last few years, rust-stained 
water has intermittenUy entered her home 
and ruined her laundry. 

Originally, the Village contended 
Robinson's problem was an isolated case 
of being at the end of the water main. 

But work in late November revealed the 
corroded pipes. 



i 



m 



-.. 








*liCutorisit«ii«itMt»«ti»t>»»«MO'"y 

Main street's regaining spot in the sun 

•Business......... ...11-12 

Artist lends vision to tile 

Taking the gcou with the bad 

•0bituaries..........^.........l8 

•Classifled..,..............18-25 

•Sports.. ....♦..»♦. ••••••••••Zy-ou 

Lancer women face tough test 



• ■ •■ ■ 



Sanctuary of natural peace 

The clip, clop and rumble of a horse pulling a wagon are gone but there is still this 
place, easy on the eye and out of a quieter, gentler past, where the rural lifestyle 
and wilderness exist side by side offering insight and inspiration. Photo by Lisa 
Benitez 




Newspapers 




:<■ 



Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



..mi „j. i_-.-. ii .. i,. ' 



Tis the season to catch the flu 



Between now and the 
end of April, healthcare 
workers predict thousands of 
Lake County residents will 
be hit by the flu. Although 
symptoms such as achy 

muscles and low-grade tem- 
peratures can seem routine, 
the flu (or influenza) 
shouldn't be taken lightly. 

Reports from the Centers of 
Disease Control in Atlanta 
show flu as the sixth lead- 
ing cause of death in the 
United States. 

With the prospect of a 
heavy flu season facing 
Lake County, Donna Hall, 
director of Infection Control 



at Victory Memorial Hos- 
pital, discussed the disease 
and its current outbreak. 

What exactly is influ- 
enza? 

Influenza or flu is a 
virus.. It affects the respira- 
tory system and is often ac- 
companied by muscle aches, 
fever and cough. There are 
three types of influenza — A, 
B, and C. Influenza Type A 
is the most serious and 
widespread of the diseases. 
Experts at the Centers for 
Disease Control feel that 
Type A will predominate 
during the 1991-92 flu sea- 
son. 



Who is most likely to 
contract the disease? 

Anyone can contract the 
flu. It spreads quickly and 
the virus is transported 

though the air in droplets 
when people cough and 
sneeze. The virus is also 
left on objects that come in 

contact with an affected 
person's hands, nose and 
mouth. That is why we are 

encouraged to get vaccinated 
and are warned to stay out 
of busy shopping malls and 
other crowded, enclosed ar- 
eas if we are run down or 
otherwise more susceptible 
to the disease. 



Who is at most risk 
from influenza? 

If you are under age 65 
and generally in good 
health, the flu shouldn't do 
more than keep you home 
from work for from two to 
seven days. However, older 
adults, people with heart 
and pulmonary disease, nur- 
sing home patients and the 
chronically ill should take 
precautions against contrac- 
ting the disease. These in- 
clude being vaccinated 
against the flu each year, 
staying out of crowded, en- 
closed areas, getting plenty 
of rest and generally taking 
good care of your health. It 



is also important for health- 
care workers to follow these 
precautions since they work 
in close contact with people 
who arc susceptible to the 
flu. 

When should someone 
contact their doctor? 

If you are in the high 
risk group for the flu , you 
should contact your doctor 
when you first notice flu 
symptoms. However, as I 
said before, most people 
will recover with a few days 
of bed rest. On the other 
hand, you should call your 
doctor immediately if you 
experience difficulty breath- 



ing, begin wheezing, vomit 
or cough up blood, or if 
your fever lasts more than 
three days. And, of course, 
should you have any reason 
for concern, call your doc- 
tor. If you don't have a 
family doctor, you can call 
the free Victory Physician 
Referral Service at (708) 
360-4101. The service is 
open. Monday through Fri- 
day, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 
p.m. In the event of a flu- 
related emergency, Victory 
Memorial's Emergency De- 
partment is open 24 hours a 
day. You can speak to an 
emergency nurse by calling 
(708)360-4181. 



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Yesterday's Treasures: a touch of primitive pasts 



by ELLEN RUTLIN 
Lakeland Newspapers 

It was just a matter of 
buying their first antique 
piece in California and the 
Garners admit they were 
hooked. 

"The more you look, the 
more you see the more you 
like," Laurie Gamer, ex- 
plained. She is co-owner of 
Yesterday's Treasures 
antique shop in Wauconda 
with hei husband Joe Gamer 
rfeefid Frank Robinson. 

The shop opened Septem- 



ber 



fain St. 



specializing in porcelaili, i 
depression glass and primi- 
tive furniture. 

1,050-square-fcet of an- 
tiques including a primitive 
child's wheel barrow from 
England, pine cabinets and 
rustic crates await 
'antiqucrs.' 

"We don't look for the or- 
nate Victorian style," she 
said. "We have some ma- 
hogany and art deco pieces 
but we mostly carry simpler 
pieces. 

"Old things have so much 
more character. They have a 
history and at times you can 
learn their past when you 
strip away their layers." 



Yesterday's Treasures is 
"really different" with its 
selection of pieces from the 
U.S. and .England. 

All antique pieces are 
marked down as low as 
possible to eliminate bar- 
gaining with customers. 
Yesterday's Treasures also 
offers a referral service for 
customers seeking help in 
having a piece of furniture 
delivered or refinished. 

A wish book for collec- 
tors seeking a specific item 
is also generating at the 
an easy way to 
have someone else search 
for a long sought treasure to 
add to a collection. 

The Gamers began their 
hobby as private collector's 

a few years ago when lived 

they lived on the east coast 

by attending auctions, and 

treasure hunting at garage 

sales. 

"It's so much fun to find a 



good bargain. The more you 
look the more you learn and 
you become able to pick 
out a bargain and find a 
good piece." 

While Laurie collected ' 
glassware and old fashioned 
spools her husband fancied 
collecting tobacco related 
pieces. 

"The more you go to 
shows and different places, 
the more you get involved," 
Gamer said. "It just esca- 
lated into opening a shop." 



Yesterday's Treasures car- 
ries a full line of candles to 
fit antique spools, jams and 
jellies from Door County 
and for the holidays a lim- 
ited edition line of Santas. 

The Gamers moved to 
Barrington four years ago 
when they decided to open 
their own business. They 
looked at different locations 
in Lake County before set- 
tling on Wauconda. 

"We were looking for 
| something in the local area. 



DOUBLE D. CERAMICS 

Day & Evening 
Classes 

•Greenware •Firing 
•Supplies 

DIANE ULRICH Certified Teacher 

...Bring a Friend! 
708-526-8629 

Call For Class Time Island Lake 





To find out how 

you can advertise 

your business in this 

monthly section, call 

your Classified 

Ad- Visor today at 

(708) 223-8161 



Grayslake 

Antiques 

& 

Colleetables 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake. Illinois 
Illinois 120 & U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. -4 p.m. 

SUNDAY January 
12,1992 

Admission $2.00 




DUFFY'S ATTIC 

Antiques & Collectibles 

Anything from Custard Glass 

to Cannon Balls 

Buy & Sell 

Estates Purchased 

Clock Repair • Lamp Rewiring 

22 Center Street, Grayslake 

(708) 223-7454 

ReOpening Jan. 7, 1992 

Tues.-Sat. 11 :00 am - 5:00 pm; 

Sun. 12:00 noon-4:00 pm 



eST 



Ta xn^^ru/HvT^ nWT 



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MARY'S CRAFTS DBA 

Al's Paint &c Wallcoverings 
All Total Merchandise from 

25% Off 

Books • Seasonal Pics • Acrylics 

• Macrame' Cord • 

Sale Positively Ends January 15 

3448 Sheridan Rd., Zion, IL 

(708) 872-4765 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



UK/UO) O/Z-4/OO 



CLEARANCE SALE! 
SAVE 10% - 50% OFF SELECTED ITEMS! 

Armstrong's Country 
Connection 

1757 N. Milwaukee, Libertyville, IL 
(Just south of Rte. 137) 

(708) 816-8400 

• Antiques • Jewelry • Linens • Gift Baskets 

• Collectibles • Wreaths • Homemade Candy 
A wide variety of Handcrafted Gifts by local Arlisians 

Consigners Welcome 



la 



1. 



Open Daily 10-6 Sundays 11-5 
Evenings by chance 



IP 



This site just happened to 
come up. We found it as we 
drove through town. . . 
made a couple phone calls 
and moved in," 

Wauconda blossomed re- 
cently with opening of at 
least two other antique 
shops on Main Street in 
addition to the long time 
businesses including 
Whippletree Antiques and 
Country Casuals. 

"It's becoming a nice little 



area for antiqucrs," she said. 
"It seemed to be the ap- 
propriate time and place for 
us to do what we wanted to 
do." 

Open 10 to 5 seven days a 
week. 213 S. Main St. 
Wauconda. 

Customers may mention 
this article to receive 15 
percent off a purchase at 
Yesterday's Treasurer's in 
honor of their grand open- 
ing. 



Super Bowl Weekend Sale at 




CHJedcoi 



vie 



STITCHEKY 

Specializing in Counted Cross Stitch 

HOURS 35 E. Crystal Lake Ave. 

M, T, W, F - 9:30*4:00 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 

TH -9:30-8:00; Sat.-9:30-3:00 (815) 455-5470 



-mv>± 



mmmom* mmm omit * jucw Auwmm 



^** A SPeOAUZED QUILTING & PATCHWORK SHOP 

24417 75th STREET (HWY. 50) 
SALEM (PADDOCK LAKE), WISCONSIN 53168 



GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE , 



\ 100% Cotton Fabrics * Notions • 50 Yard Club • Charm Boxes • Patterns 

Books • Classes ■ Free Demos • Challenges • Quilts • Gifts 

HOURS: TUES. & FR1. 10-8, WED. &THURS, 10-6, SAT. 10-5 

1-414-843-3682 




Computer Show Now With The Great Lake County 

TRAIN & HOBBY MART 

Over 1 00 Train & Hobby Dealers 

Sunday, January 5, 1992 
9 AM -2 PM 

AT THE LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

Rtes. 45 & 120, Grayslake 
Admission $4.00 

FUTURE SHOW: February 2, 1992 

For Dealer Information Call 708-356-2216 
I'HllNlllMIINIIIlllllllllllll^ 



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2 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



At A 
Glance 

Electrical grounding 
may cause pipe rot 

ANTIOCH — Electrical grounding to 
residential water pipes may be causing the 
pipes to corrode and be eaten away, Public 
Works Director Mike Ruxton is contends. 
Ruxton guessed that a majority of 
Antioch homes have their electrical 
supply grounded to water pipes. Zoning 
ordinances prevent any new construction 
to follow the practice, but the public 
works director said he wants the village 
board to require the owners of older homes 
to reground their electrical supplies. 
Otherwise, he said, Antioch will be 
spending a lot of money replacing water 
pipes in the future. 

Grayslake High 
OK's rate hike bid 

GRAYSLAKE— Grayslake voters will 
be deciding on two high school referenda 
issues on the March 17 balloL Grayslake 
Community High School, by split votes, 
have approved referenda bids for the 
education and the building fund. Hie edu- 
cation fund rate would go up by 65 cents 
if the voters approve, while the building 
fund rate would go up 20 cents. The vote 
on the education fund rate was 6-1. with 
Tim Madole casting the no vote. Madole 
and Shirley Chrisilian cast no votes on 
the building fund vote. 

Lake Zurich VA 
goes to Streamwood 

LAKE ZURICH— Former Lake 
Zurich Village Administrator Scott Ratter 
has accepted a position as Personnel 
Director for the Village of Steamwood. 
He begins his new position Jan. 2, 1992. 
Ratter tendered his resignation to the Lake 
Zurich Village Board Dec. 9, 1991 and 
completed his final day with the village 
Dec. 31, 1991. Ratter had served as 
Village Administrator in Lake Zurich for 
17 months. He was the fifth department 




head to resign from the village since June 
1991. Political bantering has been alleged 
in the resignations. Streamwood officials 
said they hired Ratter after a five-month 
national search that drew more than SO 
applicants. He will be a member of the 
bargaining committee that is working on 
new contracts with unions representing 
police and support personnel. 

No dissolve for park 
district this March 

LINDENHURST — Voters will not 
have to decide the fate of the Lindenhurst 
Park DisL this spring. The Lindenhurst 
Watchdog Group has decided not to put 
the issue of dissolving the Park DisL on 
the March ballot. "We have decided at this 
time that we're going to sit back and take 
a wait-and-see approach at our park 
district," said Alan Sandy, a spokesman 
for the Lindenhurst Watchdog Group. 
During a Village Board meeting last 
month, the Watchdog Group charged that 
the 3-year-old park district was wasteful 
and irresponsible, that it had not kept 
promises made to the voters, nor had it 
kept expenses down, nor had it kept 
services proportional to the levels of 
taxation. The group's first attempt to 
dissolve the park district was defeated by 
40 votes. Last November, Gurnee 
attempted a similar referendum, with only 
35 percent of the voters casting a ballot in 
favor of dissolving the Gurnee Park DisL 

Island Lake tax levy 
up by 9.2 percent 

ISLAND LAKE— The Island Lake 
Village Board has approved a $413,295 
tax levy for all corporate purposes, an 
amount 9.2 percent higher than last year. 
The increase is largely due to a rise in the 
cost of provisions required by the state, 
said Patricia Nebgen, village clerk. 
"Social security went up because we have 
more employees," she said. Added during 
the year were two police officers and extra 
public works employees to improve 
village roads. Growth in the village also 
contributed to the increase. 

State reps, park 
celebrate grant 

GRAYSLAKE — Grayslake Commu- 
nity Park Dist. and area legislators made it 
official the day before New Years' Eve.The 
park district, Reps. Robert Churchill (R- 
62) and Virginia Fiester-Frederick (R-59) 
congratulated each other on the park dis- 
trict's receiving a $400,000 grant from the 
Illinois Dept. of Conservation. The funds 
will go towards the 40-acre purchase of 
Central Park. State Sen. David 
Barkhauscn (R-3.0) was also thanked for 
his efforts. 



JURY CASES 



3&TG U5USI1V SSSSBSQ 

without a trial. 



Explore a prompt and 

private settlement before 

you give away 1/3 of your case. 



N E. FINI 

Counselor at Law 



Private personal injury settlements 
1 5% fee only when successful 

15-1 111 

For information or a free consultation 
J 00 North Waukegan Road • Suite 1 03 • Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

B55555"BCiB 




One-third of fees 
paid by homeowners 

LIBERTYVILLE— Trustees and 

school districts signed off on it, but Cook 
County Board candidate F.T. "Mike" 
Graham says it's a bad deal. Graham 
claims Libertyville homeowners will pay 
$316,775 to the schools for Lardeo 
Development's Carriage Hill subdivision 
because of the tax lag, an 18-month 
waiting period for homes to go on the tax 
rolls. Laredo has agreed to pay a total of 
about $217,725 in impact fees and 
developer donations to the school districts, 
the highest ever paid by a Libertyville 
developer. "Growth doesn't pay it's own 
way," Graham said. "I think you have to 
be careful that you don't become greedy or 
otherwise we could end up in a lawsuit," 
said Donald Gossett, Superintendent of 
High School District 128. 

Discount store 
ans clear hurdle 



pi 



GURNEE— Plans for a 16-acre Target 
Greatland store in Gurnee cleared a hurdle 
as the Gurnee Plan Commission gave its 
blessing with a favorable recommendation 



to the village board. Target Greatland, a 
division of Dayton-Hudson Corp. chain 
based in Minneapolis, will be the main 
feature of a 26-acre parcel at the southeast 
corner of Rte. 132 and Hunt Club Rd. The 
land is located across the street from 
Gurnee Mills and a spring, 1993 opening 
is planned. 

Water tower evokes 
controversy 

LAKE ZURICH— The Lake Zurich 
Village Board will decide Jan. 6, whether 
or not to go ahead with plans for the 
construction of a 750-gallon water storage 
trver in Paulus Park. The Community 
Development Committee meeting voted 
3-0 to continue with plans approved 
unanimously by the board in September 
despite the plan commission's 5-2 vote, 
Dec. 4, rejecting the site and exterior 
appearance plans for the storage facility. 
The plan commission report says the site 
plan unreasonably destroys, damages and 
detrimentally modifies and or interferes 
with the enjoyment of significant natural, 
topographical and physical features of the 
park. The water tower is needed to 
increase water supplies and water pressure 
on the northwest side of the village. 





defense 
against a 

eart 



attack is 
a great 

offense. 

Now a thorough 
heart screening 
is just $39. 






Heart disease is a lough competitor. Every 32 seconds it 
claims another life-making it the number one cause of death 
in America. 

Fortunately, you have a good defense against a heart attack: 
prevention through earfy detection. That's why, as a special 
service to this community, the Heart Center ol Lake County 
located at Saint Therese-Medical Center is olltring a heart 
screening for '39. Designed to identify your cardiac risk 
factors, this screening includes: 



Heart Fitness Test 
HDL and LDL cholesterol 
Total cholesterol/HDL ratio 
Total blood cholesterol 



■Blood pressure 
•Triglyceride level 
•Cardiac risk factor analysis 




i You see it's important to know the condition of your heart, 
1 ; especially if you have a family history of heart disease. By 
' v having this screening, you're taking an important step 
^towards finding out just how heafthy your heart really is. 
i To make an appointment or (or more information, please 
> call (708) 360-2772. 



Saint Therese 
Medical Center 



Heart Center of Lake County 



A Division or Franciscan Sisters Health Care Corporation 
2615 Washington Street Waukegan. Illinois 60085-4988 

C1W1, RilnlThrwwMfdkilCtnm 



January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 3 



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Projects top f 91; centennial uppermost in f 92 



by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

For Antioch, 1991 was the year of 
projects and planning, according to Mayor 
Robert Wilton. 

Some of those plans will be 
implemented in 1992, the year of 
Antioch's centennial. 

"We're looking forward to the 100th 
anniversary celebration," Wilton said. 

Planning for the centennial began in 
November 1990. Hie celebration kicks off 
Feb. 29, the date of the Village's 
incorporation, with a centennial ball 
sponsored by the Antioch Women's Club. 

In May, residents will spend five days 
constructing Centennial Park playground, 
the design of which was made using the 
local children's ideas. 

The heat of the centennial celebration 
will come during the summer, beginning 
with a parade on June 27 and ending with 
Old-Fashioned Merchant Days on July 4. 

But enough of what will come. This 



time of year is also set aside to reflect on 
what has been. And 1991 has been a year 
of breakthroughs for the Village. 

In 1991, the Village Board approved the 
sale of bonds for the Orchard St. 



*M3M 



Planning became such an 
important issue for Antioch in 
1991 that the Village hired on a 
professional planner full-time. 
Bob Silhan, who has worked 
with the Village on an as- 
needed basis previously, was 
named to the full-time post in 
the fall 

extension. The mayor said the Village 
hopes to complete the deal this year and 
get construction started. 

Traffic lights were added to the Main 
and Orchard St. intersection and the 
Village saved residents money through a 
merged garbage pickup program in 1991. 



Wilton said that before last year's 
change, up to four different company's 
picked up Antioch's trash. Residents 
"saved a few dollars," he said, when one 
company, Waste MgL of Lake County, 
was employed 

The mayor said garbage service is better 
now under the one company as well. 

In 1991, Antioch completed plans for 
its half-million-gallon wastewater 
treatment plant expansion. Public Works 
Director Mike Ruxton said bids will be 
going out soon and construction is hoped 
to begin by this summer. 

Other Village projects last year included 
water mains on Windsor Dr., the 
Maplewood Dr. sanitary/sewer line and the 
purchase of an aerobic digester for the 
wastewater treatment plant 

The Village also installed another Well, 
No. 6, at Toft and Orchard streets, Ruxton 
said. 

In '92, the Antioch Public Works DepL 
will be starting an audit to improve on the 
operation and maintenance of its sewer 



collection and potable water distribution 
system. 

Wilton said he wants to see more done 
on the Village's proposed train depot in 
1992. 

"We're interested in getting rail service 
here. We won't get it built in '92, but 
what we're looking for is a commitment,'* 
the mayor said. 

Planning became such an important 
issue for Antioch in 1991 that the Village 
hired on a professional planner full-time. 
Bob Silhan, who has worked with the 
Village on an as-needed basis previously, 
was named to the full-time post in the 
fall. 

Looking out to the future, Wilton 
mentioned the economy as a key to 
Antioch's future. 

"We're concerned about the economy 
and hopefully that will pick up because 
we rely heavily on the sales tax," he said. 

Programs in the Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Dept and Police Dept are paid 
for through sales tax revenues. 



Chamber sums up year, readies for busy 1992 



Antioch's Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry has published a summary of its 
1991 activities. 

"The Chamber is concluding a busy 
year," said Roger Sorensen, chamber 
president and owner of Sorensen Insurance 
Agency. "Antioch's Chamber has tra- 
ditionally been event-driven, but this year 
was especially noteworthy, with seven 
major public events." 

The Chamber's lead event occurred 
during the two weekends before Easter at 
the downtown gazebo, when the 
Chamber's Easter bunny greeted children 
and adults. 

May was the month of the Chamber's 
annual golf outing chaired by Al Robbins 
of the First National Bank of Antioch and 
attended by more than 80 golfers. June's 
RV, Boat, and Home Show, with 29 



exhibitors, was arranged by Mark 
Scarpelli of Raymond Chevrolel-Olds-Gco 
Inc. 

July was a particularly busy month, 
starting with the annual Arts and Crafts 
Fair held at Williams Park. Chairman 
Reed Ano of Colette Plumbing reported 
attendance of over 1,500, with 70 
exhibitors. 

Next came a new event for the Antioch 
Chamber: Taste of Antioch, with 12 
rcstauranteurs and a crowd estimated at 
more than 9,000. Frank DiMarco of 
DiMarco's Restaurant chaired this event 
Simultaneously, Antioch retailers cn-ticed 
bargain hunters to enjoy the popular 
Maxwell Street Days. 

In December. Antioch's Chamber 
invited children and adults to enjoy Santa's 
Enchanted Castle at Toft and Orchard 



through Dec. 22. 

"In addition to events, the Chamber 
sponsors projects to benefit Antioch 
business and the Village as a whole," said 
Sorensen. "For example, the Chamber 
initiated a program, in cooperation with 
Antioch's Redevelopment Commission 
and the Village Public Works' Dept, to 
display decorative banners downtown. 
Reed Ano chaired that project" 

"Fred Stahl of Stahl Signs has started 
work on creating an entrance sign for 
Antioch's industrial park. The efforts of 
Jack Thclen, Thelcn Sand and Gravel, led 
to installation of another Welcome To 
Antioch sign, with landscaping provided 
for all such signs," said Sorensen. 

Antioch's Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry welcomes all Antioch Twp. 
businesses to join the current membership 



roster of over 175. Members meet at 
quarterly mixers and at the February 
Annual Installation Dinner for new board 
members. 

Current Chamber officers are Roger 
Sorensen, Sorensen Insurance Agency, 
president; Mary Kay Tointon, Antioch 
Family Sports Center, vice president; 
Russell Dusak, James Hamlin and Co., 
treasurer, and Allan Robbins, First Nat'I 
Bank of Antioch, secretary. 

Also serving on this year's Board of 
Directors are Reed Ano, Collette Plumb- 
ing; Frank DiMarco, DiMarco's 
Restaurant; Florence Heiselman, Flo's 
Family Hair Care; Mark Scarpelli, 
Raymond Chevrolet-Olds-Gco Inc.; and 
Fred Stahl. Stahl Signs. 

Nominations for new board members, 
to serve three-year terms starting January 
1992, arc now being considered. 




Ready ... wrestle! 

Kurtls Wallraf, on his back, and Mark Wojtklewicz, on top, practice wrestling 
techniques as part of the Lake County Wrestling Club for boys age 8 to 14, 
held on Thursdays at Antioch Community High School. Coach Ted Derousse 
said his team took five out of seven wins at a wrestling meet last year. — 
photo by Ray Plum 



Me, Myself and Mom starts Jan. 3 



by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

The Antioch Parks and Recreation 
DepL is taking registration for the third 
year of Me, Myself and Mom, set to 
begin Jan. 3. 

For 90 minutes each Friday, 2- and 3- 
year-olds and their mothers come together 
for a pre-preschool experience. 

The toddlers are exposed to a school 
environment, cooperative playing, pro- 
jects and group activities that serve as a 
stepping stone to preschool. 

Pam Nooner has been in charge of Me, 
Myself and Mom since it started in 
January 1990. The program appears to be 
succeeding. 

"From what I've heard from a few 
moms who've gone on is that the kids 
adjust well to preschools," said Nooner, 
who has three children of her own and a 



graduate degree in education. 

While raising her own three children, 
Nooner said she became involved in a 
mom-and-tot program that convinced her 
she could run one of her own. 

The strength of Me, Myself and Mom, 
she said, is that it teaches cooperative 
playing, sharing, songs and fun learning 
activities to the children. 

Meanwhile, the moms have a chance to 
meet others there who are in a similar 
situation. 

And when the eight-week session is 
over, the children go to local preschools, 
usually without any of the crying or 
clinging-to-mom behavior many young 
children experience, Nooner said. 

Me, Myself and Mom runs from 9 to 
10:30 a.m. each Friday. For registration 
or information call the Parks and 
Recreation DepL at 395-2160. 



One-drink ordinance pending 



i 






' '-•j, - :. T* 



' ' ' ^^-- ' 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Lakeland (usps 027-080) 

Newspapers 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

OHIee ol Publication; 30 Soulh Whitney St.. Grayslake. IL 
60030. Phono (708] 223-8181. 

Published weekly, second class postage paid at Grayslake, 
IL 60030. 

May Subsection Rates; '16,50 Por Year by MaH poW In 
advance in Lako, Cook Kenosha and McHonry Counties, 
elsowhoro '22,00 Per Year by Mail rjaid In advance. 

Postmaster. Send address changes loAnfcch News- 
Reporter. 30 Soulh Whitney Street, P.O. Bo* 268, 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 



Antioch News-Reporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Villa Record 
Mundeleln News 
Grayslake Times 
Fox Lake Press 
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Vernon Crier 

Round Lake News 

Wauconda Leader 

UbertyvWe News 

LlndenhurstNews 

North Chicago Tribune 

Warren-Newport Press 



M-n-jswsp™ 



(708) 223-81 61 



WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

PubXshor/Pioaideni 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

Goiiora! Manager- - ... . 

JltlDePASQUALE CLAUDIA LEHAHT AWU ROBERTS 

WOLOAYALEMU SHARON ZASADIL ELCAOETH EBEHT 
Awountog Ma-, CurpmihnlA/. Pubic fieklkmUuUmg Ugr, 



by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

The Village Board is mulling an 
ordinance that will allow restaurant 
patrons only one more glass of beer or 
wine at the conclusion of their meal. 

According to a rough draft of the 
ordinance, one glass of wine or beer may 
be served before the meal and only one 
glass may be served after the meal, 
including during dessert. 

"The service of alcoholic beverages 
during the meal shall be incidental and 
complimentary to the service of the 
meal," the proposed ordinance reads. 

The issue came up when T.S. Boogies, 
located at 1200 Main St., requested a 
liquor license to serve beer and wine. 

Residents who live near the restaurant 
protested the request, stating traffic and 



safety concerns. The residents were afraid 
that T.S. Boogies would become a 
hangout, and one man even suggested that 
the restaurant was attempting to become a 
sports bar. 

Several members of the board and 
Village Administrator Tim Wells backed 
T.S. Boogies and said it would be unfair 
to deny it a liquor license. The licences 
was granted. 

A compromise was struck through the 
one-drink-before-and-afier ordinance, which 
is meant to prevent customers from 
buying a small food item and sitting and 
drinking the rest of the time. 

T.S. Boogies has already volunteered to 
abide by the proposed ordinance and hang 
up a sign informing residents of a one- 
drink maximum. 



Lakeland Newspapers 5 



January 3, 1992 



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30 years ago, Jan. 4, 1962 

... Then-Chief Dpty. Charles E. Larson announced 
his candidacy for sheriff on the Republican slate. 

... The same Charles E. Larson also announced (hat 
four 16-year-old boys and a 15-year-old girl were arrested 
in Lake Villa under Lake County's new curfew law. 

... The Antioch Village Board proceeded with plans to 
build a 300,000-gallon water tower, replacing the 
existing 100,000-gaIlon water tower. 

... Five acres of land on the western edge of 
Lindenhurst were eyed for annexation, and it was 
expected that the additional growth would put the 
Village over the 500-residences mark. 

... Grayslake reported its second worst building year 
for 1961, with only $660,000 in building permits 
issued. 

20 years ago, Jan. 6, 1972 

... The Lake Villa zoning ordinance was expected to 
get a good going-over when the Village Board met at its 
first meeting. 

... Then-Lake County Public Defender Robert P. 
Will Jr. announced his candidacy as delegate to the 
Presidential Nominating Convention for the newly 
formed 13th Congressional DisL, consisting of parts of 
Lake, McHcnry and Kane Counties. 

...JLindenhurst was looking to prohibit all vehicles, 
including snowmobiles, from Lake Linden. 

... A $400,000 project to improve drainage on Main 
St. in Antioch was proposed by the Village Board. 

... Antioch Village stickers went on sale for $6 each. 



10 years ago, Jan. 7, 1982 

... The people of Antioch arc the only ones who can 
stop the building of a proposed 70-acre landfill site east 
of the Village, the Lake Silver Home Improvement 
Assoc, president announced. 

... Congressional campaigner Dan DeFosse of 
Antioch was foiled in his attempt to run for the 12th 
DisL Democratic primary when his nominating 
petitions, which were sent by Express Mail to ensure 
they would arrive by deadline, were returned via a mix- 
up in mail sorting in Chicago. 

... Seven Antioch residents lost some $1,500 to a 
Chicago woman during a Christmas season toy scam. 

... Plans to add 36 apartments to Cedar Village in 
Lake Villa were being mulled by the Illinois Housing 
\ Authority. 

Last year, Jan. 4, 1991 

,.^ Antioch Community High School Supt Gary 
Allen said he was looking forward to a successful 
referendum campaign for the high school in 1991. 

... Lindenhurst "Water and Sewer Dept. employees 
were sent out in "bone-chilling" temperatures to repair 
three water mains that busted because of a recent cold 
snap, the Lindenhurst News reported. 

... The Lake Villa Twp. blood drive was asking for 
blood donations for Operation Desert Shield. 

... The Lindenhurst Police Dept expanded its DARE 
program to Pleviak School. 

... Antioch Dollar Video, along with sister stores in 
Libertyville, Round Lake and Streamwood, sent about 
100 videotapes to the troops in Operation Desert Shield. 



ACHS 92-93 
enrollment 
starts Jan. 27 

It seems like Antioch 
Community High School 
students will have just 
returned from winter recess 
when senior graduation 
plans and registration for 
next year will begin. 

During the week of Jan. 
27, students will be 
provided with planners to 
assist them in selecting 
courses for the new school 
year. 

Students will then meet 
with counselors according 
to this schedule: freshman, 
Jan. 27; sophomores, Jan. 
29; and juniors, Jan. 31. 
Also, teachers will provide 
an overview of the 
departments' various course 
offerings. 

These activities are 
designed to remind students 
of the upcoming decisions 
to be made during 
enrollment week, Feb. 3-7. 

All students are 
welcomed and encouraged to 
visit the ACHS Guidance 
Office on their own 
initiative as well. 

Meanwhile, seniors will 
attend a cap and gown 
assembly Feb. 3, Cap and 
gown orders will be taken 
all day Feb. 6. 

Enrollment for eighth- 
graders for 92-93 is 
scheduled at ACHS for Feb. 
10, 11 and 17. 



Weddings 




John W. Slais 

Completes course 

Airman John W. Slais, 
a 1991 graduate of Antioch 
High School and son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John C. Slais of 
Antioch, graduated from Air 
Force basic training at 
Lackland Air Force Base, 
Tx. 



Curin-Peters 

Maria E. Curin of Grayslake and 
Alan R. Peters of Antioch, were mar- 
ried on September 21 at St. Peter's 
Catholic Church in Antioch. Fr. Law- 
rence Hanley officiated the double-ring 
ceremony. 

The bride is the daughter of John 
and Margaret Curin of Brookfield, 111. 
She is a graduate of Triton College in 
River Grove and the College of Lake 
County in Grayslake. She is employed 
by Hewitt Associates in Lincolnshire. 

The groom is the son of Ronald 
and Christine Peters of Antioch. He is 
a graduate of the College of Lake 
County in Grayslake and is employed 
by Equi-Tax, Inc. in Chicago. 

Kelly Curin was the maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Carole Curin, 
Helen Waggoner, Tammy Peters and 
Margie Burba. Ashley Koch was the 
flower girl. 

Joseph Guido was the best man. 
Rick Abbott, Jim Blake, Todd Roc, 



and Lino Altieri were groomsmen. 
Mark and Greg Curin were ushers. 
Ring bearer was Milton Kesslcr. 

A reception for the newly wed cou- 
ple was held at the Tower Room in 
Antioch. A honeymoon cruise to the 
Bahamas and a two-day stay in Miami 
was taken. 

The couple have made their home 
in Antioch. 



■ 




Mr. and Mrs. 
Alan R. Peters 



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Mr. and Mrs. Dean 
Victor Frasch 

Mowen-Frasch 

Julie Elizabeth Mowen and Dean 
Victor Frasch, both from Antioch, 
were married on Aug. 24 at St. Peter's 
Church in Antioch. Father Lawrence 
Hanley performed the double ring cer- 
emony. 

The bride is the daughter of Barbara 
and Richard Mowen of Antioch. She 
is a graduate of Antioch High School 



and the University of Wisconsin-Park- 
side where she earned a degree in Eng- 
lish. She is employed at the College 
of.Lake County. 

The groom is the son of Dale 
Frasch of Antioch and the late Judy 
Frasch. He is a graduate of Carmel 
High School and the University of 
Wisconsin-Parkside where he earned a 
degree in music. He is employed by 
Lakes Tool and Die Co. and Rigoni 
Music. 

Tammie Kruger was the maid of 
honor. Bridesmaids were Kathleen 
Coates and Suzanne Mondrzejewski, 
sister of the groom. Natalie Gers was 
the flower girl. 

Keith Nieze was the best man. 
Groomsmen were Scott Frasch, broth- 
er of the groom, and Randy Mowen, 
brother of the bride. 

A reception for the newly wed cou- 
ple was held at the Country Squire. 
After a honeymoon trip to Door 
County, the couple made their home 
in Antioch. 



Schaeffer-Sobczak 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Sprenger of 
South Bend, Ind., announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Wanda 
Schaeffer of Antioch, to Mr. Wayne 
Sobczak, also of Antioch. 

An early April, 1992, wedding is 
planned. 



Engagement — 



The bride-to-be is a secretary at 
Baxter Laboratories in North Chicago 

while Mr. Sobczak is the manager of 
Realty World-Tiffany Real Estate in 
Antioch. 

The couple plan to reside in Camp 
Lake, Wis. 



& 



New Arrivals 

Kayleigh Carmen Blackmore 

A daughter, Kayleigh Carmen, was bom Oct. 9 el Good Shepherd 
Hospital to Jon and Andrea Blackmore of Antioch. Grandparents are 
Chariss and Margo Hockemeyer of Bristol, Wis., William Blackmore 
St., of Bantingont, Geri Blackmore of Mount Prospect. Great 
grandmothers are Matilda Blackmore of Chicago, Katherine Leliio of 
Elgin. 

Mitchell William Yucus 

A ton, Mitchell William, was born Oct. 12 at Condell Medical 
Center to Paul and Monica Yucus of Antiohc. He has a brother, 
Matthew, 21 mos. Grandparents are Bill and Flo Yucus of Antioch, 
Norma Merten of Merrill, Wis. Great grandmother is Sophie Yucus of 
Lake Villa. 

Carissa Marie O'Neill 

A daughter, Carissa Marie, was bom Oct 19 at Condell Medical 
Center to Steve and Laurie O'Neill of Antioch. She has a sister 
Kaitlynn, 2 1/2. Grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Ray Petrusky of Gumee, 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Verkeyn of Grand wood Park, Barb Turner of 
Antioch, Great grandmothers are Rose Dragunas of Waukegan, Bemice 
Johnson of Omaha, Neb. 

Nicole Lynn Quist 

A daughter, Nicole Lynn, was bom Oct. 19 at Condell Medical 
Center to Michael and Kerry Quilt of Antioch. Grandparents are Wels 
and Marilyn Quist of Grayslake, Edward and Mary Roycroft of Vernon 
Hills. Great grandmothers are Julia Roycroft of Palatine, Mrs. Martin 
Herman of Oilman, Wis. 

Amber Dawn Friddle 

. A daughter, Amber Dawn, was bom Oct. 25 at Condell Medical 
Center to Kim and Michael Friddle of Antioch, She has two brothers 
Jimmy, 12 and Eric, 10 and two sisters, Michelle, 8 and Meluiie, 8, 
Grandparents are Harry and Arlene Hardy of Antioch, Donald and 
Barbara Friddle of Kenosha Wis., 




A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Graesland Baptist Church, 256 Ida St., Antioch, 111. 
Sunday School 11 am.. Morning Warship 11 am, Sunday 
Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

First Church ol Christ, Scientist & Reading Rm., Rta. 173 
and Hardon, Antioch. Phone (708) 395-1196. Sunday 
School, Sunday Church Service 10:30 am, Wodnesday, 8 
p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church, 554 Parkway, Phone (708) 395- 
3393. Sunday School 10 am., Sunday Worship 11 am. and 
7 p.m. Pastor, Rev. Uoyd G. Moss, Jr, 

SL Ignatius Episcopal, 983 Main St. Phono (708) 395- 
0652. Servko 7:30 am. Low Mass, 9:30 am. High Mass, 
Sunday School 930 am. 

Antioch Evangelical Frw Church Tiffany Rd. Phono (708) 
395-4117. Sunday School 9.-30 am., Sunday Worship 8:15 
am. and 11 a.m., Chlldrerfs Church 11 a.m. Nursery both 
services, Awana Club, 630 p.m. Wednesday 

St Stsphen Lutheran Church, Hillside & Rio. 59. Phone 
(708) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8 and 1030 am. Church 
School 9:15 am., Sunday. Rev. Charles E Miller, Pastor. 

Christian Die Fellowship Assemblies ot God Church, 
41625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (708) 395-8572. 
Sunday School (all ages) 9 am., Sunday Morning Worship 
10 a.m., Children's Church 10 a.m., Sunday Evonlng 
Worship 6;3Q p.m., Wednesday Worship & Children's 
Program 7 p.m„ Tuos. Women's FeBowsNp & Bble Study 9- 
1130 am. Jot! Brussaly, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran, 1275 Main St, Phono (708) 
395-1 6E0. Sunday Worship & 1030 am., Surds 1 / School 
925 am., Mon. 7 p.m. Rev. Darald Gruen, Rev. Gregory 
Hormanson, Pastors. Christian Day School (708) 395-1664. 

Mlllburn Congregational United Church ol Christ, Grass 
Lake Rd at Rto. 45. Phono (708) 3S6-5237. Sunday service 
10 am. Children's program 10 am. Rev. Paul R. Moltzer, 

Pastor, 

United Methodist Church of Antioch, 848 Main St Phono 
(708) 395-1259. Summer Worship Hours S am. & 930 a.m. 
The Rev. Kurt A Gamlin, Pastor. 

St Pstir"! Church, 557 W. Lake Si, Antioch. Phono (708) 
395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & B am., Sunday 630, 
8, 930, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 530 p.m. Pastor 
Rev. Father Lawrence Hanley. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church, 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (700) 833-0103. Sunday 
Service 10 am, - 6 p.m. Nursery provided. Junior Church 
during morning worship. Pastor Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rts. 59 & 132), Lako Villa. ' 
(708)350-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 & 10:45 am; 
Sunday School (3 and up) and Bblo Study 930 am 
Rev, John Mmor, Pastor. 



Dan Dugenske, Director 

This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



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6 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 






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The Lizard on 
resolutions and 



by LIZ SCHMEHL 
(708)395-5380 

There are many reasons 
why I am proud to be an 
Anttochian. One of those 
reasons is the way Antioch 



meetings, 
history 



miliar to me. I am sure the ucation is Tuesday, Jan. 14 

old-timers of Antioch will at 7 p.m. in the media cen- 

iecognize even more. ter. 

Dates to remember Parent Workshop 

about Antioch's Centennial Grass Lake School will 

Celebration are: Centennial be holding a parent work- 



keeps its history alive. In a Ball, Feb. 29; Centennial shop beginning in January. 



recent column I shared some 
Grass Lake School history 
with all of you. Along the 
same lines, did you all pick 
up a copy of the Antioch 
Centennial Calendar featur- 
ing scenes of Antioch gone 
by? 

We obtained a copy at 
the State Bank of Antioch 



Hometown 
Goodies 



Man contest, April 11; 

Centennial Park construc- 

and it is truly a keepsake to tion, May-June; Centennial for parents who have chil- 



The subject of the work- 
shop is "Preparing for the 
Drug Free Years." This is a 
prevention program to help 
parents understand what 
their children will be deal- 
ing with concerning saying 
"no" to drugs. The work- 
shop consists of five two- 
hour sessions and is usually 



dren in fourth through 
eighth grades. The presenter 
will be Quinn Gamble from 
InTouch. 

Mark the following 



treasure. The cover shows Parade, June 27; and Cen 

Main St. lined with old- tennial Week celebration, 

time cars, while February June 27 to July 5. 
features a picture of the The people, responsible 

Antioch Palace, a hugh for the history photos dis- 

dance hall that accommoda- played on the calendar are dates on your calendar: Jan. 
ted 600 couples. Unfortu- Roberta Knirsch, Ainsley 16, 23, and 30 and Feb. 6 
nately, a 1930 fire destroyed Wonderling, JoAnne Os- and 13. Remember to keep 
this beautiful facility. mond, Robert Wilton, Pres them open in order to par- 
March highlights the Reckers, The Historical So- ticipate in this worthwhile 
Grice Hotel, built in 1891. ciety and Billcr Press. 
It was AnUoch's second ho- Board Meeting 

The December meeting 
of the Grass Lake School 
Board of Education, was 
well-attended. The board 
held a public hearing on the 
picture of the Antioch Vol- proposed tax levy and then 
untcer Fire Dept. Many of approved the levy, 
the 12 names listed below Supt. Ruth Bill presen- 
the picture are family names ted a curriculum report on 
that are familiar to this day. the successes of the reading 
The last page of the cal- recovery program and Ar- 
endar is a map of Antioch deen Harris was appointed ^* fojver * IS Y?" 
in 1885, showing the as the IASB representative. ,. My New Year s resolu- 
names of the stores and also InformaUon was received Uon wlI J. b ,. e much i ea ? ier l0 
the names of the owners of regarding the supervision of KOTfeft ^n dieting or 
the plots of land surround- the primary recess, and the t^^lZTZ^t 1 

board members who attend 
the IASB convention talked 
about the different informa- 
tions available at the con- 
ference. 



lei and changed hands sever- 
al times through the years 
and ended up being called 
the Mortensen Hotel. 

June shows off a 1913 



workshop. GLS will fur- 
nish more information on 
the workshop at a later date. 
Resolutions 

So now it is 1992, time 
to get going on all of those 
New Year's resolutions. I 
happen to know someone 
that is planning to start a 
diet and exercise routine 
(and it is not the Lizard). I 
also know someone who 
plans to kick the smoking 




Student of the month 



Chris Shule, a senior at Antioch Community High School, was named by the 
Antioch Exchange Club because of his activities, including church programs, 
ACHS baseball, student council and the Spanish club. Shule received a 
certificate and $50 from Exchange Club member Robert Gagnon, left, while 
his parents, Roger and Sandy of Antioch, took on. 



Historical society names 
winter raffle winners 



ing the business district. 

As I glanced over the 
names, I once again noticed 
many are still familiar in 
our Antioch area. I am 
guessing these names are 



resolve to frequently remind 
myself of the roses in my 
life and to stop often to in- 
hale their specialness. 

As I now review all of 
the good things that make 
my world go 'round, I real- 
ize I am surrounded by an 
entire rose garden comprised 
of a great family, wonderful 



The board approved a 

the ancestors of the newer new telephone system for 

generations of families still the school and also ap- 

residing in our hometown, proved a maternity/child- 

Such names as Ring, Wil- rearing leave of absence for friends and special acquain- 

liams, Morley, Chinn, Rin- LD teacher, Sharon Jones. tances. I ask you, who 
ear, Emmons, Garwood, The next scheduled needs anything more? Hap- 

Elliolt, and Smith are fa- meeting of the Board of ed- py New Year! 

Dispatcher home for holidays 



At the Lakes Region 
Historical Society's Dec. 5 
holiday meeting, the draw- 
ing for the winners of the 
"Winter Warm-up V" raffle 
was held. 

The prizes, donors and 
winners were as follows: 

$50 gift certificate to 
Weasel's Restaurant, dona- 
ted by Brad Ipsen of Ameri- 
can Family Ins., won by 
Bill Schneider; commemor- 
ative silver eagle dollar, 
donated by First National 
Bank of Antioch, won by 
Helga Bochm; hand-painted 
duck decoy, donated by Jan- 
et and Bill Brook, won by 
Eileen Pedersen; halogen 
fog light, donated by Peder- 



sen GMC-Antioch, won by 
Ted Sokulski; and a rocking 
horse, donated by Jack's 
Four Squires, won by Dan 
Dugenskc. 

Lunch for four, donated 
by the Old Hickory Inn, 
Antioch, won by Walter 
Nechoda of Lake Villa; 
framed Rockwell print, do- 
nated by Ben Franklin, An- 
tioch, won by Brchda Lem- 
on; gift certificate, donated 
by Johnson Jewelers, Anti- 
och, won by Mrs. Clifford 
Carthey of Waukegan; and a 
framed loon print, donated 
by Strang Funeral Home in 
Antioch, won by Ted and 
Vicki Axton. 

Two Bears vs. Tampa 



Bay tickeis, donated by Ted 
Larson, Antioch, won by 
Al Sodman; five-inch TV/ 
radio, donated by State Bank 
of Antioch, won by Dr. and 
Mrs. W. Biron; hand-made 
afghan, donated by Clara 
Pienlka, won by Joe Titus; 
27-piece kitchen organizer, 
donated by the Ste'mhaus 
Family, won by Lylc "Wil-* 
son; and a wood sculpture, 
donated by Vincent Cough- 
lin, won by Bob Lindblad. 

A proof coin set, dona- 
ted by First Chicago, Anti- 
och, won by Laura Horton; 
and an original oil painting, 
donated by Pres Reckers, 
Antioch, won by Lawrence 
Thayer. 



Exchange Club coining a world record 



by DOUG DUSIK 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Laurie Sunde's Christmas present was 
moving back into her home for the 
holiday celebrations. 

Sunde, a police and fire dispatcher in 
Antioch, was forced out of her home last 
summer when fire ravaged the two-story 
structure in Lake Villa. 

Neither she nor her two children, all of 
whom were home at the time, were 
injured. 

But the home on Lake Ave., which had 
been redecorated only months before, was 

gutted. 

Sunde said the only things surviving 
were the front door and the railing along 
the steps between the upstairs and 
downstairs. 

In the months following the July 27 
fire, she said frustration came about 
because of "basically, a lot of problems 
with the contractors, getting stuff ready 
and getting stuff right." 

For Sunde, who had redecorated her 
home earlier in the year with a lot of 
discontinued store merchandise, finding 
similar stuff was no easy task. 

"When I went back, it was all gone," 
she said. "We did it again a lot different" 

But she likes it much better. 

"Before it was like an old house that 
was helped. Now it's like brand-new on 
the inside. The whole inside was gutted, 
so it had to be," she said. 

Sunde said $21,000 in contents was 



lost in the fire. She estimated structural 
damage at $60,000. 

While her home was being repaired, she 
and her two children stayed at her mother's 
home in Lake Villa. 

"My son did great until we moved back 
in," Sunde said. "Then it was, Where's 
this? Mommy, where's my rocking 
horse?' I couldn't replace it all but I did the 
best I could." 

Her survival was based on the help she 
received from friends, family and co- 
workers. Sunde's list of thank-you's is 
extensive, but among those at the top are: 

The Antioch Police Dept. for 
emotional support; Antioch Fire Dept., 
Antioch Police Assoc, and Red Cross for 
donations; Officer Ron Kay and family for 
bags of clothes; Officer Jim Ruth and 
family for a high chair. 

Pat and Michelle Bailey for bags of 
toys; and of course, Sunde's family for 
taking them in "and putting up with us." 

"These guys really went out of their, 
way. it was incredible," Sunde said. 

With her fresh insight into domestic 
emergencies, Sunde said she has become 
more sensitive to callers at her dispatching 
job. 

"When a call comes in, no matter what 
kind of call it is, I'm more aware of what 
could result," she said. 

"It makes it a much more serious type 
of response. I personally know I can give 
the right answers, as far as fires go. 'Get 
out of the house. Don't take anything.' " 



The Exchange Club of 
Antioch will join nearly 
1 ,200 exchange clubs across 
the country to raise funds 
for the organization's youth 
projects while attempting to 
break a Guiness World 
Record for the longest and 
most valuable line of coins. 

The club is participating 
in The National Exchange 
Club's "Quarters for Kids" 
fund-raising campaign by 
placing collection cannisters 
in cooperating businesses 
throughout the Antioch 
community. 

At the conclusion of the 
national campaign, the 
funds will be converted in 
quarters and used in an at- 
tempt to construct the 
longest and most valuable 



line of coins in the world 
when the organization 
meets in Atlanta for its an- 
nual convention July 24. 

To earn a place in the 
Guiness Book of World 
Records, the exchange club 
members will have to create 
a line over 25.384 miles 
long, with a value exceed- 
ing S 165, 888, the current 
record. They will need 
1,715,553 quarters to do the 
job. 

When the record attempt 
is completed, each local 
Exchange Club will get 
back half of the funds it 
collected, to be used on one 
or more local youth service 
projects of its choice. The 
other half of the proceeds 
will be evenly divided be- 



tween Exchange's Founda- 
tion for the Prevention of 
Child Abuse, which has es- 
tablished a national network 
of over 60 Child Abuse 
Prevention Centers, and its 
Education Foundation, 
which supports the devel- 
opment of materials for 
Exchange's numerous other 
youth projects, including 
the youth of the 
Month/Year Award, and 
Project 

GIVEAKIDAFLAGTOWA 
VE. 

Exchange is a national 
service organization com- 
posed of over 40,000 busi- 
ness and professional men 
and women helping to build 
a better America. 



Colonial Fabrics slates '92 classes 



With its first six months behind, 
Colonial Fabrics in Salem, Wis., is 
scheduling more classes for the new year. 

The store on Hwy. 50 near Paddock 
Lake, Wis., invites customers to come in 
and plan their next quilt. Patterns, fabric, 
books, stencils, stuffing and "cheater 
panels" are among the offerings. 

In addition, classes are being offered 
now through late March. And the third 
Saturday of each month features a sale on 



January 3, 1992 



certain items. 

Some of the classes offered later this 
month include paneled sweatshirts, strip- 
piecing miniatures and a free demonstra- 
tion on winter colors. 

Other offerings this quarter include 
"drunkard's path" sewing, quilts with 
modular and color changes, house block 
wallhangings and tote bags. 

For information call Colonial Fabrics 
Ltd. at (414) 843-3682. 

Lakeland Newspapers 7 



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Lakeland's EDITORIAL 



Pacesetters for care 



A new monument is taking shape in 
west Lake County in the fight against 
alcoholism and drugs, another permanent 
facility for the Northern Illinois Council 
on Alcoholism and Substance 
Abuse(NICASA). 

Construction for the 10.000 square foot 
office and counseling center will be 

Letters to 
the Editor 

Supports wolf control 

Editor 

I may be new to this area, but I am not 
new to the problems of deer control, a 
problem that is facing park management 
all over this country. 

I am also not surprised at the non- 
educated remarks by Andrea Moore, 
president of the Lake County Forest 
Preserve DisL, when she said the "general 
public is more willing to accept deer than 
wolves" (concerning introducting wolves 
to control deer population). 

This is one Lake County resident who 
would gladly accept and defend the 
introduction of wolves back to our forests. 
Shc(Moore) should ask the residents what 
they think rather than make non-obvious 
statements. Put the question to a vote. 
The program is working in other states. 
Why not us in Lake County? 

Sheila Cameron 
Mundelein 

Leadership lacking 

Editor 

Unless Lake Zurich is unlike the rest 
of the world, leadership comes from the 
top. Mayor Kay is at the top of our vil- 
lage government. So, where is his leader- 
ship? 

Both the state and federal governments 
have minority leaders and things get done. 
If the president and governor spent their 
time crying about the other side, if they 
constantly changed positions just to dis- 
agree with the other side, they would be 
doing what our mayor is doing. Our state 
and federal governments would be in tur- 
moil. Their leaders would be held accoun- 
table and pitched out of office. 

It's time for statesmanship, concilia- 
tion, compromise and leadership. The 
mayor's tactics will only fail, bringing the 
full weight of responsibility down on his 
shoulders. You can only fool the people 
for a while. 

John E. Petrie, Jr. 
Lake Zurich 

Theaters no advantage 

Editor: 

It was disappointing to hear that Lake 
Zurich officials changed a residentially- 
zoned property to allow a movie theater. 

The four freshman trustees: Ms. Vas- 
els, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Coffey and Mr. 
Blum, really showed their inexperience on 
this zoning change. It would have been 
wise for those freshman trustees to listen 
to the more experienced trustees and May- 
or Kay, and wait until many of the unan- 
swered questions regarding the theater were 
answered. 

I urge the 630 Lake Zurich and Deer 
Park residents who signed petitions 
against the theater and those opposed to 
the theater who were not approached to 
sign these petitions to do their shopping 
elsewhere. 

Only a few individuals who appeared at 
the board meetings supported the theater 
versus at least 20 homeowners opposed to 
it. Incidentally, these individuals were 
store owners in Lake Zurich, people who 
"would greatly benefit from the increased 
traffic at the theater location. This should 
tell the Lake Zurich community as to 
"which side their bread is buttered on." 

I am certainly apprehensive as to what 
the future of Lake Zurich will look alike. 

Deborah L. Kull 
Barrington 
(Continued on next page) 



pushed during the winter months to meet 
a target date of June IS occupancy, 
Services offered in Waukegan, Prairie 
View and the College of Lake County 
will be duplicated at the building located 
on Fish Lake Rd. and Rte. 120 near 
Baxter Laboratories Round Lake plant 
When opened, the building will replace a 
facility now located in Fox Lake. 

Baxter Healthcare Corp. donated seven 
acres of land valued at $300,000 as the 
site. Another county business giant, 
Abbott Laboratories, is donating $150,000 
toward construction and equipment 

Support of Abbott and Baxter epitomizes 
the partnership that is flourishing between 
business and NICASSA. Other corporate 
good citizens are supporting the agency's 
capital fund campaign. NICASSA will be 
the recipient of significant grant money to 
go with countless donations. 

When the new facility opens, Lake 
County and eastern McHenry County 
which directs referrals to NICASSA, will 
be well armed in the battle against alcohol 
and drugs, or at least better armed in a 
conflict where battles are being won, but 
where combat seems unfettered at times. 
Baxter and Abbott deserve the praise of all 
for being pacesetters. 

Thoughts 
for 1992 

What if American consumers took 
matters in their own hands to correct the 
trade imbalance with Japan? Stop buying 
Japanese autos or at least Japanese autos 
not built in the U.S.?...Shoe leather will 
be worth more than payola in garnering 
votes for the Lake County Board in the 
March 17 primary. ..Taxpayers should stop 
grumbling and attend more village council 
and school board meetings if they don't 
like the way their taxes are being 
spent.. Hoops in the NBA ought to be 
narrowed and the cups on the golf courses 
we play be made larger...Isn't it about 
time that Illinois families with school-age 
children have a choice where the kids 
attend school and give the voucher system 
a chance?... Let's all contribute a dime to 
the war chest to defeat Congressman 
Rostcnkowski so America can get some 
sensible tax legislation. ..Make parents sit 
at least 10 rows back at all Little League 
games.. .If term limitation can't be 
enacted, how about a mandatory retirement 
age for public officials based on age and 
time in service?. ..It's a toss-up whether 
teachers or big league baseball players 
whine more about what they're 
worth...Name a better spectator sport than 
a well played high school basketball 
game, girls or boys... 




Viewpoint 



Main street's 
regaining its 
spot in sun 

by BILL SCHROEDER 

Suddenly, main street is back in style. 

Looks like 1992 might be the year that 
a number of Lake County villages start 
paying attention to downtown and main 
street revitalization. For nearly 30 years, 
main street has been playing second fiddle 
to big regional malls and strip centers. 
. Now there's a new focus on rekindling 
once vital commercial, economic and 
social values that only a true main street 
or downtown possess. 

Lake Zurich Mayor Jim Kay and the 
village council will be working with a 
consultant on plans for an economic 
transfusion for the area around Rte. 22 
and Old Rand Rd. Mayor Marilyn 
S indies and Mundelein officials are in the 
process of surveying merchants in the 
vicinity of Rte. 45 and Seymour Ave. on 
reestablishing downtown values. 
Mundelein hopes a "do-it-yourself' spirit 
will spark revitalization. 

Grayslakc isn't so sure about 
homegrown energy. Professional help 
might be necessary to revive Center St. 
as a thriving retail hub. A special 
committee is studying the feasibility of 
retaining the services of Bert Stilt, 
midwest expert on downtown 
revitalization, Stitt already is working 
with Antioch leaders on putting new life 
and a new look into the north county 
shopping locale. 

Fox Lake will rely on plans of its 
Economic Development Commission to 
mastermind a one-shot event in August to 
dramatize its place as a good spot to buy 
cars and boats and reaffirm its reputation 
as a major recreation center. Banker Ken 
Birchard, EDC chairman, says, "Let's sell 
something and have some fun to boot." 
Perhaps no community has worked 
longer or harder than Liberty ville in 
reestablishing its Milwaukee Ave. 
downtown as an important shopping 
destination. Once relegated to obscurity 
by nearby Hawthorne Center, Milwaukee 
Ave. merchants have fought back under 
the banner of MainStreet, a marketing and 
redevelopment organization. Dan 
Mayworm, MainStreet chairman, has 
spelled out an intriguing approach for 
1992, devising night time activities to 
bring people downtown after dark for 
dining, entertaining and shopping. 




So keep an eye on main street in 1992. 
That's where the action will be. 

••••••• 

GOOD NEWS— Among the good 
news arriving with holiday cards and 
letters was word from Wills Point, Texas, 
that Bruce Cairy, retired editor of the Great 
Lakes Bulletin, the award-winning Navy 
newspaper, is recovering well from major 
stomach surgery. Along with his editing 
chores, Bruce used to write a dog column 
for Lakeland Newspapers and he was the 
man behind the camera at countless 
county weddings. Now the former Lake 
Villa resident and his wife, Lorraine, are 
enjoying retirement in Texas. Another 
warm greeting was received from Charles 
Cermak, the irrepressible Antioch 
Realtor, who just celebrated his 80th 
birthday in grand style. He and his wife 
make their home in Riviera Beach, Fla. 

*•••••• 

BACK TO LAND— Fire Chief Lisle 
Matthews will be hanging up his helmet 
and boots for the last time in March. 
After 32 years as a fireman and at age 62, 
Lisle says it's time to turn over (he reigns 
of the Wauconda Fire DepL to younger 
men. Matthews isn't going to quit work, 
though. His plans are to return to farming 
in the Wauconda area. Matthews is the 
last of an era where fire chiefs either were 
farmers or auto mechanics. Now fire 
chiefs generally are career professionals. 

••••••• 

BACK AGAIN— F.T. "Mike" 
Graham, back on the campaign trail again, 
bridles at comparisons with Harold 
Stassen and Lar "America First" paly, two 
perennial candidates — and perennial losere- 
-ofyore. 

With indomitable spirit, Mike is psyched 
up for the 16th race of his long career in 
Lake County politics. "I'm no Stassen or 
Lar Daly. I like to think of myself as a 
sort of Abraham Lincoln candidate. You 
know," Graham reminded with a broad 
grin, "Lincoln ran seven times before 
winning." 

Mike vows what he chooses to call a 
"720 mile campaign." That's the amount 
of geography he plans on traveling in the 

new County Board DisL 15 all on 

foot By covering the district north of 
Rte. 60 stretching from Lake Forest to 
Mundelein, the redoubtable candidate 
estimates he'll have the equivalent of 
$10,000 invested, the amount he estimates 
would be needed for several mailings. . 
Mike's only investment will be shoe 
leather and time. He's got plenty of both. 

Through the wizardry of computer 
redisricting as employed by county aides, 
Graham will be squaring off against two 
former colleagues from Libertyville, Carol 
Calabresa and Jim Dolan. Graham already 
has his two foes neatly categorized. He 
says Calabresa, a former ally, is a 
moderate. Dolan is pro-development, 
according to Graham. Tmthe 
environmental candidate, just like I've 
always been." 

••••••• 
ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Our 

holidays were enlivened by a visit from 
Purdue University's most famous canine, 
Thedog, the Sigma Chi fraternity house 
dog who lately has been enjoying 
apartment dwelling off campus—like all 
BMOC's. Thcd had no trouble upstaging 
Roscoe and K.C., our queenly black cat. 
They abdicated the center stage grudgingly 
at first, but soon became fast friends. Now 
it's back to the Boilermaker campus for 
Thed and back to the daily routine for the 
rest of us. Happy New Year! 



v 



6 Lakeland Nowspaport 




January 3, 1992 



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Lakeland's OPINION 



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makes one candidate see red 




POLITICALLY 



IT 



CLASSY CANDIDATE 

Putting fear into the heart of candidates 
for state representative in the new Slst 
Dist. is Peter Fitzgerald of Palatine. 
Opponents are former Buffalo Grove 
Mayor Verna Clayton and County 
Board member Roberta "Bobbie" 
O'Reilly of Long Grove. 

Clayton's campaign never neglects to 
mention her well-heeled opponent from 
Palatine. An additional jab says he has no 
experience in government 

Fitzgerald is making this a first-class 
campaign. His slick, solid-green press kit 
is filled with green-and-while press re- 
leases. TTicre is also a picture of the 
young-looking partner in the Chicago law 
firm of Riordan, Larson, Bruckert & 
Moore. It specializes in bank litigation 
and regulation. He's a graduate of Dart- 
mouth, Aristotelian University (Greecc( 
and the University of Michigan Law 
School. 

Politics? He ran unsuccessful for state 
rep. in the 66th Dist of Palatine, Elgin 
and Kane County in 1988, was a Palatine 
precinct captain and served as a political 
aide to Congressman Philip Crane. 

His Lake County connections? Direc- 
torships on banks in Vernon Hills and 
Barrington. 

Fitzgerald calls himself "A Republican 
for the '90s," a "citizen legislator" and a 
conservative. (All candidates in this race 
say they are conservatives.) 

He's even got separate campaign 
literature for the Cook and Lake counties 
part of the district. 

Does this make him a winner? Not if 
Clayton can help it. She's getting lots of 
help and advice from two state reps who 
happen to run GOP politics in Lake 
County — Robert Churchill (R-Lake 
Villa) and William Peterson (R- 
Prairie View). 

DONE DEAL? 

Question for the new yean Will 
Dwight Magalis retire as Lake County 
administrator in 1992? 

Will his place be taken by William 
"Bill" Barron, deputy administrator? 

Magalis has 25-plus years with the 
county and can retire anytime. 

During an interview on WKRS not 
too long ago Barron was asked when he 
will take over from Magalis. The not-so- 
humble Barron said it wasn't a sure thing. 
But he's got the inside track. Those in the 
know say it is a done deal. 

Barron, who is secretary to the Lake 

Letters 

(Continued from preceding page) 

Catering to developers 

Editor 

I would be willing to bet that every 
member of the Wauconda Village Board 
made the statement dial he was for con- 
trolled growth during the last election. 
The next time you see one of them, ask 
him what exactly he means by controlled 
growth? You will probably get just a 
puzzled, dumb-looking stare. 

However, if you let their actions an- 
swer that question, you will find that it 
means high density, spot-zoning and ig- 
noring area residents. It also means disre- 
garding their own Zoning Board and vil- 
lage engineer's recommendations. Catering 
to developers is this board's main concern 
by allowing streets and easements that fall 
well below current Village standards. 

Roney Farm Developers pay no atten- 
tion to the Zoning Board, certainly the 
village board doesn't. Instead, go straight 
to the village board. Tell them the experts 
they appointed to the Zoning Board are 
wrong and the neighbors' concerns are 
idealistic. Narrow the streets, raise the 
density and eliminate parking and you will 
be a shoe-in, just like the Prate develop- 
ment on Garland and Main St. 

Wauconda residents, remember this 
village board in the next few years, when 
you can't make a left hand turn onto Main 
St from Garland Rd. But more impor- 



County Solid Waste Agency (SWALCO), 
was engineering himself a job as head of 
that new bureaucracy. That was before the 
Magalis opening came up. 

SWALCO has narrowed a nationwide 
search of possible directors to six. 
Chairman Robert Depke wants some- 
one with an incinerator background. 

PUBLIC SERVANT 

The Grinnell name has been synony- 
ous with public service for a half century 
in Lake County. That tradition is being 
carried on by Sheriff Clinton Grinnell 
and his son, William, Fremont Twp. road 
commissioner. 

Before them there was Guy Grin- 
nell., a cousin of the sheriff. The Liber- 
tyville Twp. supervisor and member of 
the County Board from 1956-69 died last 
month at the age of 96 at his retirement 
home in a suburb of Houston, Tx. 

Grinnell was a Lake County power 
broker in the days of Grant Twp.'s Frank 
Valenta, Cuba Twp.'s Joe Wtfdi and 
Shield's Twp.'s Robert Milton. Grin- 
nell served several terms as county board 
chairman. 

In life, as in death, people had nothing 
but good to say about Grinnell. He re- 
spected people and they, in turn, gave him 
the same courtesy. 

DEPKE'S NEMISIS 

County Board Chairman Robert 
Depke isn't getting a free ride back into 
the office he has held on and off for 
something like 18 years. To assure their 
re-election, he and other members of the 
County Board redistricted themselves in 
nice, safe, comfortable districts. 

But that hasn't bothered Richard 
Behr, a Gurnce attorney. He wants to re- 
tire Depke. That's why he is challenging 
the man who wields the power in Warren 
Twp. and much of Lake County. 

Who is this brave man? Someone 
who thinks he can do it Also, he has a 
political legacy. His father, Warren, is 
none other man former Waukegan Twp. 
supervisor. That was for four years until 
1976. Prior to that he was the well-known 
Waukegan Twp. clerk. 

Warren and Richard share a Waukegan 
law practice. 

WAUCONDA MAGIC 

Wauconda is rapidly becoming the 
center of the political universe in Lake 
County. Two candidates for state repre- 
sentative in the new 52nd District will 



make appearances there the same January 
Friday night Jan. 10. 

At Mcr's restaurant which is the place 
for politicians to see and be seen, Al 
Salvi of Lake Zurich and Liber- 
tyville will have a cocktail reception. 
Tickets are $10 each available, no less, 
than Venita McConnel (708) 526- 
7851. Prosit time is 6 p.m. 

Three blocks away, Nancy Master- 
son of Barrington will have a freebie. 
She will start by discussing her views on 
the economy, education, environment and 
ethics. At 8 p.m. a light lunch will be 
served 

Guess which candidate draws the 
biggest crowd? Not the sleeper. 

"I'm going to Nancy's for food and 
Al's for drinks," one quipster said. 

MOVING TARGET 

Congressman Phil Crane of the 8th 
District has something new to contend 
with. His statement of candidacy for the 
March ballot has been challenged. 

Doing it is one of his challengers, 
Gary Skoien. 

Crane lists a Mount Prospect ad- 
dress. The property at 506 Can-Dota Dr. 
is owned by former aide. But his voter 
registration hasn't changed, says Skoien. 

That key record says Crane still lives 
and votes in McHenry County. The 
congressman moved there in December 
1990 in anticipation of redistricting that 
would push his Lake-Cook counties dis- 
trict into McHenry County. It doesn't 
look like it will happen. 

Skoien says voters have a right to 
know where a candidate lives. 

As for not being able to hit a moving 
target. 



tantly, remember ihem at election time, 
when they try to tell you that they arc for 
controlled growth. 

Donald Schaal 
Wauconda 

Tax answer: cut quickly 

Editor 

House Speaker Mike Madigan is again 
speaking of a "temporary tax increase" to 
counteract the effects of the recession on 
the state treasury. Bui there is no such 
thing as a "temporary" tax increase. A 
new temporary tax increase will be just as 
permanent as the last one. 

Further, according to the Advisory 
Commission in Intergovernmental Rela- 
tions, which considers all types of taxes, 
Illinois is already one of the highest tax 
states in the country. The increasing tax 
burden facing individuals and businesses 
in Illinois has crippled growth here over 
the last decade. Adding to that burden in 
response to the recession will only 
heighten the effects of the recession on the 
people of Illinois. 

The only solution to the current bud- 
get mess is to make spending cuts quick- 
ly. If this is too politically difficult for 
the legislature, then broad latitude must be 
given to Governor Edgar to do what must 

be done. 

Al Salvi 

Lake Zurich 




by JOES 

SOULAK^ 



L*»« » » pi • 



OVERHEARD/SEEN 

**** LAKE 7JJRTCH-. 

Scrooge lives! At least in the eyes of vil- 
lage employees. It happened at the the 
Christmas party for village employees 
Dec. 14 at the Concordia. When the 
absent Trustee Monty Campbell was 
introduced, along with all village officials, 
he didn't get the usual round of applause. 
It was boo's and hisses. Campbell and 
three cohorts on the village board want to 
back the truck up to the village hall and 
clean house before anyone knows their 
agenda. **** ROUND LAKE 
PARK— For Christmas Village Clerk 



SPEAKING 



Star Southworth did something sweet 
this year. For village trustees it was a box 
of homemade cookies. For special persons 
on her list it was box of Queen Anne 
chocolates. M#ff 
LIBERTYVILIR— F T "Mike" 
Graham has the luck of the Irish heading 
into 1992. His name has been drawn for 
the No. 1 position on the ballot in his 
Dist. 15 bid for re-election to the County 
Board. In the second and third spots, 
respectively, are incumbents Jim Dolan 
and Carol Calabresa. This race makes 
Dolan almost a sure winner. Graham and 
Calabresa are former allies. M44 



COMING EVENTS 

WW Thursday. Tan. 9; 
Reception for Richard "Dick" Raftis, 
candidate for the Lake County Board in 
Dist 11, at the Olde Stratford Hall, 54 S. 
Seymour Ave., Gray slake, 5 to 8 p.m. 
For $15 tickets call the Raftis home at 
(708) 367-5301. *#*« Friday. Ian. 
Uk Meet candidate Nancy Masterson 
running for state representative in the new 
52nd District at American 'Legion Hall, 
911 S. Main St., Wauconda, 6 to 8 p. m. 
Free, including light dinner. 4#fftti 
Friday. .Tan. 10: Cocktail reception on 
behalf of Al Salvi, Republican candidate 
for state representative in the new 52nd 
District, Mer's restaurant, 313 E. Liberty 
SL (Rte. 176) Wauconda, 6 p.m. For $10 
tickets call Venita McConnel at (708) 
526-7851. 



Wlien The Going Gets 

Tough, the Tough Get 

Advertising. 



Whether business is good or slow, 
you have to get your share of 
whatever business is around. 
Cutting back your advertising puts 
you at a disadvantage the very 
moment you need an edge. 
Increasing your advertising gives 
you the edge. 

In times of uncertainty, 
consumers are careful and a little 
reluctant to spend. They want 
information. One of the main 
ways they get information about 
products, services, prices and 
values is from advertising. Yours 
or somebody else's. 



Here's a hard fact to chew on. Over 
any given period, a company that 
advertises below the industry 
average has sales that are below the 
industry average. 

Advertising is news — about 
products and services. Most 
consumers look for this kind of news 
in the pages of their community 
newspaper. In plush times, retailers 
often experiment with other media. 
But when the going gets tough, they 
concentrate their efforts in the 
community newspaper because it 
provides immediate payoff at the 
cash register. 



• Antloch News-Reporter • Fox Lake Press • Grayslake Times 
• Great Lakes Bulletin • Gurnee Press • Lake Villa Record 

• Lake Zurich Enterprise • Llbertyvtlle News • Llndenhurst News 
Mundeleln News • North Chicago Tribune • Round Lake News 

• Vernon Crier • Warren-Newport Press • Wauconda Leader 

Your-on-the-job community newspapers 

Contact Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 South Whitney Street 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake,IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 



January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 9 



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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 



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New Year's resolutions which pay off big time 



by DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Have a happy, healthy and prosperous 
New Year, and remember, it depends very 
much on the quality of the environment. 

Every contribution to environmental 
preservation is worthwhile, no matter how 
small. In the words of Edmund Burke, 
"Nobody made a greater mistake than he 
who did nothing because he could only do 
a little. 1 * 

Ghandi encouraged participation another 
way. "Your individual actions may seem 
unimportant, but it is absolutely essential 
you do them." Little things mean a lot. 

If thinking remains "What does one 
leaky faucet amount to when an alfalfa 
field requires thousands of gallons of water 



every week," consider what might be lost. 
If millions mind what seems like a trifle 
effort, the effect is tremendous! A city full 
of litter would come miraculously clean if 
each person in it didn't litter. 

Most environmental damage has been 
wrought in the last 150 years of man's 
reign. The effects are correctible in even a 
shorter time frame. Rivers and streams 
flowing thick with chemical wastes and 
effluent can be made to run pure again in 
less than k decade. 

England's Thames River, for example, 
went from being a cesspool to a Salmon- 
run river in less than 10 years. The soot 
and grime that once coated city buildings 
in many U.K. coal-producing regions is 



now a thing of the past, "pollution is 
nothing but the resources we're not 
harvesting," said R. Buckniinster Fuller. 

We can clear the air quality in places 
like the Los Angeles basin, stop acid rain 
from denuding Eastern forests and prevent 
any further degrading of the protective 
ozone layer before the end of this decade if 
we take the trouble and spend the money. 
The technology is waiting for the will. 

The following are a few suggested 
resolutions for the New Yean 
♦compost whenever possible, 
*switch from incandescent lights to 
florescent, 

*plant at least one tree, 
*use only cloth cleaning towels, 



♦turn off the shower while you soap, 

"'install water-savings devices in your 

toilet and shower, 

*walk or bicycle at least one car errand 

weekly, 

*use re-usable cloth bags to shop, 

*get a permanent coffee cup for the job, 

♦use biodegradable laundry soap, not 

detergents, 

♦turn down the thermostat at night, 

♦recycle your bottles, cans papers, 

♦buy recycled products (those with a 

Green Seal), 

♦cut down on pesticides, 

♦switch to cloth diapers, and 

♦eat at the bottom of the food chain. 

♦Source: The New Green Christmas 



Dissidents unite to delay passage of watershed law 



by DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 
Lakeland Newspapers 

The Lake County Stormwatcr 
Management Commission delayed until 
Jan. 15 approval of its watershed 
development ordinance, a move supported 
by environmentalists as well as 
homebuilders. 

Commissioners were expected to 
recommend the ordinance to the County 
Board Dec. 18. However they held their 
decision after receiving suggested changes 
from the technical advisory committee 
within 24 hours of slated action on the 
law. Officials also wanted to consider 
comments from the public made at the 
December meeting. 

Refinements suggested by the technical 
advisory committee soften the law's 
language to focus more on the future than 
the past. Toning the wording was 
requested by the Homebuilders 
Association of Greater Chicago. 

"It made it look like they were solely 
guilty for all the flooding that ever 
occured or will occur in the county," said 



Caroll Schaal, principal planner for tiie 
commission. 

Remarks made by members of the 
North Suburban Group of the Sierra Club 
and the homebuilders association at the 
Dec. 18 meeting also contributed to the 
delay. 

The groups arc at odds concerning 
development of and around wetlands. At 
the core is the amount of buffer land that 
should be required around a wetland to 
keep it functioning. 

Though they oppose each other, the 
groups agree on one thing: that the 
ordinance should not be approved without 
resolution of the matter. 

"The issue of buffers has been a major 
disagreement between the private sector 
and the stormwatcr staff from day one," 
said Roger Gatewood, senior vice 
president of the homebuilders association. 
"Our industry has no objection to the 
stormwatcr staff functioning as an agent 
for the federal regulation agency provided 
they enforce only those federal regulations 
that exist 



"The staff has chosen to incorporate 
wetlands language above and beyond that 
required by the federal agency in a 
proposed ordinance and as a result, the 
private sector has not reached a consensus 
with staff on this ordinance," he said. 

Sierra Club member Phil Broder said 
the buffer should be defined by the hydra 
soil around the wetland. • 

Broder, a wildlife biologist with the 
Lake County Forest Preserve District, 
said, "This ordinance creates a 30-foot 
buffer zone. For lack of a better word, it's 
ludicrous. Thirty feet is 10 yards. A 
wetland is not defined by the water's edge. 
They are not swimming pools with 
impermeable concrete liners. They are 
defined by the hydra soil, the vegetation. 
They are living, breathing things. You 
build up to the edge of the water, you take 
those hydra soils and crush them. You 
compact them and make them unable to 
hold water. The water rises. It stays in the 
pond up to a point, but it can't get into 
the soil, the sponge that is going to hold 
water and prevent flooding." 



The goal of the ordinance is to insure 
that new development does not increase 
stormwatcr drainage problems or create 
new ones. The proposed law's impact on 
existing development in the flood plain is 
only vaguely addressed. 

Eliminated from the proposed law is a 
requirement for public hearing before 
construction permits arc issued in 
communities which have becomed 
certified by adopting the ordinance. "We 
want to make sure it's easy to be certified 
so developers can just go to that 
community and get their permits instead 
of having to come to us," Schaal said, "so 
we dropped the requirement for public 
hearing." 

The stormwater management 
commission, however, will act as a 
watchdog to insure enforcement of the 
ordinance, Schaal said. All permits issued 
will go to the commission for review. If 
violations are found, certification can be 
pulled and the commission will regain 
enforcement authority. 



Moore's candidacy hinges on hearing set for Jan. 3 

Objections to election checked with someone on agrees with land-buying complete election petitions, the county clerk can proceed for the County Board just 

petitions filed by County duty al the elections counter purchases of the Lake The three persons con- with the printing of the prior to a mid-December 

in the County Clerk's office County Forest Preserve ducting die hearings said the spring ballot. deadline. Until that time she 



Board candidate Andrea 
Moore of Libcrtyvillc have 
been continued to Friday, 
Jan. 3. 

The petitions were chal- 
lenged because the forms are 
from a previous election. 
They do not have the dates 
they were circulated by the 
person obtaining the signa- 
tures. Moore did not circu- 
late the petitions. 



and their use authorized. 

The two forms contained 
40 signatures, far more than 
the required 25. However, 
they arc on forms from an 
election six or eight years 
ago. 

Filing the objection is 
Linda Raymond of Libcr- 
tyvillc, a member of I- 



Dist. Moore is chairman of preponderance of state law Hearing this and two had been talking about run- 
thc Forest Preserve district favors the objector, not the other petition challenges is ning for stale representative 



board. 

Al this week's hearing 
Raymond's attorney cited 
two court cases, one from 
the state appellate court, the 
other from Lake County 



candidate. 

In the event the 
committee rules in favor of 
Moore, the objector indi- 
cated she will file a Circuit 



Court action. This would be 
Circuit Court of last year, heard immediately, probably ncy's office 
upholding the necessity of within the next 10 days, so Moore filed her petitions 



a three-member committee, in the new 61st Dist. Pcli- 
It is composed of County tions for that election will 
Clerk Linda Hess, Clerk of not be due until the stale's 
Circuit Courts Sally Coffclt two major political panics 
and Helen Rosenberg of the resolve their differences by 
Lake County Slate's Atlor- Jan. 6 or the stale Supreme 

Court enforces one some- 
time after that date. 



At a hearing earlier this RATE (Individuals for Re- 
week Moore said the valid- sponsible and Accountable 
ity of the forms was Tax Equity). Her group dis- 

Second Wind Group 

Second Wind Group will mcci the first Thursday of each monlh, 7 
p.m., (except Dec., Jan., July and August), at the Heart Center of Lake 
County. Lcam tips about better breathing, how to fight illness and how 
to catch a "second wind" with your lung disease. For more information, 
call (708)360-2247. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

GRANT COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL 

SPECIAL BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING 

TO BE HELD 

JANUARY 9, 1992-7:30 P.M. 

GRANT COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY 

AGENDA 

I. Call to order 

II. Roll call 

III. Audience 

IV. Superintendent/Board Reports 
Strategic Planning 

A. Critical Analysis 

1. Financial Profile/Resources 

2. Demographics 

B. Environmental Scanning 
1 . Economic data 

C. Instructional Priorities 

1. Outcomes Based Instruction 

D. Action Plan 
1 ; Financial 

V. Closed Session 
Consider information regarding appointment, 
employment or dismissal of an employee or officer. 
. Adjourn 

0192A-245-FL 



VI 



January 3, 1992 



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10 Lakeland Newspapers 







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January 3, 1992 



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Artist's creative touch reflected on tile 



~""-'wmr'"' ^ - 





Among Julie's recent work is 
a fruitbasket mural painted 
for a client's kitchen and a 
mural of flowers and insects. 
Julie's china painting can 
customize any room In the 
home, Julie says she has a 
special talent for reflecting a 
clients taste and personality 
with her creative ability. 



by RHONDA VINZANT 

Lakeland Newspapers 

Julie Meade spent her California 
childhood crouched in a corner drawing or 
sketching. The slender thirty-something 
brunette said her family always described 
her by saying, "she's so artsy." 

"Either I was to become an artist or an 
actress," she said. "There is a fine line 
between exaggerating and being creative. 
I think I drove my mother nuts because I 
looked at things differently." 

She is known simply as Julie by her 
clients and friends, saying she rarely uses 
her last name and signs all her work 
"Julie." 

Transplanted to Illinois as a teenager, 
she sleeps with a sketch pad next to her 
bed, and says one of her biggest assets is 
her ability to join together her client's 
taste and personality with her creative 
ability in china painting. 

Most of her china painting is done on 
ceramic tiles although she also does 
pedestal sinks, dishes and planter boxes. 

Her vocation, is also her therapy. It 
helps her to relax and cope with life as a 
free-lance artist and single mother of three, 
who manages to balance her priorities in 
taking care of her children and pursuing a 
career. 



Julie meets potential clients at Euro- 
Tile, 775 W. Main Street, Lake Zurich 
from 9 a.m. to noon, weekdays for an 
initial consultation and then visits clients 
homes to learn more about them and help 
them put together a personalized look to 
their ceramic tile. Most of her painting is 
done out of a studio in her home so that 
she is there before and after school for her 
three children: Jeff, 12; Mike, 10 and 
Shannon, 8. 

Julie has been working out of the Euro- 
Tile store for the past two years. "I 
believe it is a very unique form of art, that 
not many tile stores can offer," she said. 
"You can customize anything with china 
painting." 

Prior to coming to work at Euro-Tile 
she was co-owner of Lake Zurich's 
Reflections in Glass, with her former 
husband Tim Meade. Following the 
divorce, she left the business and has been 
making it on her own ever since. "I'm 
very fortunate that I've been able to make 
it doing this," she said. "I'm lucky to be 
able to do something I enjoy. But, if I 
had to work in a fast food restaurant to 
pay the bills, I would." 

Julie specializes in very detailed work 
with flowers and insects being her 
speciality. "I can paint you a very detailed 



bee with fractions of an inch," she said. 
"I've always had an eye for detail in art 
work." 

She studied art at the Art Institutes in 
both San Francisco and Chicago and 
Harper College. "I taught myself how to 
do china painting based on various things 
1 had learned in my education and some 
background with ceramics from my 
mother as a child," she added. "The 
colors are difficult to learn, because they 
change when you fire them in the kiln. 
Once I conquered the difficult things, I 
knew I could be successful at it." 

Julie's work is a four step process. 
Following her initial meeting with clients 
at Euro Tile, the second meeting takes 
place in the client's home with 
measurements and photographs taken to 
remind Julie of the home while she 
prepares the drawing and fired pallet color 
chart to give a true reflection of the 
finished color. After approval of her 
estimate, clients select field tiles and Julie 
sets to work painting and firing the tiles. 
The tiles are then installed by either a 
Euro Tile installer or an individual of the 
client's chosing. 

Many of her requests are for tiles that 
coordinate with wallpaper to intersperse in 
backsplashes, countertops and floors. She 



has done a table top in ceramic tile that 
was painted with each tile representing a 
different event in the couple's life and a 
landscape of a family's backyard that was 
inlayed on a wall behind a wet bar in their 
family room. "That is one of the best 
things about china painting," she said. "It 
is so versatile and can be used in many 
places in the home." 

One of her favorite jobs was one she did 
for a pool house bathroom. In the bottom 
of a pedestal sink she painted three pink 
flamingos clad in sunglasses. "Pedestal 
sinks are difficult to do because you have 
to paint it upside down or the colors will 
run," Julie said. "I constructed a holder to 
place the sink in while painting it. I lie 
on my back and paint like Michaelangelo 
in the Sistine Chapel." 

She has also done designs for tiles 
surrounding an in-ground pool. 

Tile artwork can also be done in frames 
so that it can be moved from place to 
place in the home or taken with a family 
when leaving a residence. 

Julie says another advantage of the 
ceramic art work is that it will never fade 
and the tile can be cleaned with any 
normal household cleaner. 

Julie's custom art work has been well 

received. In two years she recalls just one 

customer who after seeing the drawings 

decided not to have the art work 

completed. She charges no costs for a 

sketch and estimate of work including a 

sample tile and a fired custom color chart 

for potential customers. "I want them to 

be happy with what they are getting, and! 

find most are," she added. "I feel one of 

my best assets is my ability to read 

people and put together their tastes and 

personalties in a drawing that reflects 

them." 

Julie also prides herself that the cost 
usually comes out to less than many of 
the silk screen tiles available through I 
various catalogs. "Of course, price] 
depends on the detail and amount of 
work," she said. Individual tiles usually 
range from $10 to $50. Pedestal sinks 
generally cost $200." 

"I come alive when I put a paintbrush 
in my hand," she said emphatically. 
"With me you get the real thing. I like to 
meet my clients so mat I can get to know 
them and they can get to know me. I 
never want to be someone who manages a 
group of artists and lends her name to the 
finished work produced by them. If it has 
my name, I wanted to have created it." 








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Januarys, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 1 



I 






:' 




Lakeland's BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




Create a powerful program for pension alternative 



by ALAN NADOLNA 

Both businesses and in- 
dividuals can create a 
powerful lax-advantaged ac- 
cumulation program. This 
can replace or supplement 
an ERA or company pension 
plan for businesses. 

When most pension 
plans started, the adminis- 
trative costs and IRS 
regulations were far less re- 
strictive than they are today. 
Changes in the law 
concerning participation an 
discrimination have raised 



Personnel 



costs, created confusion, and 
lessened the benefits of the 
plan. 

There is an alternative to 
these problems with distinct 
features that favor the prin- 
cipals and key executives of 
any firm. 

The most commonly 
asked questions about this 
alternative plan: 

Are there administrative 
costs? Do you need IRS 
approval? Are there ERISA 
filings? Are there discrimi- 
nation rules? Is there a re- 



tirement are restrictions? 
Are there limits on contri- 
butions? Are there limits on 
retirement income? The an- 
swer to all of these is "no". 

Are the contributions 
tax deductible? Are the ac- 
cumulations lax deferred? Is 
there a pre-retirement bene- 
fit? Are sole proprietor- 
ships, professional corpora- 
tions and sub chapter S 
corporations eligible? The 
answer to these is "yes". 

The Pension Alternative 
(Selective Incentive Plan) 




Mary Jo Wignot 

Mary Jo Wignot, real estate 
broker with Re/Max Suburban of 
Libcrtyvilic attended the National 
Assn. of Realtors annual conven- 
tion held in Las Vegas. While 
there, Wignot previewed the 
state-of-lhe-art model homes 
which will be included in the Jan- 
uary National Assn. of Builders 
Showcase of Homes. Also at- 



tended were session regarding the 
economy, marketing strategies, 
and real estate investments for the 
90s. Wignot, a resident of 
Grayslakc, is a member of 
Re/Max President's Club, and a 
recipient of the Illinois Gold and 
Platinum awards in recognition of 
multi-million dollar annual sales, 
Wignot has been active in sales 
in Lake County since 1979. 

George Schau 

George Schau, P.E. has 
joined the firm as an associate 
member of the staff at RSK Con- 
sultants, Inc., Park City. Randall 
Kuras said that Schau's 15 years 
experience in Uic design and con- 
struction of municipal improve- 
ment projects as well as land 
planning and development is a 
welcome addition that strengthens 
the firm's project management 
capabilities. 

Stacey Tornatore 

Stacey Tornatore has been 
promoted to Personal Banking 
Officer at Bank of Northern 



Illinois, N.A. Tornatore, who 
also serves as Manager of the 
Libcrtyvilic Office, has been with 
the bank for a year and a half. 
Prior to that she spent five years 
al Wauconda National Bank and 
Trust Co. She is a member of the 
Libcrtyvilic, Mundelein, Vernon 
Hills Chamber of Commerce and 
a member of the Libcrtyvilic 
Math St. organization. Tornatore 
resides in Fox Lake. 

Kelly Robey 

Kelly Robey of Round Lake 
Beach has been named an agent in 
the Country Companies Lincoln- 
shire Agency, according to agency 
manager Van Buehler. The Country 
Companies are a group of compan- 
ies providing insurance and invest- 
ment products and services. As a 
Country companies agent, Robey 
is able to provide for all the insur- 
ance needs of area residents by of- 
fering auto, home, farm, life, disa- 
bility income, health, and com- 
mercial insurance, Robey will 
serve clients from the Country. 
Companies office at 1018 Weiland 
Rd., Buffalo Grove. 



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maximizes the personal use ual accepts funds from ihe control all investments it is 
of Tax Deductible corporate Plan, the age at which an not necessary to leave port- 
dollars. The goal is to use individual accepts funds folio management up to 
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This Way 
to wealth 



which an individual stops 
contributing to the Plan, 
how the individual receives 
the Plan disbursements, and 
even the ability to alter the 
Plan after it has been set in 
motion. 

At death, all benefits are 
income tax free to the 
beneficiary. In almost every 



future individual retirement 
income. This is similar to 
the function of a pension 
plan, but without all of the situation, retirement income Chicago, 



restrictions and red tape. 

As in a pension, all 
payments into the Plan are 
tax-deductible to the corpo- 
ration, and cash accumulates 
in the Plan without Lax. 
The Plan's greatest advan- 
tages versus the pension 
plan are that there are no 
discrimination • rules (all 
employees need not be cov- 
ered), and that the program 
has incredible flexibility al- 
lowing the Plan to be cus- 
tom tailored. 

Indeed, the custom tai- 
loring decisions extend to 
the amounts contributed, 
the age at which an individ- 



can be totally income-tax 
free. 

For individuals, the plan 
works exactly the same 
way, but initial contribu- 
tions are not tax deductible. 
This is a small sacrifice. By 
not getting a deduction on 
current contributions a 
$2,000 contribution gener- 
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individual can receive hun- 
dreds of thousands of dollars 
completely tax-free at re- 
tirement time. 

This powerful plan can 
be established so that the 
participant can direct and 



others. 

We will be happy to 
provide detailed information 
for any individual or busi- 
ness. Write us at our new 
address: Associates in Fi- 
nancial Planning, 100 S. 
Wacker Dr., Suite 1650, 
Chicago, IL 60606. 
Editor's Note: 

Alan Nadolna, 
is a 
consultant to financial 
service organizations 
and is a financial 
advisor to corpo- 
rations and individu- 
als. He is a member of 
a panel of financial 
experts preparing This 
Way To Wealth. Your 
questions are invited 
by writing to This 
Way To Wealth. Your 
questions are invited 
by writing to This 
Way To Wealth in care 
of this paper or 2203B 
Lakeside Dr., 

Bannockburn, TL 
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12 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



mmmievM 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 






Kenney DeCamp (with 
the moustache) bore 
gifts and goodwill to 
young victims of 
Chernobyl during his 
last visit to Moscow. At 
the left, DeCamp helps 
a new friend exercise. 
At the right, prominent 
Russian doctors Marat 
Vartanlan and Eugeny 
Trlfonov (In the white 
coat) accept medical 
supplies and other 
presents collected by 
Rotary International. 

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ussia with love 



s the winds of change blast from Vladivostok to 
Murmansk across the now defunct Soviet Union, 
the children of Chernobyl have not been 
forgotten. 

The children — who inherited a horrible legacy 
of disease and death following the nuclear 
disaster a half decade ago — have found a friend In Rotary Moscow in less than two years on behalf 



Kenney DeCamp, a member of the 
Dundee Township Rotary Club and world 
community service chairman for Rotary 
International, has made three trips to 



by GREG MILLER 



International. 

The worldwide arm of Rotary is rallying support 
ranging from toys to medical supplies to letters of goodwill 
for the children affected by the cataclysm. 



Gavin North reaches out 



The students at Gavin North School in "It's a combination of things. There 

take Villa have extended their goodwill have been tremendous; changes in what 

toward the children caught in the used to be the Soviet Union. This way the 

catastrophe that was Chernobyl; kids get Involved in history" 

As an adjunct to Rotary Internationai's The Gavin North effort comes under 

^Health to tlie Children" campaign and In the school's "Quest Skills for Growing tt 
an effort to establish a sister school, the ^pftgramM 

students have fired off around 200 mis* "One component is service," Splllncr 

slves. explained. "It Includes learning to reach 

"Every child in the school wrote a let- out t0 others whUc building up your own 

ter and included a little present and a 8C ]f. cs tecm and sense of self-purpose." 
photo of themselves," said Chuck SplUncr, . . : ) ;; +K „ w* A1 . c 

Gavin NorthprincipaL _ ™ e <*** s ^f *™> e * •* «£■ 

fpillner said he^hopes the letters will after hearing an inspirational talk by Ken- 

generateanexchangepVogram. ' Vf^^iS!!^'^ 

"We want to start corresponding and chairman for Rotary Intentional 

exchange pieces of Russian and American The postage for Gavin North's large 

culture/ Russia-bound package was paid by the 

But more than goodwill will grow from Fox Lake Rotary, DeCamp said.— by 

the project, Spiltner said, : CREG MIIXER 

r ■-■■'■ ■•■ ■■ "■ *■'■■■'■■■■'■■■> '•••••- ' •■-•••;.- 



jl 



of the organization and the Chernobyl vic- 
tims. 

DcCamp's latest trip was in August of 
1991, just five days after the end of the 
unsuccessful coup. He delivered gifts to 
the children at a mental health research 
institute on that sojourn. 

"I had mixed feelings," DeCamp said. 
"The warmth they display is unbelievable 
— the way they love and accept you, es- 
pecially because you're an American. But 
to see the devastation to the whole coun- 
try — your heart really goes out when you 
see the entire infrastructure crumbling. 
The Russian people have lived with such 
struggles for so many years." 

DeCamp said 400,000 children were 
directly affected by the accident at Cher- 
nobyl. Ten percent of those children are 
terminally ill from various forms of can- 
cer, with leukemia the most prevalent. 

Even the children who survive will 
never be the same, suffering the psycho- 
logical effects of witnessing family and 
friends die from radiation-related 
maladies. 

"Entire families were wiped out," De- 
Camp said. 

"Health to the Children" is Rotary In- 
ternational's program aimed at aiding the 
children. 



Hospital equipment — beds, 
wheelchairs and dental units — lead the 
list of big-ticket items already rounded up 
by the project. 

Medicine, clothing and therapeutic 
and educational items are also important, 
DeCamp said. For example, an area Osco 
donated a shipment of crayons fcr the 
kids. 

Any cash generated for the project 
goes for shipping costs. 

The program grew out of Rotary Inter- 
national's expansion into the Soviet 
Union, DeCamp said. 

Although the government gave its 
permission for the establishment of a 
Moscow Rotary club during the initial pe- 
riod of glasnost, the party handpicked the 
original 40 members from the camps of 
Boris Yeltsin and MikhaU Gorbachev. 

Oddly enough, however, one of the 
original 40 was an American living in 
Moscow. That man, Thomas Kaufman, is 
the stepson of baseball great Ted Williams 
and the owner of an International trading 
company. Kaufman also has been instru- 
mental in starting a Special Olympics 
program in Russia. 

There are currently four Rotary clubs 
in what was the Soviet Union — Estonia, 
Siberia, St. Petersburg (Leningrad) and 
Moscow. Another chapter Is planned for 
Kiev. 

Chernobyl itself Is a city created to 
house the nuclear reactor facility workers 
and their families. It lies in the Ukraine, 
which Is part of the newly created Com- 
(Contlnued on page 16) 



992 



Lakeland Newspapers 13 



January 3, 1992 



i 



• ■ : .■ 



If^S&^HU 



--„.■' - '- A-**- *«' 



LaJkelife 




1991-Taking the good wi th the bad 

Most of you probably thought Dec 31 was New Year's 
Eve. What you didn't know is that it was also "You're All 
Done Day." An organization called "The Long Haul 
Committee" — headquartered out of Chicago — officially 
deemed it so. According to them, it's .a day to 
acknowledge all that you have accomplished in the past 
| year and to savor the satisfaction of finishing a long 
i task. 

Ninetecn-ninety-one was a year of mixed blessings. 
Countries seemed to fight for freedom while suffering 
I through the responsibilities that Democracy brings. A 
I war was started and ended in the Middle East with 
questions lingering as to whether our mission was 
accomplished there. And while the world moved 
forward, America's economy seemed to stand still. Some of my friends lost their jobs and 
are still struggling to get through these grim times. For many, their long term 
accomplishment was just making it through the year. 

With the ushering in of 1992 and the Super Bowl three weeks away I though I'd sum 
up the year from a sport's perspective. Now I'm not an avid sports' fan so my highlights 
may differ from yours. 

Although the Cub's did poorly this year, there was one game I do remember. It was 
Wednesday afternoon on May 15. 1 was being rolled out of a surgical suite in Lake Forest 
Hospital. As I entered the room my husband stood proudly with our new baby boy in his 
arms. I could hear the Cubs on the television in the background, it was a home game at 
Wrigley Field. As my husband handed our son to me, Sandbcrg came up to bat. My 
husband took a peek. "I bet he'll hit it out of there," he said with a grin. The first time I 
held my little boy, Ryne Sandbcrg ripped a homerun to left field. My husband and I smiled 
at each other — 1991 was a year for cheer. 

While I'm not particularly an Atlanta or Minnesota fan, the World Series seemed 
significant this year. By most standards the odds were against these two teams. Each one 
was in last place in their respective leagues the previous year. But in 1991, they both 
advanced to meet each other in the World Scries. Maybe this was a statement to a country 
whose favorite pastime is baseball that hope should still prevail, regardless of our present 
standing, and that we can still be competitive in any arena. I guess for some underdogs, 
1991 was a good year. 

Not to dwell on the negative, but another significant event occurred on Dec. 17. That 
evening on the news, Michael Jordan was shown receiving the prestigious Sport's 
Illustrated "Sportsman of the Year Award" before a game against the Lakers. During that 
game, Jordan stole the ball, ran down court by himself, prepared to slam dunk, jumped up 
and completely missed. He actually looked awkward doing it. Later, Michael plainly 
admitted it was one of the most embarrassing moments of his life. 

I guess even the best ball players, people, and countries have a bad day, a bad month 
or even a bad year. But as Jordan says "Sometimes you gotta take the good with the bad." 
This, I believe, sums up the past year, —by MEL BADELL 








. 



Grandmother gives pointers 
on pathway to a happy life 

' Staying in touch with 

friends, keeping active, 

eating healthy and getting 

exercise are the keys to 

enjoying life to the fullest, 

said Lcnabclle Kapelke of 

Wauconda. 

At 72, she's lived through 

five wars and a conflict, 

nine children, countless 

recessions and the Great 

Depression. She has 
enjoyed her achievements as well 
as her plans and is cynical about 
nothing. 

Kapelke, president of the 
Wauconda-Island Lake Senior 
Club, was the cook at Crook's 
Restaurant in Wauconda which 
after a fire claimed the business 
became the drug store at Route Lenabelle Kapelke 

176 and Main Street. For eight years after that, she made potholders and sewed lace 
on towels at R.A. Briggs in Lake Zurich. At age 60, she retired from TV Lab in 
Wauconda where she put components on circuit boards. 

Quite simply, Kapelke is a pioneer of the "super mom" model. However, she 
describes herself as "a common ordinary person." Her motivation to do it all comes 
from a desire to help others, she said. 

It's also the reason why, once retired, she began volunteering. "If I can be of help to 
somebody, that makes me happy. I feel if we all did that, we'd have a better world to 
live in," she said. 

A couple of mornings a month Kapelke pulls herself together, arthritic arm and all, 
and moseys over to Wauconda Township Volunteer Services. For three hours at a 
crack, she calls people who arc unable to leave their homes and chats with them. If 
they require any services, she helps them got what they need. 

"I try to do unto others as I would like them to do unto me," she said. 
"(Volunteering) gives me something worthwhile in life to do. I worked for 25 years, 
then I stayed home. I found I had lots of time on my hands and felt I could give 
service to somebody else, and I enjoy doing it." 

A native of Brice, Texas who has lived in five states in the country, Kapelke and her 
(Continued on page 16) 




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H 



Uaa.WKMlxjivFrt Lunch 1 I 30-3:00 
Euly Gird 3:00-5:00 
Dinner 5:00-10 
Saturday Dinner 3-t0 
Bundiy Dinner 1-0 
Clated Tuoidey (Dining roam onty) 



DETAILS 



(708) 587-7933 

We served complimentary New 

Year's Eve Dinner to on-duty Fox 

Lake Paramedics & Rescue Squad. 



Reservations are suggested and appreciated. 







14 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



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eland Leisure 



| Folk Alliance 

The Fourth Annual Conference 
of the North American Folk Music 
and Dance Alliance will take place 
at the MaJborough Inn In Calgary, 
Alberta, Canada from Thursday, 
Jan. 30 through Sunday, Feb. 2, 
1992. This U.S. /Canadian organi- 
zation conference will feature pan* 
els and workshops, parties, an 
exhibit hall, jam sessions, group 
meals, and artist showcases. For 
more information about the Folk Alliance, 
call (919)542-3997. To be placed on the 
mailing list, write: Folk Alliance, P O. Box 
5010, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. 

•Celebrating America* 

The Lake Forest Symphony, di- 
rected by Paul Anthony McRae, 
will present "Celebrating Ameri- 
can," "a special program designed 
to celebrate America through 
works that embody the spirit, di- 
versity and energy of our great 
land," on Friday, Jan. 10 and Satur- 
day, Jan. 11. Doth performances 
will begin at 8 p.m. and will be 
held in Rhoades Auditorium, 



Chicago Medical School, 3333 Green Bay 
Rd., North Chicago. Single tickets are $25 
per person. Group and student discounts 
are available. For tickets call the Lake 
Forest Symphony at (708)295-2135. 

iBowen auditions 

The Bowen Park Theatre 
I Company In Waukcgan announ- 
ces auditions for its Feb. 28 
through March 14 production of 
Joe Orton's farce "What The Butler 
[ Saw." Auditions will be held o Jan. 
13 and 14 at 7 p.m. at the Jack Ben- 
ny Center for the Arts, 39 Jack Ben- 
ny Dr., Waukegan. Four men be- 
tween the ages of 20 and 50 and 
two women, one in her twenties 
and the other in her forties, are needed for 
this production. Interested persons 
should call (708)360-4741 for an appoint- 
ment. 

Kirk players to perform 

The Kirk Players continue their 26th 
subscription series season with the up- 
coming production of "The Haunting of 
Hill House." Performance dates are Friday 
and Saturday, Jan. 10 and 1 1, at 8 p.m. in 
the Mundelein High School theatre 



located at 1350 W. Hawley St. All proceeds 
will be donated to the Lake County 
League of Women voters. Ticket prices are 
$5 for adults, $3 for students and senior 
citizens, and children under twelve are $2. 
Tickets are available from representatives 
of the Lake County League of Women Vot- 
ers, the Kirk Players or can be purchased 
at the door. For further information, call 
John Lynn at (708)566-6594. 

Andre's launches season 

Andre's Steakhouse and Rosebud Pro- 



ductions will launch their fifth dinner/ 
theatre season with the comedy, "Cookin' 
With Gus," by Jim Brochu, on Saturday, 
Jan. 4. This production, which will run un- 
til Saturday, Jan. 25, Is about a talented, 
camera-shy cook who uses hypnosis to 
give her courage to launch her TV career 
as a new Julia Child. Andre's is located on 
U. S. 12 in Richmond, 111., just south of the 

Wisconsin border. Dinner/theatre infor- 
mation and reservations can be made by 
calling (815)678-2671. 





Theat 



|Cross-country skiing workshop 

Volo Bog State Natural Area, 28478 W. Brandenburg Rd., Ingleside, will hold a 
[cross-country ski workshop for beginning skiers ages 20 through adult from 9:30 
a.ra to noon on Sunday, Jan. 5. Call (815)344-1294 for more information and to 
I register. 

| Animal tracking at Volo Bog 

The Volo Bog, 28478 W. Brandenburg Rd., Ingleside, is sponsoring a family 
I program on how animals walk on Sunday, Jan. 12 at 1 p.m. Participants, ages five 
through adult, will learn animal prints and track patterns and explore the habitats 
near Volo Bog. Call (815)344-1294 for reservations. 

'Victory holds new sibling class 

Beginning in January, Victory Memorial Hospital, 1324 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, will 
hold "A New Baby Is Coming" sibling class the third Saturday of each month from 9 to 10 
a.m. For additional information and to register call (708)360-3000, ext 5218. 

Northlake Singles hold dance 

The Northlake Singles will hold a dance at 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 10 at the Antioch GoJf 
Course in the banquet room. All singles, ages 25 to 45, are invited and all ladies will be 
admitted free of charge. For more information call (708)587-0702 or (708)395-5833. 

Volo Bog by moonlight 

The Volo Bog will sponsor "Volo Bog by Moonlight" for children, ages eight and above, 
and adults on Saturday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. Participants will experience the sites and sounds 
of the bog on a clear, moonlit night For reservations call (815)344-1294. 



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Greats 



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10 WEEKS TILL SPRING 

START YOUR LANDSCAPE 

PLANNING EARLY. 

Rt. 120 and Cedar Lake Rd., 3 mi. west of Grayslake 

(708)546-5160 



Never Cruised Before? 
Answers to 
Most-Asked Questions 

by JIM WARNKEN, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

There is nothing I hate more than to walk into a specialty 
store to buy an item of which I know nothing about and having 
the sales person assume I know just what I want. 

Unfortunately we in the travel industry sometimes forget 
that not everyone has cruised before as we asked what 
category cabin a client wants or assume he knows he doesn't 
have to pay for his food on board ship. 

So for those of you who have never cruised, here is a list of 
questions most asked by first-timers: 
Q. What is included is the price I pay up-front? 
A. Your cabin, all meals, entertainment, shipboard activities 
and use of all the ships facilitiles. Most cruises also include 
airfare from your home city and transportation to and from the 
airport to your ship. 
Q. What is not included. 

A. Drinks, tips, shore excursions and port taxes. Tips are 
up to you, but figure about 5 8 a day. Shore excursions are 
offered for a fee, but you may just want to explore on your 
own. Port taxes are paid before your cruise and currently run 
about '60 for a seven night cruise. 

Q. What is the difference between the more expensive 
cabins and those in the budget category. 

A. Size, location and bedding arrangement. Cabins run 
from two room suites to closet sized rooms with upper and 
lower bunks. Outside cabins, those with windows, are more 
expensive. Cabins on the higher decks will also cost you 
more money. Don't worry. The lowest decks are still well 
above the waterline. 

Q. Will I still get the same food and entertainment as the 
rich folks in suites if I get a budget cabin? 

A. There was a time when cruising offered first and second 
class cabins with separate dining, show lounges, etc. Now all 
passengers share the same facilities. The only difference in 
cabin costs is the cabin itself. 



WBMSr/IK TMV£l, MC. 




We Can Answer The Questions Your Best Friend Can't. 



For matters of the heart, soul and shopping 
mall there's no beating that constant source 
of so-called objective advice, your best friend. 
But for serious matters of health, we suggest 
a more qualified source of information. 
ASK-A-NURSE? 

Like a friend, we 1 re available 24 hours a day. 
Our registered nurses can provide answers to 
health-related questions and give you referrals 



to physicians and health services. Whether 
you're calling for yourself, your kids or your 
entire family. Think of it this way. You trust 
your best friend to always lend a 
helping hand. And you can 
trust ASK-A-NURSE to give 
you the warm, friendly, 
healthcare help you need. 




ASK-A-NURSE 

(708) 244-5900 



Your Source For Healthcare Answers 4 " 




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Lakeland Newspapers 15 



January 3, 1992 



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Kapelke — 

(Continued from page 14) 

family came to Wauconda in 1957 from a 
small town in Wisconsin. "Work got 

Chernobyl 

(Continued from page 13) 

monwealth of Independent States. 

"Many people have moved back to the 
contaminated land — they have no place 
else to go," DeCamp said. 

He added that a foundation has been 
formed to help relocate the Chernobyl 
refugees. 



scarce there and my children were 
growing up and wanting to get jobs. So we 
came to Illinois where there was more 



The Moscow Rotary is funded by the 
Evanston chapter, which includes the in- 
ternational headquarters for the organiza- 
tion. 

Evanston is part of "Home District" 
6440, which includes 62 Rotary clubs in 
Lake County and Chicagoland. 



Radke wrote about outdoors, travel 



Private funeral services were held for 
William Radke, 73, prominent outdoor 
and travel writer, who died Dec. 21 in 
Hines Hospital after a long battle against 
encephalitis. 

His column, Travels with Col. Bill, 
was a fixture in Lakeland Newspapers for 
nearly 20 years. The column also 
appeared in a number of suburban 
newspapers. He wrote his last columns 
in October. 

Mr. Radke was a resident of 
Brookficld where he was director of 
parks and recreation before his 
retirement. He and his wife, Ruth, also 
maintained a summer home in Fox Lake 
until two years ago. 



, Col. Bill was known throughout the 
midwest and parts of Canada for his 
fishing accounts. Mr. Radke was a 
prominent figure at outdoors shows in 
Chicago. The Radkes were widely 
traveled. Col. Bill never wrote about a 
place unless he had visited it personally. 
He also handled public relations and 
advertising for midwest resorts. 

A native of Riverside, he served in 
the European Theater during World War 
II. 

Memorial services will be held 
Saturday, Jan. 1 1 in Brookficld. 

Also surviving are two daughters, Jill 
Malik of Cicero and Elizabeth Moburg of 
Lake Forest, and a grandson, Jason. 



Home Grown Girl Made If I 

Look Who's Selling Florida 






Liz Biederer of ERA Airport Realty in Orlando is 
specializing in Commercial, Investment, and Home Sales. 

Leave your snow shovels behind! 
Come see me fn the Sunshine State. 

(407) 380-6661 
ERA Airport Realty 

5425 S. Semoran Blvd. Suite 2 Orlando Florida, 32822 



NOTICE 

Until Further Notice Dino's Den will 
reduce their entire menu prices by 10%! 

EVERYDAY-7 DAYS A WEEK. 

From 11 a.m. till midnight. 
SENIOR DISCOUNTS ALSO APPLY 



Introducing Our 

NEWLY REDUCED DAILY 

BREAKFAST SPECIAL PRICES 

FROM 6 A.M.-11 A.M. 



88 E. Grand Ave. 
Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-6604 

Excludes All Bar Beverages 



work," she said. Kapelke spent most of her 
youth in Waukegan but said she didn't 
want to return there "because I wanted 
them to have a smaller community to live 
in. 

"I think you have a different 
relationship with people in a smaller 
community than you do in a big area. I 
like the school system, and the people are 
very friendly and nice," in Wauconda, she 
said. 

A member of the 485 Grandmothers 
Club in Wauconda, Kapelke finds time to 
make porcelain dolls, crochet and knit. 



J| 



Her life, she said, is everything she 
wanted. "I'm pretty happy doing what I 
do," she said. 

The real gem of life, beyond the 
telephone which "makes the world seem 
awful small sometimes," is keeping in 
touch with friends. The richness of life, 
she said, comes from "a closeness of 
companionship and feeling that you have 
someone you can relate to if you have 
problems. You have someone to go to. 
There's always a shoulder to cry on and an 
ear to listen, and vice versa. Friendship 
means an awful lot to me," she said. — by 
DEBRA A. SCHWARTZ 



Enjoy slapstick hum or during 'Rumors 1 

IF-a-r-c-e: A theatrical composition in 
which broad improbabilities of plot 
and characterizations are used for 
Ihumorous effect. 

Neil Simon's "Rumors," making its 
I Chicago-area premiere at Candlelight's 
Forum Theatre in Summit, fits that 
(dictionary definition to a "T." 

Eight couples, in formal attire, gather 
Ion after the other to celebrate the 10th 
anniversary of a New York polltician- 
lexcept their host is sidelined by a 
gunshot to the earlobe and his wife has 
disappeared. Neither appears on stage during 
the entire performance. 

The servants are gone and the food is in 
the kitchen uncooked. 

Each couple seeks to cover up the situation The cast of "Rumors" 
from those yet to arrive, trying to keep a lid on what looks like a possible suicide attempt 
by their host. But the stories get more and more complicated and bizarre as the evening 
progresses, culminating with the arrival of the local police who arc just as confused. 

"Rumors" is rife with mistaken identities, quick comings and goings and slapstick 
humor, including one scene where seven guests are crawling on the floor looking for 
missing earrings that turn up in a most unlikely place. 

Co-directed by Wyatt and William Pullinsi, "Rumors" is scheduled to run through Jan. 
12. Information is available at (708)496-3000.— byTOM WITOM 




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ia Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



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Newspapers 






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Lokclniul 



Bridal Extravaganza 




When modern love bridges the f age gap 1 dilemma 



When Cupid takes aim 
at a man and woman, he 
doesn't always examine 
their vital statistics first 
That's why some brides 
find themselves 
marching down the aisle 
to marry grooms who are 
significantly older — or 
younger — than 
themselves. While age is 
seldom an obstacle to 
these couples' love has a 
a subtle yet strong impact 
on marriage. 

Some of the special 
challenges that lie ahead 
for these "age gap" 
couples: 



Parenting: A bride may 
find her "biological clock" 
ticking much faster, or 
louder, than her groom's. 
Older women are often 
eager to have children 
long before their 
husbands feel ready to 
become fathers. 

A younger woman who 
marries a man with 
children from a previous 
marriage may find that 
her desire to start a family 
right away isn't 
reciprocated. And the 
pressure can come from 
him, too — especially if 
he's older and wants to 



spend time with his 
children while he's still 
young, healthy and 
energetic. 

Money: Should money 
be spent on momentary 
pleasures, or invested to- 
wards a secure and 
comfortable future? Older 
and younger partners' 
views often clash when it 
comes to cash. 

Health: Concerns for a 
partner's health invade 
every marriage, and they 
can be particularly 
troublesome if he or she is 
much older. A younger 
wife may find herself 



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nagging her husband and 
to have regular check-ups, 
watching what he eats, 
and worrying if she'll be 
alone when she gets 
older. 

Cultural background: 
People who grew up In 
the fifties, sixties or 
seventies often have 
dramatically different 
perspectives on 
everything from politics to 



morality to humor. Even 
finding music that both 
partners enjoy dancing to 
is a challenge to some 
"age gap" couples. 

Spending time with the 
other's friends can be 
disorienting, too. when 
they seem more like 
parents (or children) than 
peers. 

Jealously: Jealousy Is 
seldom an issue early in 



the marriage. But a 
partner who turns 40 
while the other is barely 
30 may fear that he or she 
will begin to look for a 
more youthful com- 
panion. 

Couples who learn to 
respect each other's 
differences rather than 
challenge them will find 
that love overcomes many 
contradictions. 



Engaging ways: then and now 




You're engaged, and 
suddenly everyone's got 
advice for you — your 
mother, his mother, 
friends and relatives, 
perhaps even 
grandparents. They all 
mean well, but as a bride 
of the nineties, you have 
the freedom to do things 
your way. Engaged 
couples of just a 
generation ago followed a 
much stricter code of 
wedding "rules" than do 
brides and grooms right 
now. Today, you can 
choose to follow the 
traditions that mean most 
to you, and tailor the rules 
to suit your style. 
Proposal 

Then: The groom 
asked the bride's father 
for her hand. 

Now: The couple 
decides to marry, and the 
proposal may be 
dramatic, a diamond in 
champagne glass, the 
words, "Will you marry 
me?" flashed across a sta- 



dium scoreboard. News of 
the engagement Is FAXed 
to family and friends. 
Invitations 

Then: Invitations were 
formal, engraved, and 
issued by the bride's 
parents. 

Now: Invitations reflect 
the spirit of the 
celebration. They may be 
etched on glass, printed 
on hand-painted cards, 
collaged from 
memorabilia of the 
couple's courtship, 
lettered on scrolls. 
Bride 

Then: The bride's full- 
time job was to work on 
wedding details with her 
mother. 

Now: Career-minded 
brides don't let wedding 
planning disrupt their 
jobs. Weekends and 
lunch hours arc prime 
planning time, and an 
increasing number of 
professional brides-to-be 
hire a wedding consultant 
to handle the specifics. 



Groom 

Them All that was ex- 
pected of him was to show 
up on the wedding day. 

Now: He takes part in 
planning his wedding, 
interviewing 

photographers, screening 
bands and helping select 
the wedding menu. 
Cake 

Then: The bride's cake 
was a white, tiered 
confection with white 
frosting, and a plastic 
bride and groom on top. 

Now: Cakes are 
creative works, decorated 
expressly to complement 
the wedding theme. 
Flavors are for so- 
phisticated palates — 
spice, carrot, cheesecake, 
lemon, orange, chocolate 
mocha, and sometimes 
all of them at once. 

To top it off, couples 
choose something 
special: a pair of crystal 
swans, a miniature flower 
basket, or a custom-made 
bride and groom . 



m 



Eva's Bridal & Fashions 
of Buffalo Grove 

Spectacular January Sale 

iH 15% to 20% Off All 

Wedding Gowns And Bridesmaid Dresses 



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(not applicable to previous sales) 



[■ v 



2B Lakeland Newspaper! 



January 3, 1992 



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Lakeland 



Bridal Extravaganza 




Couples' sleep life can affect marriage 



"Don't go to bed an 
gry" is sound advice 
commonly given to new- 
lywcds, but what about 
problems that arise in 
bed? Sex aside, sharing a 
bed requires meshing of 
sleep styles that are often 
totally different And, un- 
less compromises can be 
worked out, the bed can 
become a battleground, 
putting a strain on the 
relationship and robbing 
both partners of the sleep 
they need. 

Your sleep life affects 
your marriage as much as 
your sex life does. If you're 
not sleeping harmo- 
niously together, and one 
or both partners is not 
sleeping well, it will have 
a profound impact on 
your daily activities and 



your relationship. 

The first step in build- 
ing better night's sleep is 
to take a closer look at the 
bed you share. It's difficult 
for either of you to get a 

good night's sleep in an 
old, worn-out mattress. If 
the mattress is more than 
eight to 10 years old, It 
probably is too old to pro- 
vide the optimum sleep- 
ing environment. 

Many couples often 
make the mistake of 
sleeping on a bed that is 
too small to accommo- 
date the nightly tossings 

and turnings of two in a 
bed. People normally 
change position 40 to 60 
times during the night, 
Including a dozen full- 
body turns. And, studies 



show, each time one part- 
ner moves, the others 
moves within 20 seconds. 

Disruptions can keep a 
person from getting the 
needed amount of restful 
sleep. It takes at least 10 

minutes of undisturbed 
sleep before deep delta 
sleep can develop, and if 
you're disturbed during 
that period, the clock 
must start all over again. 

For maximum sleep- 
ing comfort, couples need 
a klng-or queen-size mat- 
tress and foundation. A 
bigger bed won't stop you 
from snuggling when you 
want to, but it will prevent 
you from being disturbed 
every time your partner 
changes position. A dou- 
ble bed provides only as 



much room as two baby 
cribs. You need to allow 
enough sleep space for 
both of you to move freely. 

Once you've elimi- 
nated the bed as a source 
of nightly skirmishes, fig- 
ure out ways to compro- 
mise sleep habits and 
idiosyncrasies that are not 
compatible with your 
mate's. For example, if 
your partner keeps you 
awake reading or watch- 
ing television in bed, a 
high-Intensity reading 



light or television ear- 
phones should help. You 
could also try eye shades, 
earplugs or a "white- 
noise" machine. 

If your biological 
clocks aren't in sync, go to 
bed at different times. 
Trying to force sleep when 
you aren't tired is likely to 
cause insomnia. Keep in 
mind also that a spouse 
that snores heavily is no 
joking matter. It may be 
the symptom of a serious, 
but often treatable, condi- 



tion called sleep apnea. 
Whether you need a 
new bed, a set of earplugs 
or a visit to a sleep disor- 
der center, it will be worth 
whatever investment it 
takes to ensure that your 
sleep life together is a 
good as It can be. When 
you're both getting the 
rest you need, you'll have 
the energy, the sense of 
humor and the perspec- 
tive to deal more effec- 
tively with other relation- 
ship issues. 



Avoid wedding day mishaps 



You can spend an 
entire year planning your 
wedding day down to the 
letter, but unless you have 
a fairy godmother, there's 
no way to guarantee that 
the day will be perfect 

If you organize an 
"emergency kit," and keep 
it stashed nearby at the 
ceremony and the 
reception, coping with 
certain last-minute 
dilemmas will be a 
breeze. 

•Needle, thread, 
buttons, and safety pins. 

•Extra stockings for 



you and your wedding 
party. 

•Spot remover. 

•Nail polish— color to 
match your fingernails, 
and clear to keep stocking 
runs from spreading. 

•Extra lipstick, 
powder, blusher, 
eyeshadow, fragrance. 

•Comb, brush, and 
hairspray or gel. 

•Extra pairs of glasses 
or contact lenses. 

•Tissues and cotton 
balls. 

•Personal care items. 

•Pen and note paper. 



•Extra copies of all 
passages that are being 
read during the 
ceremony. 

•Telephone numbers 
of your caterer, 
clergymcmber, organist, 
photographer, florist, 
bandleader, car service, 
and each member of the 
wedding party. 

Keep in mind the most 
important ingredients of 
all; patience and a sense 
of humor. 

They'll turn any 
mishap "mountains" back 
into molehills. 




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(708)740-6836 ^ 






*7our Hours of Unlimited 'Beverage _ , 
Service with (Premium (Brands ■ ^to±.^J^_ 
•Large Selection of 'Entrees to Choose (From 
•Unlimited Wine Service throughout (Dinner 
•CandelaSrafor fHeadlaSle 
•Champagne 'Toast for t Hzod c Iahk 
•Wedding Coke from Our In-house (Bakery 
•(Bridatdtgom 

•Complimentary d^pom for (Bride andQroomM "The (Hotel 
•(Reduced (Rates for your Out-Cf-Tozm guests at the (Hotel 

CaCCthe bedding Specialists 
5572 W. Grand, Gcirnee 

662-2929 



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1 





(708)395-1203 
Fax. 395-4232 



Biller Press offers a collection of 
wedding invitation designs, 
programs, napkins and many more 
personalized accessories and gifts. 

Bring this ad in for 

10% Off 

on your wedding order! 

BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 

966 Victoria Street, Antioch 



>) 



V 



Suddenly you've found that you're a tittle Sit round. 
Suddenly you fed tktyoukave a little less zeal. 
Suddenly your utiggk is causing a giggle, and 
the tops of your thigh Have gone up a vhk size. 
Don't Despair 

fierelȣcs Unlimited, Inc. 

has arrived in Grayslake 
January Special 
$ 30 for 30 Days 



Bring in 
this ad 

2visits=$6 

one time only 



GETTING 
BEHIND? 

888 B. Belvidere, Suite 120, Grayslake 223-8820 



WathlogtOD 



L»!t* County M 
Fairgrounds * 




Lakeland Newspapers 3B 



January 3, 1992 



— -mf? - _ , . 



i 



1 







ukchuul 



Bridal Extravaganza 




What to expect when buying a wedding gown 



So many questions, so 
many details, so many 
emotions — It's no wonder 
even the most organized 
bride-to-be can feel over- 
whelmed and anxious 
about finding the perfect 
wedding dress. Knowing 
what to expect before she 
steps into a bridal shop 
can help put her mind at 
case. 

Answers to the most 
common dilemmas faced 
by brides-to-be are: 

When should the 



bride start shopping for 
her gown? 

Begin the search six to 
eight months before the 
wedding, since it can take 
manufacturers up to six 
months to fill an order, 
with alterations taking 
several weeks on top of 
that. 

What homework 
should she do first? 

Look through bridal 
magazines, marking the 
pages with gowns she 
loves. Don't rip them out, 



bridal stores need to know 
the page and 

manufacturer to locate the 
style number. Also keep in 
mind the time and site of 
the wedding, since a dress 
appropriate to a garden 
ceremony will look out of 
place in a cathedral. 

What should the bride 
bring with her for her first 
appointment? 

Although most shops 
offer sample 
undergarments for try- 
ons, a smart bride will 



Duette. Making 
Your World a 
Shade More 
Elegant... 

A luxurious new woven fabric collection with the 
lustrous look of fine silk, Refined, 
Sophisticated. Elegant. Al home in your 
most formal settings. 

All Blinds & Shades 
on Sale Now 



Call Off the Wall Interiors for complete 
Interior design service, custom draperies, 
furniture, wall coverings & coordinating 
accessories, 

Making The World a 
Shade More Beautiful. 






(708)395-3341 



By 



HurrterDouglas 



D.UETTE 



< Beauti- ( Uue (Products 

CMu«rt*rDcM|lmW,ndo-fml.<i«l Wt 




Free Continental 
Breakfast 

Outdoor Poof 

Free Cable TV 
HBO/ESPN 



•Movie Rentals 
Available 




Cays Inn Richmond/Geneva Lakes Area 



Richmond, IL (Adjacent to Andre's Restaurant/Lounge) 
Mention this ad to receive our special offer. 



(81 5) 678-471 1 







Romance Has Returned! 



Exquisite Boudoir Portraits 
for Wedding, Engagement or 
Valentine's Gifts! 



It you're unaccustomed lo compromise, call (or a private 
consultation to view our unique wedding photography. 
References available. 







--'■:■: 



Guaranteed to make you 
look magnificent! 



Call Today! 

STUDIO INC. 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

S 356-9432 



bring her own lingerie 
and shoes: a strapless bra 
or bustier, slip in a neutral 
shade, white hosiery, and 
shoes in different heel 
heights. 

How much will she 
have to pay "upfront"? 

Many shops expect a 
non-refundable, 50 
percent deposit when the 
dress is ordered, with the 
balance due either 30 days 
later or when the bride-to- 
be picks up her gown. 
While dress prices differ 
greatly, shop owners 
estimate that the average 
cost is between $1,000 to 
2,000, and alterations will 
average from $50 to 500. 

What about "moving 
up" the wedding date to 
ensure that the dress 



arrives in time? 

Many brides are 
tempted to try this, but the 
experts advise against it, 
pointing out that 
reputable bridal stores 
deal only with manu- 
facturers they trust, and 
that lying may be coun- 
terproductive. For ex- 
ample, if the bride has her 
heart set on a gown that 
takes a long time to order, 
the sales consultant may 
rule it out because the de- 
livery date cuts It too close 
to the wedding. 

What if the bride is in a 
rush? 

Larger stores can often 
accommodate last minute 
bridal shoppers, placing 
rush orders for gowns to 
arrive in three to eight 



weeks. But brides should 
expect to pay a surcharge 
for this service. 

Are there any cost-cut- 
ting ideas for the bride-t- 
be on a tight budget? 

Many stores will have 
sample dresses on sale, 
especially if a line has 
been discontinued. 

What if the bride's 
weight changes before the 
wedding day? 

Weight fluctuations 
(and brides on diets) are 
common. Don't buy a 
dress in a size you hope to 
be. If the bride gains 
weight Just before the 
wedding and her dress no 
longer fits, the shop may 
be able to get extra 
material from the 
manufacturer overnight. 




1/ 



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Anniversary gifts 



First year — paper 

Second year — cotton 

Third year — leather 

Fourth year — electrical appliances 

Fifth year — silverware 

Sixth year — wood 

Seventh year— woolens 

Eighth year — linen and lace 

Ninth year — leather 

Tenth year-— tin 

Eleventh year— fashion jewelry and 

accessories 

Twelfth year — colored gems 

Thirteenth year— textiles 



Fourteenth year— gold jewelry 
Fifteenth vear — watr.hps 



ruimeenui year — goia jewelry ' t 
Fifteenth year — watches t 

Sixteenth year— silver hollowware 
Seventeenth year — furniture 
Eighteenth year — porcelain 
Nineteenth year — bronze 
Twentieth year— linen 
Twenty-fifth year— silver 
Thirtieth year— pearl 
Thirty-fifth year— Jade 
Fortieth year — ruby 
Forty-fifth year— sapphire 
Fiftieth year— gold 
Sixtieth year— diamond Jubilee 




# STEAK &SEAF 




STEAK & SEAFOOD HOUSE 

11106 US Rt. 12 N. P.O. Box L 

Richmond, IL 60071 

(815) 678-2671 

You have enough on your mind on that Special Day, so 
leave your Wedding Reception to us. 

Andre's Makes that Special Day a Bit More Special 
With Excellent Food & Service of the Highest Quality! 

Take Your Choice of Dinner Service... 
•Family Style -Buffet Style individual Sit-Down 
Bar Options Available Include Your Choice of... 

•Cash -Tape Ring -Open -Bottle Bar 

' —Or, Take Advantage of Our Package Dcal- 
(Dlnncr, 4 1/2 hours of open Bar & 1 boltlc of Wine per tabic) 



Don't take chances with your 
Wedding Cake either.. .Our Bakery 
Chef is a •master' at his work. 
Wedding Cakes are his specialty! Or, 
spice up your reception with a 
beautiful sweet table. 

Select Dates are Still Available 

Call for an appointment 

or additional information 

All Prices Include: Room Host, 
Waitresses, Bus Persons, Bartenders, Of- 
fice Personnel, Kitchen Staff, Room Set- 
up, Valet Parking, Linens, Etc. 



on which* I,y loc*ai>tl 

next floor to 
Oa vs Inn. Itichiiioiifl, 




48 Lakeland Newspapers 



January^, 19?2 



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Bridal Extravaganza -j 



Best time to entertain in-laws 




If there is such a tiling 
as the "best" time to 
entertain in-laws for the 
first time, most newly- 
weds tend to wait until the 
first major holiday to ar- 
rive before playing host 
and hostess to their new 
family. However, a sub- 
stantial number of in-laws 
(18 percent) will jump the 
gun and invite themselves 
over without waiting until 
the holidays, or being 
asked. 

An entertaining in- 
laws survey was designed 
to determine how Ameri- 
can newlyweds face the 
challenges of entertaining 
for the first time. A re- 
search market telephones 
1,000 married men and 
women across the country. 
It is natural for a young 
couple with little experi- 
ence in playing host and 
hostess to wait until a 
family- oriented time be- 
fore inviting their in-laws 
into their home for the 
first time. Entertaining 
during a major holiday 
takes away some of the 
pressure of providing 
guests with an excep- 
tional, memorable 
evening. 

For future couples 
'destined to entertain their 
in-laws for the first time, 
relax and be yourself was 
the most popular advice 
given by the survey's re- 
spondents (60 percent). 
Similarly, 32 percent also 
recommend that, when it 
comes to preparing the 
meal, new hosts and 
hostesses should keep it 
simple. 

When asked to 
characterize their experi- 
ence in entertaining in- 
laws for the first time, two- 
thirds of the survey's total 
respondents chose happy 
ending movie titles, such 
as "It's a Wonderful Life" 
(34 percent) and "Terms of 
Endearment" (12 percent). 
The remaining third of all 



respondents, however, 
chose movie titles with 
decidedly less "warm and 
fuzzy" connotations: "The 



ety" and "The Good, The. 
Bad, and The Ugly" (10 
percent for each). Twice as 
many men as women 



Odd Couple," "High Anxi- | were apt to choose the 



movie title "Never On 
Sunday," while twice as 
many women as men 
could relate to the movie 
title "Frantic." 









y 



For unforgettable food in a 
charming setting, have your 

RECEPTION 

at the 











^or spur jgperial <Bati— 

(Eratte's 

Picture 

perfect 

309 C , McHenry Road 

Long Grove, Illinois 

(708)913-1300 



QUALITY WEDDING 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

FOR THE DISCERNING BRIDE 



in Historic Long Grove 




PtJO/>, 




"**fre*> 




Accommodations from 75 to 200 

Party Planners A vailable 



wa 






lire ^txix&ztxlt pSall 

Grayslakej Illinois * 
qfie fBest (Buffet In Totim 

♦Private Parties to 300 IJP 

►Flexible Service At 
Affordable Prices 

•Weddings And Other Banquets 

♦Business Meetings 
And Fundraisers 

ALL KINDS OF PARTIES! 

(708)223-6900 

yourneut Hosts 

HENRYand 

CATHERINE deGROH 



: 




he Tower Room 

750 Hwy. 173 • Antioch.IL 



Come See Out 
0\(ewtif-<Decorated(Rgom... Wfc 
It's 'Beautiful 1 . 

DECEMBER 
WEDDING SPECIAL 




:> 



95 

per person 

Includes 4 Hours Open Bar, 
Hors D'oeuvres, Champagne 
Toast & Unlimited Wine With 
Dinner. Choice Of 2 Entrees, 
Potato, Vegetable, Salad. Cake 
Service. Linens & China. 




Call Today! 

(708) 395-1193|l|[j 



£ 




314 Old McHenry Rd. 
Phone 634-3833 





Lakeland Newspapers 5B 



Januarys, 1992 



mm 



■ 



•*. , JL-.VJ. 



•ju&SSOBX 








*£ Bridal Extravaganza 

- 

ow to be a radiantly beautiful bride 




You arc getting mar 
ried and you've planned 
the world's most perfect 
wedding! Now's the time 
to prepare for an impor- 
tant aspect of the big day, 
a personal radiant and 
memorable look. After all, 
the centerpiece of every 
wedding is the beautiful, 
fresh-faced, natural bride. 

With the wedding 
around the corner, there's 
no time like the present to 
get started. Remember 
not to stray too far from 



your own special look — 
guests are supposed to 
remember the bride, not 
the bride's makeup! here 
arc some helpful tips: 

Practice makes perfect*. 
Bridal beauty, like every 
other facet of the wed- 
ding, is a matter of careful 
planning. Start now to ex- 
periment with different 
makeup looks, remem- 
bering that every eye (and 
camera) will be focused 
on the bride that day. 

Strive for a look that 



complements the overall 
concept chosen for the 
wedding. If the theme is 
romantic and frilly, make- 
up should be soft and very 
feminine. If the style is a 
more streamlined, sophis- 
ticated wedding, try for a 
more glamorous look. 

Start with foundation: 
Shade and formulation 
arc equally important. A 
translucent, water- based 
foundation with aloe vera 
is ideal because it evens 
the skin tone beautifully 



«ty(D 




^ik 



We "Aim" To Rent Everything 



Your Bridal Party Headquarters 

-Party Tents •Canopies 

Gazebos & Arches 
<^ •Tables & Chairs 
Q •Champagne Fountains 
jL • China & Flatware r 

Linens 



351 W. Main St. 
Lake Zurich, IL 




but feels lighter than air. 
Be sure to match founda- 
tion shade to face and 
neck— not to hands or 
arms. Blend with long, 
even strokes, using a 
slightly dampened 
sponge wedge, and top off 
with a light dusting of face 
powder to set the makeup 
and help it last. 

Water, water every- 
where: If being happy 
makes you cry, you can bet 
you'll shed a bucket of 
tears on this day. That's 
why it's important to wear 
a waterproof eyeliner and 
mascara. A dual-purpose 
waterproof pencil that 
works as both an eye-liner 
and brow pencil can be 



Just the ticket. Choose one 
that's especially designed 
to match hair color for a 
more natural, finished 
appearance. 

Complete the look 
with a lash extending wa- 
terproof mascara in a 
complementary shade, for 
the prettiest, driest lashes . 
that last even through 
tears of joy. 

Lasting Up color. Beau- 
tiful lips arc certainly ne- 
cessary on the wedding 
day, and it's a good idea 
to select a lip color that 
lasts. This is one occasion 
when there won't be too 
many opportunities for 
touch-ups. A powder-and- 
gloss combination that 



comes with its own mir- 
rored compact is one lip 
product that keep lips 
looking soft and lustrous 
even after kissing the 
groom and sipping 
champagne. 

A final word of advice: 
Make sure makeup Is ap- 
propriate for the quality of 
light where the wedding 
vows will be said. If it's an 
outdoor wedding, choose 
a look that works In natu- 
ral light; for evenings, se- 
lect makeup shades that 
are appropriate for sub- 
dued artificial light. On 
this day of all days, radi- 
ance and a natural, fresh 
look are what should be 
strived for. 



A perfect cake for a perfect day 



For an extra special 
wedding, every detail 
counts. Everything from 
your dress right down to 
the cake should be ex- 
pressly for you. 

So, make each deci- 
sion a thoughtful deci- 
sion. Find the right per- 
son or bakery to make 
your cake by comparing 
samples of their work and 
by tasting, too! Ask 
questions. Can a 
strawberry filling be 
added? Will a whipped 
cream frosting hold up? 
And, how will the finished 
cake be delivered? 

Once you select a 
baker/ decorator, don't 



settle for a carbon copy of 
a cake made for a previ- 
ous wedding. Instead, 
provide ideas so that your 
cake is designed especial- 
ly for you and your groom. 
Start with an ornament 
you love and pair it with 
fresh flowers keyed to 
your color scheme. Or, 
personalize your cake 
with a special frosting 
flavor. 

Another beautiful way 
to individualize a cake Is 
by coordinating your own 
cake ornaments and ac- 
cessories. Combine expert 
detailing with fine porce- 
lain, laces and trims in an 
exquisite selection of wed- 



ding cake ornaments. 
Each ornament can be 
mixed and matched with 

fresh flowers, greenery or 
any other accessories. 

Wedding cake orna- 
ments are available to fit 

any style. Choose from 
graceful swans floating on 
lace, gentle doves amidst 
tulle and soft roses, wed- 
ding bands with shim- 
mering pearls, and many 
more. For the classic cake 
topper, the wedding cou- 
ple, you might select a 
flowery base, a pearl- 
trimmed arch or a lattice 
gazebo. 



I 



it 




i H:an n i no; a wi: Dpi nc;Td( )n t m i ss th i 

II II l-ARCil SI imil)APmKAV/\c;ANZA IN THE MIDWCST 



i Send me tickets to the show at the 


I Enclosed it $ (at '5.00 per ticket) Wedding Date 


Name 


| Address 


i City State 


Zio 


I Home Phone Work Phone 




L 



ENCLOSE CHECK OR MONEY 
ORDER AND MAIL TO: 

VOLLE'S BRIDAL 

53 S. OLD RAND RD. 

LAKEZURICHJL 

60047 

OR 

RESERVE BY PHONE 
CALL 

(708) 438-7603 



Here Comes the Bride 



Stunning dresses for the entire bridal party. 

Beautiful bridesmaids, mothers and 

flowergirl dresses, too! 

JJk fBiidal Sfapne «* R ^ offin „ Rd 

c a% a" Long Grove, IL 

a,Mautiqu£ 708^34-2550 



1 



6B Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



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How to avoid common honeymoon pitfalls 



Terry, a bride-to-be 
from Cincinnati, had al- 
ways dreamed of a 
Caribbean honeymoon 
spent strolling along ro- 
mantic beaches and 
shopping in open-air 
markets. Her finance, Eric, 
had set his sights on the 
roulette wheels and 
heartshaped hot tubs In 
Las Vegas. So, to "be nice," 
Terry agreed to take a 
gamble. Big mistake. She 
got trumped instead of 
suntanned— and she 
blamed Eric. 



A honeymoon should 
be the trip of a lifetime, 
for both partners. But so 
many expectations and 
emotions are built into 
the experience that, with- 
out a few precautions, it 
can become a minefield 
of disappointments. 

Following are tips to 
avoid the most common 
honeymoon pitfalls: 

1. Be honest with each 
other. If you go along with 
your mate's choice to ap- 
pease him or her, it can 
lead to quarrels and re- 



sentment later on. In- 
stead, work together to 
find an agreeable com- 
promise. A honeymoon in 
Aruba, Puerto Rico, or St 
Maarten would have let 
Eric try his luck while 
Terry sunned and 
shopped. 

2. Don't expect non- 
stop romance. Since it will 
take time to wind down 
from all the wedding ex- 
citement, make intimacy 
and fun a priority. 

3. Don't forget your 
sense of humor. Honey- 



Personalized Consulting 

For Your Individual 

Taste And Budget ®j 

For Your Free Consultation 
Visit Our Private Bridal Loft 

fig. FLOWERS & BALLOONS 



moons take place in the 
real world, where waiters 
spill soup and luggage 
can go astray. Laughing 
through the bumps will 
get your marriage off on 
the right foot 

4. Don't try to do too 
much. Five Hawaiian is- 
lands in one week Is 
madness. A better idea Is 
to spend the first few days 
relaxing and rediscover- 
ing each other, then ex- 
plore nearby sites and 
cities. 

5. Feel free to spend 
some time away from your 
partner. Scout out the lo- 
cal cafes or collect shells 
along the beach while 
your partner naps or scuba 
dives. 

6. Don't under-budget. 



Even if you're heading for 
an all-inclusive resort, put 
together a contingency 
fund— you don't want to 
arrive t the airport short of 
the $10 departure tax you 
need to get home. 

7. Check with a travel 
agent or tourist bureau to 
find out which official 
papers (visa, passport, 
birth certificate) are re- 
quired for your destina- 
tion well before your de- 
parture. And be sure that 
all travel documents, In- 
cluding your tickets, are 
accurate, up to date, and 
in hand at least one week 
before you leave. 

8. Let hotel staff know 
that you're honeymoon- 
ers. They may offer 
champagne, invite you to 



a newlywcds' cocktail 
party, or even upgrade 
your room to a suite. No 
need to shy away fro so- 
cializing, either — other 
honeymooners might key 
you in on hidden trea- 
sures, such as a local 
nightclub or secluded 
cove not mentioned in 
the tourist manuals. 

9. Be prepared for on- 
site expenses. If you've 
used credit cards to cover 
pre-wedding costs, be 
sure you're well enough 
under your credit limit to 
pay for honeymoon pur- 
chases. Also, don't over- 
look small expenses — 
such as international 
phone calls, gift-shop 
items, and laundry ser- 
vice—which can ambush 
your budget 



Tips for a perfect wedding reception 



vsg. 



135 E. Liberty Street (Rt. 176) 
Wauconda 

708-526-5300 



Ki^HnB 



1. Get organized. Make 
lists of things to do and 
check off each task as it Is 
completed. Consider hir- 
ing a professional wed- 
ding consultant to assist 
you In your planning. 

2. Set budget guide- 
lines. Remember that 
keeping costs in check 
doesn't necessarily mean 
sacrificing quality. 

3. Coordinate the date, 
time and place of your re- 
ception an strive for a 
harmonious balance. 

4. Be sure that adequate 
insurance coverage is pro- 
vided in case of an acci- 
dent, whether you are 




renting or borrowing a fa- 
cility, or hosting the affair 
in your awn home. 

5. Arrange contracts 
with hired professionals. 
Seek recommendations 
from family and friends 
for the caterer, florist, 
band leader, and pho- 
tographer. 

6. Make every effort to 
allow for the opportunity 
to speak personally with 
each guest. Take advan- 
tage of the simplicity of a 
receiving line, or be sure 
to mingle among the ta- 
bles after the meal. 

7. Provide for the en- 
joyment of your guests 



.. ... .... .,.-, 



with a spacious setting, 
delicious food and pleas- 
ing music. 

8. Personalize your 
wedding reception with 
table arrangements of 
your favorite flowers, a 
menu with some your fa- 
vorite foods, and rendi- 
tions of your favorite 
foods, and renditions of 
your favorite songs for lis- 
tening pleasure or danc- 
ing. 

9. Provide each guest 
with a memento of the 
day — a printed place card 
or a special favor. 

10. Enjoy yourself. 



f 



PASTA 





"Imagine tbe pastabllitles..." 




Have Your Own Personal 

pljef prepare Your Meal 

...Worry free... 

In 3L $%», Casual, 

Conjfortable Setting! 



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9, 



Specialize In Private Parties, 
Rehearsal Dinners and Showers 

We'll Set Up A Pasta Bar 
Right In Your Home! 

Includes: 3 Sauces starting At 

9-Veggles $^95, 

3 Fresh Pastas • ^ /P«* person 

Salad, Rolls, Dressings 







-V* 1 * c» 



*$<< 



id. 








Si* 



v» 



.«*> 



■&£ 



Pyt 






iV 



o 



O 



"rflie tiedCtfty fflurnative 




K open daily n a.m. China and Silverware Provided 
mon.-sat.ii-9 FREE- No Cleanup 



CaU Far Mare Infarmatian 

PASTA MAKERS 

127$. RAND RD M LAKE ZURICH 
LAKEVIEW PLAZA 

(Lakeview Plazajiext door to" the Natural Food Store) 

C708J 438-1811 



*-** 




3.1992 



Januarys, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 7B 



' 



EBSSSfiSS 






I 



u 




anza 



Wedding footnotes with fancy accents 





Today's bridal fashions 
are as diversified as the 
woman of the 90's. Indi- 
vidual expression is the 



new focus: Brides can 
choose styles that are 
whimsical, glamorous or 
traditional for their wed- 



ding theme. And, the ac- 
cessories they choose to 
complete the look can 
make the difference be- 
tween looking good and 
looking sensational. 

Choosing the right 
shoes that complement 
the total look is easier to- 
day then ever. Styles in- 
clude plain satin, floral 
tapestries, lace-on-satin 
and ornamental treat- 
ments. 



Follow these hints for 
choosing the best 
footwear accents for the 
bride and her attendants: 

•Choose a comfortable 
heel height. There are a 
variety of fashion styles 
available in high, 
medium and low heel 
heights. 

•Try on the shoes at 
gown fittings. The height 
of the heels will affect the 
skirt length. 

•Break In new shoes by 



wearing them around the 
house for a few hours at 
least a week before the 
ceremony. Scuff the soles 
a bit to avoid slipping 
down the aisle. 

•When having shoes 
dyed-to-match, bring a 
swatch of material from 
the dress. Allow 72 hours 
for dying. 

•For a dressier look, try 
a floral tapestry design or 
lace-on-satin dyeables. 
The lace dyes lighter than 



the satin for a contrasting 
effect 

•Add pizzazz to a plain 
pump with a rhlnestone 
or pearl clip-on orna- " 
ment. 

•Satin dyeable mary- 
janes with a swivel strap 
or strapless skimmer are 
available for children. 

No matter what theme 
the bride chooses the se- 
cret behind a joyous and 
flawless wedding is plan- 
ning ahead. 



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8B Lakeland Newspapers 




■ 







'Marriage pact 1 is cure for wedding aftershock 



Soon you'll be married' 
and like most newlyweds 
you'll probably feel a bit 
disoriented. No matter 
how wonderful your mar- 
riage is, it won't be exactly 
what you expected. Some 
things will be better then 
you hoped and some 
things will be, well, just 
different. 

The culprit Is wedding 
aftershock — the disorien- 
tation that occurs when 
the reality of married life 
is at odds with our expec- 



tations. Wedding after- 
shock can result in mis- 
understandings, hurt 
feelings and occasional 
choas: 

It's little comfort to 
know that all couples en- 
counter some amount of 
post-wedding trauma. 
Even when misunder- 
standings are amusing, 
it's disquieting to know 
you're not completely in 
sync. 

Most wedding after- 
shock can be avoided with 



planning. Unfortunately, 
most couples spend more 
time selecting their china 
than they do planning 
their marriage. 

That may soon change, 
thanks to a book Avoiding 
Wedding Aftershock or I 
Like You Even Better Now 
That I Know You by Char- 
lie Michaels with her hus- 
band Mike Brown. This 
book helps couples pre- 
pare for married life. 
While most prenuptlal 
counseling focuses on the 



big picture (life goals, 
moral issues, should you 
marry), this book helps 
couples develop a com- 
mon set of expectations 
for the day-to-day aspects 
of married life. 

Individuals respond to 
a series of questions on 
such topics as "Morning 
Routines" and "Things 
you can do to show me 
you're sorry." 

Answers are then 
shared and agreement 
reached on how differ- 



ences will be handled. A 
list summarizing shared 
expectations becomes the 
couple's Marriage Pact. 

Thoughtful imple- 
mentation of your Mar- 
riage Pact will eliminate 
many misunderstandings 
and make it more likely 
that both of you will get 
what you want from mar- 
riage. It will also elimi- 
nate the tendency to role 
play. 

When you love some- 
one, it's natural to want to 




be your best for them. For 
many, that means trying 
to be the ideal spouse. 
The catch is that your Idea 
of ideal will probably vary 
significantly from that of 
your spouse. Creating a 
Marriage Pact will give 
you the confidence of 
knowing what will make 
each other happy. 



jd 




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Flowers to match wedding color scheme inside the dome. 
•Free Gift boxing 

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CRYSTAL CREATIONS* 

24321 W. Route 134, Round Lake HOURS: 

(708) 546-3222 Tuesday-Friday 12-6 

Saturday 10-6 
Sunday 10-5 Closed Monday 



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Banquet Facilities 

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• Wedding Receptions • Bridal Showers 

• Rehearsal Dinners • Seating to 150 Persons' 

720 IV. Milwaukee Ave. 

Gurnee 

For Information & Reservations 

Call 



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353 



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LET US BE YOUR PARTY RENTAL CENTER 1 

Dishes, Flatware, Glasses, Champagne Fountains 

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Beer Coolers, Table Linens 

Punch Bowls, Candelabras 

Canopies, Arches 

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SAT. 8:00-5:00 
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Route 120 

1/2 mile west of Hainesville 

Round Lake Park, IL 

(708) 740-8800 



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a variety of price packages 
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•superb cuisine 
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•available 365 days 
•mornings, afternoons, 

evenings, nights 
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►2 outdoor patios 
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»rlchly decorated 
surroundings 



1290 S. Milwaukee, Libertyville 
Just North of Hawthorn Center 

(708) 362-1290 



January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 9B 



*m* 



'-£«~ ',£, 



fit Bridal Extravaganza 

-.■Smimivn- -■ - ■ ■: ■■:--■-■---,■: ■ : . ' ■■ V^/. ■--■■■■■■- - . ■ ' ' ;- ■■■, 

Cultured pearls for a cultured bride 




Several millennia ago, 
legend has It, a great 
Hindu god dove into the 
sea to acquire a single, 
exquisite pearl as a gift for 
his daughter on her wed- 
ding day. Today, that leg- 
end has been absorbed by 
many cultures around the 
world and has become a 
tradition that is genera- 
tions old. 

The pearl, a symbol of 
love and purity, is per- 
fectly fitting for the bride. 
Its lovely and magical ap- 
pearance has captured the 
hearts of brides for cen- 



turies. Neither gaudy nor 
flashy, the pear! possesses 
an ethereal and demure 
personality that reflects 
the warm glow of a bride 
on her wedding day. 
Once, due to their 
scarcity, natural pearls 
were reserved for only the 
very wealthy. But about 80 
years ago, man discovered 
the secret of how to coax 
oysters into producing 
enough pearls to put 
them within the reach of 
all. Such a pearl is now 
termed "cultured," and 
although it is helped into 



maturity by man, it is still 
considered as fine a gem 
and a very close cousin to 
the natural pearl. 

Just as nothing should 
be faked on the wedding 
day, the Jewelry to be 
worn should be as real as 
the emotions felt on this 
memorable occasion. 

To make sure that the 
bride has the right cul- 
tured pearls to suit her, 
there are several factors to 
remember. 

When selecting cul- 
tured pearls, choose the 
best quality you can af- 



ford. Look for pearls that 
have a bright, clear luster 
and a deep inner glow. 
Try to select pearls that 
are relatively free of no- 
ticeable surface blemishes 
such as cracks, bumps or 
blisters, which can detract 
from the overall beauty 
and shorten the life of 
pearl. 

When selecting pearls 
for the bride, matching 
the length and style of 
pearls to a particular gown 
design is important. One- 
to three-strand princess or 
choker length pearl 



necklaces best accentuate 
off-the-shoulder or 
scooped-ncck gowns and 
help to frame the face as 
well. High or closed neck 
gowns call for longer 
strands of pearls to create 
a slim and smooth sil- 
houette. 

When it comes to se- 
lecting pearl color, 
women with lighter hair 
and fair complexions end 
to look best in cultured 
pearls with a slight rose 
tint, while creamy off- 
white hued pearls com- 
plement darker hair and 



skin tones. However, it is 
best to match pearl color 
to individual skin tone by 
actually placing the pearls 
against the skin and see- 
ing the effect 

Just as cultured pearls 
are perfect for the bride, 
they should also be con- 
sidered for the bridal 
party to give a matching 
appearance. Inexpensive 
pearl earrings or bracelets 
are perfect gifts for 
bridesmaids, and pearl 
cufflinks or shirt studs are 
perfect gifts for ushers. 



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Located in Saratoga Square 

5101 Washington Street 

(corner of Washington & Rt. 21 ) 

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Why Settle For Just Any Cruise? 

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on 1992 7-day Winter/Spring Caribbean Cruise... 

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Restaurant 
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Weddings 

• Rehearsal Dinners 
• Office Parties 
• School Reunions 
• Breakfast Meetings 
• Meeting Rooms 

Accommodations for up to 250 



A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE™ 
me Nicuw Amsterdam - 7-day Western Caribbean Discovery Cruise. .. 
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£ me Wcatcrdam - 7-day Eastern Caribbean Getaway Cruise... 

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• St. Thomas • Nassau 
■ Sailing dates: January 4-- April 1 1 , 1992 

Tcittu and Conditions: Offer b vilid until January 15, 1992. Appliei only to lelected publlihedair gateway ciliei. Part charge of '69 arc 
additional. Offer b capacity controlled « J may be withdrawn at my time. Ship'* registry: Netherlands AntUlei, Bahama*. 

GURNEE TRAVEL 

120 NORTH ROUTE 21 • 1 BLOCK SOUTH OF WASHINGTON STREET 

708-623-1919 

Your Honeymoon Travel Specialists 

Let our expert, well-traveled staff 

help you with that most important detail... 

...YOUR HONEYMOON! 

We have packages from two nights 
to Round-The- World cruises. 

We do take appointments. So if it's 
only a hotel, Las Vegas, Hawaii, a 
cruise or the Caribbean, 

CALL - WE OFFER THE WORLD 



Barn Loft East 

travel agency 

1333 Detww- Suits 900 
Gumw. Illinois 

(708) 249-4994 



Barn Loft North 

travel agency 

277 Route 173 

Antloch, Illinois 

(708) 395-9050 




■■W'4fll' 



S A 4j<t+t± * 



Complimentary Room For The Bride & Groom At 

The Best Western Hitch-Inn Post Motel and 

Complimentary Brunch The Following Morning 

At Buckley's Restaurant 



Stop in or give us a call for 
more information 

Rt. 137 (Buckley Road) & Milwaukee Ave. 

Llbertyville 

Adjacent to the 

Best Western Hitch-Inn Post Motel 

(708) 367-8088 



tm 



La Sposa Elegante 



A 



Planning the wedding of 
your dreams is a very exciting 
time. We, at La Sposa Elegante, 
would like to- assist your 
planning by inviting you to visit 
our bridal boutique. We have 
the latest styles of bridal 
gowns, bridesmaid gowns, and 
gowns for mothers. You will 
enjoy our personal service, so 
please call for an appointment 
soon. 

3006 Roosevelt Qd 
Kenosha, WI 
414-652-9293 



10B Lakeland Newspapers 




January 3, 1992 



■ • ■ 



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Lakeland 



Bridal Extravaganza 




i 

! 
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rides need time-saving, space-saving appliances 



Choosing the right 
products for a first home 
in be overwhelming, 
torn sheets and towcis to 
una and crystal, from 
tall electric appliances 
id kitchen gadgets to 
)ts and pans, there are 

so many different de- 
sions to make! 
Many brides-to-be opt 
the help of a bridal 
u'stry coordinator at a 
retail store. These 
lew home" experts have 
[en trained in the pros 



and cons of many prod- 
ucts by the manufacturers 
and through trial and er- 
ror as they use the items 
tli cm selves. Bridal registry 
coordinators can help 
match china, crystal and 
silver patterns, locate 
towels in just the right 
color and help choose the 
kitchen appliances that fit 
each couple's lifestyle. 

When choosing items 
for a first kitchen, most 
bridal experts recom- 
mend that couples look 



for space-saving sets of 
pots and pans with time- 
saving features like a non- 
stick interior. Clean-up 
will be quick, which is 
important.for today's busy 
dual-career family. 

Kitchen gadgets, knives, 
bakeware and casseroles 
should also be chosen 
with versatility, ease of use 
and storage needs in 
mind. 

The same considera- 
tions should be put into 



place when choosing ap- 
pliances for a first home. 
The first decision that a 
couple should make is 
what type of food prepa- 
ration they will be doing. 
A couple needs to deter- 
mine exactly what appli- 
ances they will truly use. 
Asking for, and receiving, 
every gadget and appli- 
ance available is silly, es- 
pecially if most of them sit 
unused in a cabinet. 

Choose appliances 
that serve more than one 



function which will save 
space and money for a 
newlywed couple. While a 
couple that doesn't cook 
often may only need a 
toaster, a small cof- 
fecmaker and a blender, a 
couple that cooks (or en- 
tertains) several times a 
week will need more. An 
all-in-one appliance is 
just the thing. One motor 
base that serves five func- 
tions (a blender, a mixer, a 
doughmaker, a food 
processor and a 



slicer/shrcdder/saladmak 
er) can be a true space- 
saver. 

Brides-to-be should 
not be afraid to be as spe- 
cific as possible when in- 
dicating the color, style 
arid brand name of the 
items they choose. Most 
wedding guests don't 
want to play a guessing 
game when choosing a 
gift for a favorite couple. 
They prefer to know ex- 
actly what a couple would 
like to receive. 



hampagne — romantic tradition 



Champagne is the 
JSbst romantic of wines. 
:lte sparkling effervescence 
Coasts the sweetness and 
hope of new marriage, the 
• celebration of life's suc- 
cesses, the arrival of tiny 
new lives, the anniver- 
saries of love. 

It's a time-honored 
tradition to toast the new 
bride and groom with a 
shimmering glass of 
champagne or sparkling 
wine. And champagne 
can add a festive elegance 
to your wedding in many 
ways: 

•Add sparkle to your 
wedding table with bright, 
shiny confetti and glittery 
metallic ribbons en- 
twined In the flowers and 
tied to the chalrbacks. 
Have your florist create 
table arrangements using 
champagne buckets or 



clusters of graceful cham- 
pagne flutes. 

•Consider champagne 
as gifts for the bridal party 
and anyone else who 
helped smooth the way 
for & perfect wedding day. 
A bottle of champagne 
with a champagne bucket 
(and perhaps one of the 
new champagne stoppers) 
will let them relive the 
happiness of your wed- 
ding with their own spe- 
cial someone. 

•Don't assume good 
champagne is too expen- 
sive for your wedding 
budget. There are many 
excellent and reasonably 
priced sparkling wines 
from California from 
which to choose. 

•Why not serve cham- 
pagne throughout the 
wedding meal? It will add 
to the festive feeling of 



your special day. Cham- 
pagnes and sparkling 
wines are excellent ac- 
companiments to food, 
especially light fish and 
poultry dishes with cream 
sauces. 

•Give special guests — 
mom, dad, grandma and 
your favorite cousin — 
corks from champagne 
popped for the occasion. 
Mark the corks: "Mary and 
Joe's wedding day," with 
the date, for a wonderful 
wedding memento. 

And when the wed- 
ding's over, champagne 
can help the romance live 
on. Plan to make cham- 
pagne a part of your mar- 
ried life. Create your own 
champagne traditions, 
and keep the spark alive! 
Champagne and 
sparkling wine can en- 
liven any celebration, 



A ntioctx 

XTLGolf Club 

Distinctive Banquets For All 
Occasions! 

• Receptions • Meetings 

• Rehearsal Dinners • Golf Outings 

• Showers • Special Occasions 

Rooms to Accommodate 10 to 300 People 

ELEGANT COUNTRY CLUB SETTING 

WEDDINGS OUR SPECIALTY 

Call (708) 395-4800 

40150 N. Rt. 59, Antioch • Open to the Public 



/ 1 ■ ^ - 



' J 



■. 



Holleb/ 







Holleb's will help you 
celebrate the perfect 
wedding with all the 
thoughtful and gTacious 
services you've come to 
expect. 

For symbols of good taste 
with attention to detail 
Hollcb's welcomes you to 
the perfect wedding. 

Call (414) 694-3500 for your 
personal consultation. 

Pershing Plaza, Highway 50, Kenosha. 

Daily 9:30-9, Tucs. & SaL 'till 5:30 

(414)694-3500 



'$W. 






^towers to rnalqz your 



Ifei -■' special day e?(pra speciaC\ 



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•Fresh 
•Silk 

•Accessories 
•Center Pieces 



Ralph's Florist 
81 Greenhouse 



2 Locations To Serve You 
Over 40 Years Of Service To The Community 



ION. Forest 
Fox Lake 
587-8244 



1 1 South Fairfield 

(1 mile South of Rt. 134) 

Round Lake 

546-2185 



It's Your 
Shining 

Moment 

Let Images kelp you Coofi 
your very Best! 

*We offer a complete line of 

bridal toear and 

accessories. 

Competitive prices. 

'Excellent personal 
attention. 




FASHIONS (^/ & BRIDAL 



Hours: 

M&Th.lO-8 

T, W, F 10-5:30 

Sat. 9:30-4:30 

Appointments Appreciated 



600 Main Street 

Corner of 6th & Main 

Racine, WI 

414-632-6626 






ss§ 









Januarys, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 1 IB 



..... . . .. . : :; 



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Bridal Extravaganza 




Reveal personality through shape of diamond ring 



For centuries man has 
attempted to access per- 
sonality through tea 
leaves, astrological 
charts, and even bumps 
on the head. Now here's a 
new twist In order to re- 
veal whether a person is 
creative, aggressive, sen- 
sitive, earthbound or 
dreamy, look at his or her 
favorite diamond shape: 
round, oval pear, mar- 
quise or emerald cut. 

Over the years, veteran 
jewelry appraiser Saul 
Spero has developed a 
"personality profile" of 
individuals selecting di- . 
amond engagement rings 
by observing a direct cor- 
relation between the 
shape of the diamond 
desired and the person's 
character. 

The credibility of 
Spero 's observations is 
based on psychological 
precepts, confirms Dr. 
Frederick Koenig, profes- 
sor of sociology at Tulane 



Univ. "There is a solid ra- 
tionale behind Spero's 
observations. When a 
person selects a particular 
geometric shape, that 
person gives expression 
to an inner impulse, it is a 
revelation of the inner 
self." 

How does it work? 

If you like the round 
shape best, husband, 
children and home life 
are terribly important to 
you. You're content, de- 
pendable, and relate eas- 
ily to others. You eagerly 
anticipate all the com- 
forts and joys of marriage 
and motherhood. Even if 
you work, a career is not 
your uppermost concern. 

The security of home 
and family (suggested by 
the round portion) is also 
very meaningful to some- 
one who selects the pear 
shape. But you're eager to 
meet new people and 
embark on new experi- 
ences (indicated by the 



tapered end). You're am- 
bitious, want to keep up 
with your peers and urge 
your mate to do likewise. 

Docs the oval shape 
diamond appeal to you? 
Chances are you love to 
innovate and arc fully in 
your element when you're 
being creative. You're or- 
ganized, but not inflexi- 
ble, and have a unique 
sense of your own style. 
You dare to be different, 
but are not "far out." The 
oval personality is a 
blend of the round, 
square/emerald and 
marquise. 

Someone who prefers 
the marquise shape is 
outgoing, impulsive, 
sometimes temperamen- 
tal, sexy and known to be 
"a charmer" (depicted by 
two tapered ends). You 
thrive on new challenges 
and your partner must do 
the same to keep up with 
you. Your energies need 



the outlet of a career and 
you're compelled to 
achieve your potential. 
You savor excitement and 
don't like to be "cooped 
up" at home. 

A bit conservative, 
disciplined and orga- 
nized, describes someone 
who favors the orderly, 
angular square or emer- 
ald shape. Often your 
mind wins out over your 
heart. You think things 
over clearly before mak- 
ing decisions. You also 
have good executive and 
leadership capabilities. 

Diamond shape, or 
"cut," is just one of the 
all-important "Four C's" 
that should be consid- 
ered when buying a 
diamond, advises 
Jewelers of America (JA), 
the national organization 
dedicated to consumer 
information and 
education about fine 
jewelry. Diamond values 
are also based on carat 




weight (there arc 142 
carats to an ounce, and 
100 points to a carat); 
color (the amount by 
which a diamond devi- 
ates fro the whitest possi- 
ble, or truly colorless); 
and clarity (determined 
by taking into account the 
number, size, placement, 
color and nature of any 
internal "inclusions" or 
external surface 
irregularities). 

How much should you 
plan to spend? Jewelers 
of America recommends 
a two months' salary 
guideline that will not 
adversely affect your 
budget but reflects a 



reasonable allowance for 
a better quality diamond 
solitaire. After all, unlike 
cares, stereos, furs and 
VCRs, this is a one-time 
purchase that lasts a life- 
time and becomes a fam- 
ily heirloom! 

It is important, there- 
fore, to make your dia- 
mond purchase based on 
cut, clarity, carat weight 
and color. Because every 
diamond has its own 
characteristics, and not 
two stones are exactly 
alike, JA recommends 
that you consult with a 
local diamond expert, 
your neighborhood jew- 
eler whom you know and 
trust. He or she will be 
able to guide you, based 
on your likes and dislikes, 
to the best value for your 
money. 

A diamond engage- 
ment ring is symbolic of 
your love and lifelong 
commitment to one an- 
other. 



v . 



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(Brida( r E?ctravajjanza (Directory ^^^fe^*! 



Lakeland 



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RACQUET HMXS 

ANDRES STEAK HOUSE 
11106 R 1. 12, Richmond, IL • (815) 678-2671 

MADISON AVENUE RESTAURANT 
34 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan, IL • (708) 662-6090 

(Up to 150) 

PRIVATE AFFAIRS BANQUET HALL ON LONG LAKE 

On Lake Shore Dr., Ingleside, IL • (708) 587-9100 

(Accommodations from 50 To 200) 

OLDE STRATFORD HALL 

54 Seymour, Grayslake, IL 60030 • (708) 223-6900 

(Facilities for 300 Guests) 



■i x-^x*xxx-x*x-x-x-x-x*x-xx- xxxxx^x *' 

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UJiMWAK-MA 



FLORAL ACRES 
40870 N. Route 83, Antioeh, IL • (708) 395-1211 

SOUTHTOWN FLORISTS 
810 S. Lake (Mundelein Commons), Mundelein, IL ■ (708) 566-9090 



XXXXXvXX 



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FOLGERS FLAIR WITH HAIR 
68 E. Grand Avenue, Fox Lake, IL • (708) 587-7292 

HAIR STUDIO • 
955 Victoria, Antioeh, IL • (708) 395-1119 
Jeff Merles 

BRH>AI>SHOP 

THE BRIDAL COTTAGE & BOUTIQUE LTD. 
409 N. Front Street, McHenry, IL • (815) 385-5588 

SILK-N-HA2 BRIDAL SALON AND TUXEDO RENTAL 
136 Center St., Grayslake, IL • (708) 223-3166 • 

BRXDAI, SHOW 



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SHOWCASE FOR BRIDES BY VOLLES BRIDAL & BOUTIQUE 

January 7, 1992 at the Woodfield Hilton Towers, 

Arlington Heights • (708)438-7603 



FORMALLY YOURS, 
286 Hawthorne Village Commons, Vernon Hills, IL • (708) 680-8777 

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ANTIOCH TRAVEL AGENCY 

Specializing in Honeymoons 

42,5 Lake St., Antioeh, IL • (708) 395-0665 

nsvn!A3no]SES 

BILLER PRESS 
966 Victoria St., Antioeh, IL • (708)395-1203 

LAKELAND PUBLISHERS 
30 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL • (708)223-8161 

PHCWDOGRAPHir 

BARRY DOWE PHOTOGRAPHY 

Lake County's Finest Wedding Photographer 

210 N. Lake Ave., Lake Villa, IL • (708)356-8136 

POPOVICH PHOTOGRAPHY 
3701 W. Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL ■ (708) 249-1234 

PORTRAITS BY THOMAS 
Specializing in Fine Wedding Photography & Video 
557 N. Hough St., Barrington, IL • (708) 381-7710 



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PARKWAY CATERERS OF LIBERTYVILLE 
712 S. Milwaukee, Libertyville, IL • (708) 362-4232 



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KEMPER CENTER 
6501 3Rd Ave, Kenosha, Wl • (414) 657-6005 

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SARAH'S CLEANERS 

Cleaning & Alterations (Heirlooming Available) 

34177 N. Rt. 45, Third Lake, IL • (708) 223-2250 



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RAM RENTAL 
325 W. Belvidere., (Rt.1 20), Round Lake Park, IL ■ (708)740-8800 

TAYLOR RENTAL 

Renting from 5 to 5,000 

3621 Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL • (708) 662-0005 



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3567 W. Grand Ave., Gurnee, IL • (708) 263-0400 

FOX LAKE TRAVEL 
37 E. Grand Avenue, Fox Lake, IL (708) 587-4242 

TRANS-AIR TRAVEL 
754 N. Green Bay Road, Waukegan, IL • (708) 360-0077 

FOCUS VIDEO 
Custom Taping for Rehearsal Dinners, Ceremonies and Receptions 

(708) 356-6831 



- - ••■ 



12B Lakeland Newspapers 



■ • 



January 3, 1992 



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Bridal 
Extravaganza 




rends in bridal party attire 




For the wedding-party, 
Egresses are short, flirty, 
mlashed with playful! 

prints or saturated in 
candy colors (shoes are 

^Ijyed to match). Separates 

Huso swing into the season 
with romantic sheer 

|ltjlouses atop ballerina- 
length skirts. Best-dressed 

'--buys: 

• Fabrics — organza, 
Hptton, Lycra™, taffeta, 
reembroidered or stretch 
lace, tulle, chiffon, otto- 
man, faille, linen. 

I • Prints— polka dots, 
gingham, stripes, plaid, 
exotic flowers. 

[ • Separates — Lycra™ 
or organza blouse with a 




sweeping skirt of taffeta or 
cotton with a self-sash or 
belt. 

• Short dresses made 
in chiffon-like fabrics (in 
yellow, pink, lavender, 
mint, pale blue) that float 
down the aisle. 

• Open backs with 
crisscross straps. 

• Short dresses with 
detachable tulle overs- 
klrts. 

• Iridescent taffetas In 
sherbet shades (mint, icy 
blue, yellow). 

• Patriotic colors — sol- 
id blue, blue with white 
stripes, red jersey top with 
red taffeta bell skirt and 
blue sash. 



Formal wear for the 
groom, best man and ush- 
ers go high fashion with 
lustrous fabrics and a vari- 
ety of colored accessories. 
The fashion focus: 

• Fabrics — luxurious 
silky fibers. 

• Black with subtle 
flecks of red, pink, green 
or burgundy. 

• White and ivory din- 
ner jackets remain strong. 

• Lapels— peaked, 
shawl, notched. 

• Tailcoats stay in the 
spotlight. 

• Accessories — bold 
colors, stripes, and florals 
for ties, vests and cum- 
merbunds. 








presents 



"The Wedding Show" 




ADMISSION "3.00 



edding traditions do change 



It's traditional in the 
nited States for the par- 
ents of the bride to cover 
the entire cost of a cou- 
ple's wedding. But this 
situation is changing. 

\ For the first time, 
■title re's a definite trend 

^toward the sharing of 

itWedding expenses. The 
groom's family, as well as 

■rthc bride and groom 
themselves, are taking on 

*afchunk of the financial 
responsibility. One reason 
for this may be changing 
attitudes toward the na- 
ture of the marriage. In 
this era of liberation, a 
bride's parents are no 
longer considered to be 
."marrying off" their 



daughter. Rather, the 
wedding is seen as the 
joining of two people, and 
two families, with every- 
one contributing to the 
festivities. 




The actual dividing up 
of the costs can be done in 
several ways. An easy, tact- 
ful method is to settle on 
specific expenses in ad- 
vance, rather than to just 
split the cost of the whole 
wedding down the mid- 
dle. For instance, the 
groom's family might 
agree to cover the flowers, 
the music, and the liquor. 
They would then discuss 
the general budget for 
these items with the cou- 
ple and have the bills sent 
directly to themselves. 
This eliminates the need 
for money changing 
hands or for further talk- 
ing about costs between 
families. 






SUNDAY, JANUARY 12th 



PLAN YOUR WHOLE WEDDING IN ONE DAY! 

DOORS OPEN AT NOON FASHION SHOW 3 PM 
COME EARLY! RESERVED SEATING 
GRAND PRIZE DRAWING FOR A TRIP 

4:15 P.M. 

See Exhibits From 

Top Hat Celebrations, Kristine's Bridal, Gingiss Formalwear, 
Total Image Studio, Cass Photography, Studio 21 Hair/Nail 
Pizazz, Steelmon Furniture, Balloons 2 U, Regency Inn, 
American Speedy Printing, Bernhardfs Bakery, Lewis 
Florist, Pampered Chef, North Star Travel, JJL Construction, 
Country Squire Banquets, Taylor Rental, Trans Air Travel, 
KE Video, Nice n' Clean Laundromat & Dry Cleaners, and 
More. 

COUNTRY SQUIRE 

For more banquet hall 

. - .. Rts. 120 & 45 

information, Grayslake. IL 

call 680-7956 







Spotcleaning tips 
for wedding dress 

It's every bride's nightmare: You're 
wearing your dream wedding dress and 

someone accidentally splashes you 
With salad dressing or douses you with 
twine. 

In order to make sure a wedding 

spill doesn't ruin the big day follow 

these specific tips. 

Act fast to keep a stain from setting. 

Don't rub the spill or expose it to 
^extreme heat, instead, a few quick blots 

,ivill take care of the worst of the 
^problem. 

Fight wear soluble stains with water. 

Perspiration, champagne, wine and 
pother beverages are common water- 
-soluble spills. Their cure: Put a towel 
funder the fabric and blot top with a 
wtlamp cloth, preferably wrung out In a 

light solution of white vinegar or 

detergent and water. Don't rub, because 
pt can break fibers. 

As soon as the stain Is gone, blot dry 
Bo prevent a ring. 

An extra hint for wine stains: Put 
llaamp salt on the spot. Let the salt dry, 
brush it away. 

Use cleaning solvents on greasy 
isstains. Lipstick and other cosmetics, 
gpcrfume, salad dressing, chocolate, 
|§tnd various foods respond well to dry 
^cleaning solvents or spray-on spot 
^removers. 

in a fix, a bit of halrspray may work 
J|as well. 

To get out a greasy stain, place It face 
pdown on paper towels and go over the 
aback with solvent and a clean cloth, 
Kworking quickly from center to edges. 
STo complete the job, use some soap 
gand water. Then blot dry. 

Treat delicate fabrics extra carefully. 
^Taffeta, for example, can wrinkle 
[permanently or oven split. Be sure to 
ceep taffeta flat and smooth when 
[removing stains, and tap or lightly 
[brush it. 

Silk can be cleaned easily with mil 
[acids or alkalies, water with a few drops 
of ammonia or vinegar. 



2liilLi"J 



tcuasie/ 



COUNTRY CLUB 



Margie's 
Bridal 



and 



tjrv&^LxvnAjriGLAJfc/ 



Q gingiss 
I formalwear 



present 



A Super Bowl Of Bridal Fashions 

Kick Super Bowl Sunday Off At Midlane Country Club In Wadsworth 



Booth Presentations: Noon-2:00 
Bridal Fashion Show: 2:15-3:00 



F<ishions By: 

Gingiss Formalwear of 
Waukegan, Margie's Bridal. 
Also this year, Engagement 
Fashions, Casual Dating 
Wear, Honeymoon Cruise & 
Swimwear and Eveningwear. 



The Best of Bridal Fair Exhibits 
From The North Shore Including: 

Travel, D.J. /Entertainment 
Services, Florists, 
Videographers, Bakeries, 
Photographers, and much 
more. 



Enjoy hors d'oeuvres and a complimentary 
glass of ivine/beer at the bar 

Come Early, Seating Is Limited 

Exhibitor Booth Space Still Available 
Call 360-0550 for more information 



"5.00 Admission 



Door Prizes 



-■:;; iijj^-iil 



January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 13B 



• 




T.tikclmul 



Bridal Extravaganza 




Traditional toasting tips for wedding guests 



No wedding party Is 
ever complete without 
the traditional toast to the 
bride and groom. 
Unfortunately, many of us 
arc not the best public 
speakers. If hundreds of 
eyes should fall upon you 
for words of wisdom and 
congratulations, don't 
"uuummm..., aaahhh...," 
and "well...," your way 
through the special 
moment. 

Champagne toasts are 
cherished highlights and 



definitely merit special 
thought. According to the 
experts, a toast is the 
perfect opportunity to 
express thoughtful 
sentiments that all too 
often go unsaid. With the 
following tips your 
message will come 
through loud and clear: 

•Think about what 
makes the bride and 
groom so special as 
individuals and as a 
couple; 

•If you could make one 



wish of happiness for the 
couple, what would it be? 

•Speak to other friends 
and relatives of the 
couple, get their input; 

•Think about what the 
main message of your 
toast-should be (love, 
commitment, 
relationships, etc.); 

•Keep your message 
brief. It should not take 
an hour to express your 



sentiments, one to three 
minutes should be 
sufficient; 

•Touch on a specific 
experience you have 
shared with the couple; 

•Practice reciting the 
toast several times before 
the big day. 

If you heed these few 
simple tips, toasting the 
ncwlywcds should be a 
joyful and memorable 
experience for all of the 



guests. Remember, too, 
that a toast should always 
end on an optimistic 



note, everyone should be 

able to look to the future 

with love In their hearts. 



Unique gifts ideas 



Following is a list of 
unique gift ideas for the 
bride and groom: 

•Hot air balloon ride 
•House cleaning 
service for a month 
•Tickets to the theatre 
•A photo album filled 



with pictures you took at 
their wedding 

•A helicopter ride 

•Memberships to a 
local health club 

•Tennis lessons for two 

•A camera for 
honeymoon pictures 



K 



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^PLACE 

Features Southeastern Wisconsin' s finest 
selection of Peignoirs, Teddies, Gowns, Robes, 
Bustiers, Specialty Underwear & Much More 
To Complete Your Bridal Trousseau. 

Free Gift Wrapping, Layaway, 
Bridal Registry. 



7624 Pershing Blvd. 

Kenosha 

414-694-1771 



^PLACE 



507 Broad St. , 
Lake Geneva / 
4 14-248- U§4^ 




•*fc 



m 



JB 



HONG CHOW 
RESTAURANT 



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• CARRY OUT SERVICE - PRIVATE PARKING 



BANQUET FACILITY 

Up to 300 

American or Chinese Dinner 
Family Style Dinner (2 meats) and 4 Hr. Open Bar 



¥ 



$■ 



per person 



ROBERTS ROAD 

'/» BLOCK SOUTH OF 176 

ISLAND LAKE 



CLOSED MON. OPEN AT 4 P.M. 

(708)526-2240 



. ; 




ss 



formalwear 



40% OFF 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 
WHEN YOU REGISTER 
YOUR WEDDING TUXEDOS 



WE'RE UNVEILING THE LATEST 
WEDDING FASHIONS. 

From Christian Dior. Raffinati, and Gingiss Custom Collection 

^H EBB ^Bflf cm nn §■■ ^m ohi ^m bs c^-^ e.£.| |^g m HH BBS ^B1IZIl~j ejb mi |^h ^m ^b — m dm ^m mbi bm 

Register Your '92 Wedding At The Wedding I 

Show At The Country Squire January 13th and j 

Get 10% Off Entire Wedding Party. I 

gingiSS offers: 

• 40% OFF on your wedding invitations 

• On the spot alterations if necessary 

• Out of town guest service (Over 200 stores) 

• The groom's rental is FREE with five rentals 

• Thursday pick up for Saturday weddings 

• All tuxedos are kept in stock 

• All tuxedos are reasonably priced 

• Ring Bearer discount 

liss* formal wear ce 

World's largest formalwear renter 




Pershing Plaza 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 

(414) 694-6077 



2201 Grand Ave. 
Waukegan 

(708) 662-0404 



.■•'._■■; . , , al ,_ — ^ 



January 3, 1992 






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Bridal Extravaganza 




iCreate a unique, trend- setting wedding 



If you are a bride-to- 
be, the way you plan your 
wedding may affect future 
traditions for centuries to 
come. The reason? Wed- 
dings are being rein- 
vented and redefined 
now. While some engaged 
couples enjoy consulting 
books of etiquette either 
for fun or to follow to the 
letter, many insist on cre- 
ating a unique wedding 
that expresses what's spe- 
cial about their union. 

One of the most com- 
mon innovations is alter- 
ing or rewriting the wed- 
ding vows. Some modern 



women think the part that 
goes "love, honor and 
obey" sounds more like a 
doggie training school 
oath than a wedding cer- 
emony. Others object to "I 
now pronounce you man 
and wife" instead of 
"husband and wife" or 
"wife and husband." in 
the 20th century, a bride 
should no more have to 
choke out something ob- 
jectionable than she 
should have to marry 
someone not of her 
choosing. 

On the other hand, the 
old-fashioned vows do 
have some charming at- 



[Sterling bridal 
[gifts are blooming 



tributes. For example, 
nothing is more intimate 
than the outmoded use of 
the second person singu- 
lar, as in "with this ring, I 
thee wed." These days, 
'thee' is strictly reserved 
for God and one's be- 
trothed. 

Not every woman 
looks good In white and 
therefore some choose an 
off-white or light pink or 
an even less traditional 
color for their gowns. After 
all, the object is to be 
beautiful. One bride who 
had lovely legs comes to 
mind. Another reason for 
taking up the hem Is that 
floor-length gowns were 
designed for graceful 



dances such as the waltz. 
Few people waltz nowa- 
days and those massive 
skirts look awkward Jig- 
gling about to modern 
music. 

Even the food and . 
drink served at receptions 
are undergoing scrutiny. 
Some couples, who have 
observed one too many 
scenes made by drunken 
relatives at other peoples' 
weddings, eliminate the 
possibility by not serving 
alcohol? And, the thought 
of guests driving home 
drunk is an added worry 
the already nervous cou- 
ple doesn't need. 

Chocoholics see no 
reason to deprive them- 



selves on this of all days 
by serving white wedding 
cake. Make it a la mode 
with double fudge ice 
cream and your guest may 
urge ycu to do the whole 
thing over again same 
time next year. 

Since today people 
often meet their spouses 
in the workplace, they fre- 
quently share professional 
interest Some choose to 
make their mutual voca- 
tion part of the cere- 
monies. Two creative 
personalities may design 
all the decorations them- 
selves. One equestrian 
couple exchanged vows 
and 'walked down the 
aisle 1 on horseback! 



When divorced or 
widowed couples wed, 
including their children 
in the ceremony is often a 
positive start In estab- 
lishing good 'step' rela- 
tionships. What roles the 
children will assume Is a 
wide open field waiting to 
be sown with the seed of 
tradition. Your new idea 
today may become the 
norm for second wed- 
dings in a 100 years. 

However you plan your 
wedding, this time in 
history allows you to be 
the director with full cre- 
ative freedom. And it can't 
get bad reviews. The only 
requirement is that the 
players enjoy themselves. 






The arrival of the 
nineties has ushered In a 
re-discovery of nature and 
all of its benefits. Experts 
report that gardening is 
the number one hobby in 
America. 

This "back-to-nature" 
trend Is having a major 
design impact on 
everything from home 
furnishings and tableware 
to fashion, jewelry and 
gifts. Literal and 
imaginative motifs of a 
radiant sun, friendly 
insects, climbing vines, 
leaves and flowers of every 
variety, bunches of fruits, 
and miniscule replicas of 
garden tools are in 
abundance. 

Quaint garden 
weddings, bouquets of 
fragrant old-fashioned 
flowers and heirloom 
silver gifts for the bridal 
couple and their wedding 
party have been long-held 
traditions that arc once 
again being embraced. 
Sterling gifts for the bride 
and her attendants are 
taking then* cue this year 



from down the garden 
path. 

Some original and 
charming "natural" 
sterling gift ideas include: 

•bold, y«i? feminine, 
satin-finished or brightly 
enamelled silver flower 
earrings, or dainty leaf 
and flower drops with 
dangling silver beads, 
pearls or pastel colored 
stones. 

•a silver butterfly, 
flower or leaf pendant to 
accentuate a scoop, 
sweetheart or "V" 
neckline. 

•a heart-shaped 
picture frame or bud vase 
entwined with silver twigs 
or vines, or in nature's 
own rough-hewn textures. 

•a key ring with a 
dangling miniature 
garden tool, flower, fruit 
or insect charm. 

•a charming bumble 
bee, sun or favorite brooch 
to embellish a jacket lapel 
or dress shoulder. 

•a choker and bracelet 
of encircled flowers or 
leaves. 



Joanie's Place 
DESIGNER CLOTHING OUTLET' 



Winter Sale m 

BELOW RETAIL 



Designer sportswear and dresses 
Accessories, jewelry and handbags 
Childrens and infants wear [x/ 

Joanie's Place 

320 E. HAWLEY ST., MUNDELEIN, IL 



& 



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566-2090 



% 



HOURS: 



For Your Convenience 



Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. -| S t Sun. of Each Month 11-4 



Closed Sundays 



IstTnurs. of Each Month 10-7 



THE LAST WORD IN SAVINGS 



P|S 



jf\ 



\0 4 Make Those Special Memories Last 

Lifetime With 




Record Your 
Valuables 

•School 
Functions 

•Acting & 

Singing 

Performances 

•Parades 

•Real 
Estate 

We transfer 

'photos, slides & 

movies to video 

S VHS/ VHS/ 

Inserting & 

Editing 



When The Going Gets 

Tough, the Tough Get 

Advertising. 



VIDEOS BY 

T.E.D. 

(708) 587-4089 

For Appointment 



Whether business is good or slow, 
you have to get your share of 
whatever business is around. 
Cutting back your advertising puts 
you at a disadvantage the very 
moment you need an edge. 
Increasing your advertising gives 
you the edge. 

In times of uncertainty, 
consumers are careful and a little 
reluctant to spend. They want 
information. One of the main 
ways they get information about 
products, services, prices and 
values is from advertising. Yours 
or somebody else*s. 



Here's a hard fact to chew on. Over 
any given period, a company that 
advertises below the industry 
average has sales that are below the 
industry average. 

Advertising is news — about 
products and services. Most 
consumers look for this kind of news 
in the pages of their community 
newspaper. In plush times, retailers 
often experiment with other media. 
But when the going gets tough, they 
concentrate their efforts in the 
community newspaper because it 
provides immediate payoff at the 
cash register. 






• Antloch News-Reporter • Fox Lake Press • Grayslake Times 
• Great Lakes Bulletin • Gurnee Press • Lake Villa Record 

• Lake Zurich Enterprise • Uberryvllle News • Llndenhurst News 
Mundeieln News • North Chicago Tribune • Round Lake News 

• Vernon Crier • Warren-Newport Press * Wauconda Leader 

Your-on-the-job community newspapers 

Contact Lakeland 

Newspapers 

30 South Whitney Street 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 333-8161 



d» 



January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 1SB 



3.1992 




9 












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^Vi We re experts at 

personalizing flowers to 
individual tastes and 
budgets. Whether you're 
having an intimate 
ceremony or lavish affair, k 
we can accommodate your \ 
needs. When it comes to \^ 
your wedding f lowers, we '11 v 
do everything But toss the , > 
bouquet. \ 

h 

Sitfc^ or ^Fresft ^towers N 

S 



Laura's Flower Shoppe 

102 S. MILWAUKEE (RT. 83) 
LAKE VILLA, IL 60046 

356-1150 



; Master Card 



VISA 




Meadows 21 



%gmantic beddings for 10 - ZSOgutsts 

Our 4 -Star Chef, $(pfp/i tBriesing has put together 

several sumptuous 6ut moderately priced 

gourmet menus for your choosing. 

2)e6arufr Winn, our <Director of Catering, will he 

happy to serve as your personal wedding 

consultant. *We can arrange your entire 

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FRIDAY 



Baha'is sponsor discussion 

The Baha'is of Lake County will sponsor an In- 
formal discussion on race unity on Friday, Jan. 3, at 
8 p.m. In Grayslake. The public is invited to parti- 
cipate In this discussion based on the statement, 
"The Vision of Race Unityf America's Most Chal- 
lenging Issue." For more information and direc- 
tions to the meeting, call (708)223-1382. 

Square Dance Club meets 

Buoys and Belles Square Dance Gub will hold a 

"Hello 1992" dance with Bob Wilson calling 

ares and Al and Ruth Hallgren cueing rounds, from 

to 11 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 3, at the First United Metho- 

fft Church, 128 N. Utica St., Waukegan. A Round Dance 

Workshop will be held from 8 to 8:30 p.m. and a Plus Tip 

be given at 1 1 p.m. 

n' B Square Dance Club meets 

The public is invited to join the McHcnry Bachelors 'n' 
Jfchelorettes Square Dance Club on Friday, Jan. 3 for a 
fi square dance to be held at the Johnsburg Community 
'■■'/. Club, 2315 W. Church St., Johnsburg. Round dancing be- 
';'- ■gins at 8 p.m. with cuers Tim and Sue Llppold; square 
A dancing, with Don Smith calling the dances, will be from 
{■ 8:30 to 11 p.m. For more information, call (815)344-2747 
fj 61(708)362-0130, 



SUNDAY 



Auditions for 'West Side Story 1 

Eruditions for Waukegan Community Players production 
West Side Sto^" will be Sunday, Jan. 5 from 1:30 to 5 

§i. and Monday, Jan. 6, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in Rosen- 
Id Cottage in Bowcn Park, North Sheridan Rd., Wauke- 
. Show dates arc March 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, and 15. For infor- 
tion call (708)662-0181. 



MONDAY 



Adler chamber music registration 

Registrations for chamber music classes, to begin the 
week of Jan. 13, are being accepted at the David Adler 
Cultural Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave., Libertyville. 
Individual placement appointments will be scheduled the 
week of Jan. 6. Openings exist at all levels for strings, 
piano, harpsichord and flute. For further information, call 
the David Adler Cultural Center at (708)367-0707. 



WliI>NIiSDAY 



LWV sponsors discussion 

The League of Women Voters (LWV) of Lake County is 
sponsoring the panel discussion, "Options for Healthcare 
Reform, " a discussion on the delivery and financing of 
health care in the United States. This free discussion, Exchange Clllb 
which is open to the public, is scheduled to take place at 
Deerfield High School, located at 1959 Waukegan Rd., 
Deerfield, from 7:15 to 10 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 8. For 
more Information, contact Karen Cronin at (708)945-1694. 



munity Room of the State Bank of Antioch in Lindenhurst 
There will be a pizza party and 'white elephant exchange' 
following the meeting. All newcomers to the Lake County 
area are welcome to attend. For more information, call 
(708)356-1852 or (708)356-5124. 

Astronomical Society to meet 

The public is invited to attend the next meeting of the 
Lake County Astronomical Society from 7 to 9 p.m. on 
Wednesday, Jan. 8 at the Warren-Newport Library in Gur- 
nee. The meeting will feature a demonstration on how to 
determine latitude and longitude using household items. 
For more information, contact Publicity Director, Gary 
Smith, at (708)362-0168 or (708)688-2465. 



THURSDAY 




Newcomers Club holds meeting 

The Lakeland Newcomers Club will hold its next general 
meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the Com- 



The Exchange Club of Grayslake meets every Thursday 
at noon at Randell's Restaurant in Grayslake. Visitors and 
prospective members are invited to join the club for lunch 
and learn more about the Exchange. For more information 
and reservations contact Bob Wegge (708)223-0777, 
Monlka O'Connor (708)223-5547 or JoAnn Ritzwolier at 
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i •. i. 1 1 j . 



Lakeland Newspapers 17 

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(708) 223-8161 



OBITUARIES 



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Louis A. Dahlem 

Age 90 of Round Lake, IL, passed away December 
27, 1991 ai the St. Thcrcsc Medical Center in 
Waukegan. He was bom November 22, 1901 in Si. 
Louis, MO to Adolph and Emma Dahlem. He moved to 
Racine, WI in 1917 and lived there until 1966, when he 
moved to Phoenix AZ, for 10 years. In 1976 he moved 
to die Round Lake area to be closer to his 2 sons and 
their families. He was a member since 1976 of the Lake 
Villa Methodist Church. Prior to that he belonged to the 
Christ United Methodist Church in Racine, WI for 45 
years. 

He was married for 71 years to Lina (nee) DeVrics on 
April 9, 1920 in Waukegan. He is survived by his 
beloved wife Lina; 2 sons, Donald (Shirley) Dahlem of 
Arlington Heights; Richard (Ariannc) Dahlem of 
Kildecr; 9 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren. He 
is also survived by a brother, Waller (Ann) Dahlem of 
Overland, MO; and many nieces and nephews. 

He was precccdcd in death by his parents, Adolph 
and Emma Dahlem and one sister, Helen Dahlem. 

Visitation and services were held Monday, December 
30, 1991 at the Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 222 
North Roscdalc Court (Roscdalc Ct. al Cedar Lake 
Rd.). Interment look place at ihc Westlawn Memorial 
Park Cemetery. 

Henry Scudder 

Age 86, died December 20, 1991 in Dallas, Texas. He 
was born September 20, 1905 in Hopkins County, TX. 
He was in sales and was a resident of Dallas, TX. He is 
survived by his wife, Eva Scudder of Dallas; daughters, 
Zcta Hollingsworth of Dallas, TX; Glenda Cartwright 
of Lindcnhurst, IL; grandchildren Kalhy Hollingsworth 
and Pam Mcrryman, both of Dallas, TX; Keith 
Cartwrighl of Berkley, CA; Kelly Cartwright of 
Lindcnhurst, IL; sisters Mrs. Alma Mooncy, Eva 
Miltner, Thclma Pcitigrew, and Mildred Brock, all of 
Dallas, TX; three nieces and seven nephews. Services 
were held 4:00 P.M. Monday, December 23, 1991 al 
Restland Memorial Chapel in Dallas, TX. Rev. Charles 
McLaughlin, Rev. Lee Hunt and Dr. W.A. Criswell 
officiated. Interment was at Rustland Memorial Park, 
Dallas, TX. 

William Victor Walter Michelini 

Age 62. of Fox Lake, died December 19, 1991. He is 
survived by Patricia Michelini; sons William and Victor 
Michelini; daughters Susan, Rita, Leon a, Barbara, 
Michelle, Victoria, Floy and Shirley Michelini. He was 
the brother of Shirley Crisconc; the beloved son of 
Lcona Michelini; and grandfather of Candicc, Megan 
and Lindscy Jaeger; John and Chuntcll Gcbert; Jessica 
and William Allen; and Morgan Bccchcr, A private 
memorial service was held at St. Bcde's Church in 
lnglcside at 10:00 a.m. Saturday, December 28. 



John P. Jestice, Sr. 

Age 81, a resident of Fox Lake for over 25 years 
formerly of Chicago, died Saturday, December 28, 
1991 in his home. 

He was bom on July 8, 1910 in Melrose Park. A U.S. 
Army veteran of WWII, he was employed as a bus 
mechanic and material handler for the C.T.A. for over 
38 years before his retirement. He is survived by his 
wife, Helen Louise Jcsticc (nee) Johnson of Fox Lake; 
a son, John P. Jcsticc, Jr., or Chicago; a daughter Joan 
Jcsticc of Oak Lawn; 2 brothers, Roger (Amelia) 
Jcslicc of Florida and Peter Jestice; and a sister, 
Veronica Wilchcr of Chicago. He was precccdcd in 
death by 2 sisters, Mary and Josephine. Private services 
were arranged by by the K.K. Hamshcr Funeral Home, 
12 N. Pisiakcc Lake Rd., Fox Lake (The Chapel On 
The Lake). <*0n,i0~*&v^*&~>.&*&\ 

Kenneth Hamm 

Age 64, a lifetime resident of Fox Lake, died Friday, 
December 27, 1991 in Lake Forest Hospital. He was 
bom in Bcardstown, IL on November 10, 1927. He was 
a carpenter by trade and had been a longtime member 
of ihc Carpenters Union #250 out of Waukegan. 
Survivors include 6 sons: James of Pennsylvania; Frank 
and Robert of California; Fred and Dave Hamm of Fox 
Lake; 2 daughters: Helen of California and Theresa of 
Gurncc. He is also survived by 3 grandchildren; a 
brother Frank (Jean) Hamm of Fox Lake; 2 sisters: 
Lorctta Walls of Solon Mills and Joan Hamm of Fox 
Lake. He was proceeded in death by a son, Harold, and 
by a brother, Harold. Private services were arranged by 
K.K. Hamshcr Funeral Home, 12 N. Pistakcc Lake 
Road, Fox Lake, IL (The Chapel On The Lake). 

Philip B. Hippchen 

Age 76 of Fox Lake, IL, presently residing in Park 
Ridge, IL, died December 21 , 1991 at Lutheran General 
Hospital, Park Ridge. He was bom January 18, 1915 in 
Chicago to the late Adam and Caroline (Karls) 
Hippchen. He was also formerly of McHcnry from 
1956 to 1970. He was an Underwriter for many years al 
Bankers Life and Casualty. He was a member of St. 
John The Baptist Catholic Church and the McHcnry 
Moose Lodge Post 691. He was also a member of The 
Doer's Club, an association of the Fox Lake State Bank. 
He is survived by 2 sons: Fred Hippchen of St. Paul, 
MN; and Steven Hippchen of McHcnry; one brother: 
Frederick A. Hippchen of Chicago; and one ncice: 
Carol Hocflcr-Donnclly of Chicago. He was the Great 
Uncle of 8. He was precccdcd in death by his wife, 
Beatrice, on May 20, 1964. No visitation was held. A 
Memorial Mass will be al 12:00 noon on Friday 
January 3, 1992 at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. 
Father Holdrcn will officiate. In lieu of flowers, 
memorials may be made to St. John's Church. 



Eugene D. Foerster 

Age 73, formerly of Round Lake, died December 26, 
1991 at Holmes Regional Medical Center, Melbourne, 
Florida. He was a resident of Palm Bay, Florida. Bom 
February 19, 1918 in Milwaukee, WI, he was married 
to Lcanna Foerster December 17, 1966 and also was a 
U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War. He worked as 
Cemetery Sales Counselor & Administrator in both 
Illinois and Wisconsin. Since 1984, he was the Funeral 
Directors Assistant at Souih Brevard and Palm Bay 
Funeral Home, and a member of Peace Lutheran 
Church, Palm Bay, FL. While in Racine, WI, he worked 
al Wesllawn Cemetery and attended Redeemer 
Lutheran Church. While in Round Lake, he worked at 
Highland Memorial, Mundclein Memorials and 
attended Trinity Lutheran Church. He was also a former 
resident of Applclon, WI. 

He is survived by his wife, Leanna Wachs Foerster of 
Palm Bay, FL; a sister, Delma Tillirson of Palm Bay, 
FL; step sons; Bruce Wachs of Bradenton, FL; Wayne 
Wachs of Racine, WI; step daughter Susan Wachs of 
Racine, WI; a step sister and step brother; and six 
grandchildren. Visitation was al Peace Lutheran 
Church, Palm Bay, FL December 29, 1991. Interment 
was at Florida National Cemetery, Bushncll, FL. 
Donations may be made lo Peace Lutheran Church, 
1801 Port Malabar Boulevard, NE, Palm Bay, FL 
32905. 

Mabel E. Nelson 

Age 88, of Richmond died Sunday, December 29, 
1991 at Northern Illinois Medical Center in McHcnry. 
She was bom June 22, 1903 in Richmond, die daughter 
of Anton and Etta McKinlcy Krumpcn. She was a 
graduate of McHcnry High School and worked as an 
inspector for Woodstock Die Casting in Woodstock for 
18 years, reiiring in 1966. She was a member of the 
United Auio Workers, Local #922 in Woodstock. 

She is survived by a daughter Belly Popelka of Spring 
Grove; two sons, Dick (Eileen) Nelson of Port Arthur, 
TX and Bill (Margaret) Nelson of Richmond; 28 
grandchildren; 36 great-grandchildren and one great- 
great-grandson; a sister. Ruth Stewart of Walworth, WI. 
She was proceeded in death by a daughter, Ruth Ann 
Dcwart; u son, Ted; six sisters, Carrie Hoos, Mary 
Stewarl, Luella Krumpen, Ethel Krumpcn, Maude 
Krumpcn, Grace Aingcr and an infant brother. 

Funeral services will be at 1:00 p.m. Friday, January 
3, 1992 at the Ehorn-Adams Funeral Home in 
Richmond with Rev. Glenn Mensing officiating. 
Interment will be in Richmond Cemetery. Visitation 
will be from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday at the Ehorn-Adams 
Funeral Home in Richmond. Memorials may be made 
in her name lo the Richmond Rescue Squad. 



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Death Notices 

BOHDANOWICZ 

Veronica "Vera" 
Bohdanowicz, 83 of 
Kenosha, Wisconsin. 
Arr: Piasccki Funeral 
Home, Kenosha. 
BROWN 

Nellie Jean Brown, 
52, or North Chicago. 
Arr: Bradshaw and 
Range Funeral Home, 
Waukegan and Zion. 
BUTLER 

Harriet V. Butler, 96 
of Libcrtyvillc. Arr: The 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libcrtyvillc. 
CAMPBELL 

Marguerite A. Camp- 
bell, 74 of Gurncc. Arr: 
The Burnett-Dane Fu- 
neral Home, Liberty- 
ville. 
CAYA 

Helen E. Caya nee 
Johnson, 75 of Brandon, 
Florida, formerly of Fox 
Lake and Waukegan. 
Arr: The Gurncc 
Funeral Home, Gurncc. 
HUFFENDICK 

Myrtle Huffcndick, 
89 of Sania Anna, Cali- 
fornia, formerly of 
Antioch. Arr: private. 
KOWITZ 

Ronald W. Kowitz, 
42, of Libcrtyvillc. Arr: 
The Burnett-Dane 
Funeral Home, 

Libcrtyvillc. 
LAVALLEE 

Robert F. Lavallcc, 64 
of Spring Grove. Arr: 
The Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch. 
MADELUNG 

Charles O. Madclung, 
76, Arr: Ahlgrim & 
Sons Funeral Home, 
Lake Zurich. 
MEYERS 

Gladys M. Meyers, 
84, of Island Lake. Arr: 
Wauconda Funeral 
Home, Wauconda. 




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Death Notices 
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on 
Tuesday. 




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January 3, 1992 



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Lakeland Newspapers 



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Death Notices 

(INARIK 

Rose V. Minarik, nee 
/okac, 88 of Ingleside. 
Lrr: K.K. Hamshcr 
Mineral Home, Fox 
.ake. 

ATTERSON 

Ernest Edward Patter- 
son, 85 of North 
hicago. Arr: Bradshaw 
Range Funeral 
omes, Waukcgan and 
ion. 

'ETERSEN 

Rosemary Petersen, 
•1 of Antioch. Arr: 
itrang Funeral Home, 

Uioch. 

»ETRAUSKAS 

Vladas W, Petrauskas, 
S9 of North Chicago. 
Lrr: The Pctroshius 
: uneral Home. 

►UINLAN 

John D. Quinlan, 72 
}f Bristol, WI. Arr: The 
Strang Funeral Home, . 

itioch. 

Jrehm 

Florence Rose Rehm, 
Triee Rouzan, 70, of 
;;3Libertyville. Arr: The 
; : Burnett-Dane Funeral 
>: Home, Liberlyville. 

SCHEEL 

* E. Weincr Scheel, 64 
of Lake Villa. Arr: The 
Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. 






SCHULTZ 

Charlotte J. Schultz, 
^68 of Kenosha, Wis- 
consin. Arr: The 

^Congdon Funeral 

[Home, Zion. 

[STABLES 

Helen M. Stables, 71 
of Saline, Michigan, 
formerly of Round 
Lake. Arr: Robinson- 
jBahm Miller Funeral 
jHome, Saline, Mich- 
igan. 

[TAYLOR 

Norman A. Taylor, 76, 
[of Grayslakc. Arr: The 
[Strang Funeral Home, 
[Antioch, IL. 

ITHOMASON 

Louis Thomason, 60, 
Jof Fox Lake. Arr: K.K. 
{Hamshcr Funeral Home, 
'ox Lake. 

/ANDERMEER 

Greta Vandcrmecr, 42 

[of Chicago. Arr: 

[Ahlgrim & Sons 

? uncral Home, Lake 

[Zurich. 

[WESTPHAL 

Ralph J. Wcslphal, 77 

[of Round Lake. Arr: 

The Juslen's Round 

Lake Funeral Home, 

Round Lake. 

IWITKOWSKI 

Henry A. Witkowski, 
(76 of Lake Villa. Arr: 
Ringa Funeral Home, 
Lake Villa. 







(708)223-8161 



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1-00-15 
MICROPIGMENT- 
Implantation, permanent 
eyelining, eyebrows and 
lip color, plus electrolysis 
by Sherry. (708)244- 
1640. 

1-5-1 



VOLUNTEERS 
NEEDED 

Lakeland 

Newspapers is 

looking for readers 

and non-readers to 

join us for a Focus 

Group at our office 

in Grayslake. 

Spend about an 

hour with us and 

share your opinions 

about newspapers. 

If interested, call 

Elizabeth 

(708)223-8161 

ext.139 



rcc 




ATTENTION WE- 
are sorry, but we cannot 
accept animals in the 
Free Ads. Please contact 
the Humane Society. 
3-TF-31 



TO ED CONNELL- 

too much time and too 
many holidays have gone 
by. Please contact your 
daughter Kathy at Box 
RR, c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, PO Box 
268, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

4-1-2 

ADOPTION 

HAPPILY-Married 
couple has everything to 
offer and atl the love to 
give to a special baby 
they always dreamed of. 
We're Steve and Janice, 
responsible, caring, and 
also want the best for 
your baby. Please help 
make our dreams come 
true. Call our attorney. 
Glenna collect. 
(217)352-8037. 
4-1-67 
CHRISTMAS-GREAT 
gifts for a friend and 
yourself. Order Lakeland 
Newspapers gift 
subscription for a friend 
or neighbor that runs all 
year. Only $16.50. Use 
order blank elsewhere 
and receive a gift 
yourself, a handsome 
wooden soldier 
nutcracker. See ad or call 
(708)223-8161 for 
information. 

4-TF-150 
ADOPTION EMPTY- 
nursery awaits infant in 
loving HOME. Eager tod- 
dler, fun loving parents, 
devoted grandparents 
and a happy, secure fu- 
ture. We'll help you any 
way we can. Lou and 
Mary. (708)398-3353 
collect. 




Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



HelpWanled 
Part-Time 




ADDRESS 

ENVELOPES 

Part-Time AT HOME lor PAY. 
You Musi Type or Have Good 

Handwriting. Call 
1-800-783-8997. Ext. 138 



Cashier/Sales Assoc, 

P/T Weekends 
Lake Zurich Mobil 

(Comer of Rand & Eta Rd.) 

Competitive pay plus 

benelhs 

E/E/C7 Apply In Person 



Village Campus 
Counselor 

Antioch Parks & 
Recreation is looking for a 
counselor for our Before 
and Alter School Program. 

The hours are 2:30-6 
p.m. Mon.-Fri. Additional 
hours on school institute 
days and holidays. 
Experience or education in 
chlldcare preferred. For 
more information call Carol, 

708-195-2160 



SM0WPL0W 

OWNER/ 
OPERATORS 

Northbrook/ 
Buffalo Grove 

Area 
Top Pay & Gas 

Lots of Work 
(708) 272-1886 



STUDENTS 

Here's a groat opportunity (or college and mature high school stu 
donis — loarn the exciting field ol 

TELEMARKETING 

If you enjoy talking on Iho phono, hero's an excellent way to 
sharpen your people skills and make money. We oiler.. 

•Pleasant Working Condilions 
-Flexible Part-Time Evening Hours 

Please apply in person. 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 
30 S. Whitney 
Grayslako, IL 

(708) 223-8161 • (800) 442-8161 




January 3, 1992 



I 



mmLOYmmT 







HelpWanled 
Parl-Tlme 




HelpWaniec 
Parl-Time 



m 






Front Desk 
Receptionist 

P/T Afternoons 

Qualifications: 

Lite typing and a 

smiling face. Call Karen 

(708) 662-1920 

(Gurnee) 



1 



JAKES PIZZA 

Now Hiring 

• Pizza Makers 

• Counter Help 

• Delivery Persons 

(Next to Jewel, Lake Zurich) 

(708) 72«H>90Q 

(Leave Message) 



ANCHOR 
BANK 

is looking for an indi 
vidua! with 1 or 2 years 
experience with 

Word Processing 
and Lotus 

This part-time position 

consists of 8 to 9 hours 

a week. Hours would be 

flexible— could consist 

of 2 hours for 4 days 

weekly or 4 hours for 2 

days, etc. 

Contact 

Marcia Fox 
(708) 548-3000 

Men., Tiies., Thurs., Fri.,9 a.m 
I to 4 p.m or Sal. 9 am. to I p.m. | 



HelpWanled 
Full-Time 

CABLE TV IN- 
STALLERS. Immediate 
openings. Will train, re- 
quires pickup/van. Weekly 
pay, health insurance, 
paid vacation and much 
morel Preferred Cable 
1(800)397-7389 or 
(515)984-6803. EOE. 
20-00-4 



HelpWanled 

Full-Time 




BOOKKEEPER 

Full Charge 

Full or part-time 
with National Trade 
Association In Vernon 
Hills . Present 
bookkeeper retiring 
after 10 years. 
Excellent benefit 
program. Small 
congenial office. 

Call Mrs. He Williams 

(708) 680-3500 

lor appointment 



*POSTALJOBS* 

Antioch Area 

$23,700 per year plus 

benefits. Postal carriers. 

sorters, clerks. For an 

application and exam 

information, call 

1-219-736-9807, 

Ext. P9509 

8 am-8 pm, 7 days 



ASSISTANT 

MANAGER 

TRAINEE 

Unique career 

opportunity, no 

experience 

necessary 

(708) 623-0020 



CLASSIFIED GUIDE 



Ukuk 



County] 



« Sfiver Lafct 



•Bffrof 



Richmond 



.♦SPA* 

Grow 



Johnsburg 



•Ute ^Jnctonhunt 



•Fox Late 

w 



•Kenosha 



•llfflburn 



•Round 



Gnyifcfct 



•Zlon 

(«)*W8dfworth 
.Gum* Wftukegin 



•Ptrtt 



McHenry 



Crystal 
Lake I 

McHenry I 
County. 



mWM take County N^ •JS™ 



•WaucorxJa 



tturcjafcin 



Oaks 



fwrteflfcm .UteZafehCi) 



HIIH 



.SCBdwr •Unw*nihlr» ..'.. ... lBke Fores ' 



Birring ton 



Grow 



MMHJIVCEMEYIS 

Notices ' 1 

Lost & Found 2 

Free 3 

Personals 4 

Auctions 5 

Business Personals 6 

Financial 7 

EMPLOYMEiYT 

He|p Wanted Part-Time 
Halp Warned Full-Tima 
Employment Agencies 
Business Opportunities 
Work Wanted 
Child Care 
School/Instruction 



19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

MARKET GUIDE 

Antiques 30 

Appliances 31 

Bartefflrade 32 

Bazaars/Cralts 33 

Bunding Materials 34 

Business/Office Equipment 35 

Electronics/Computers 36 

Farm Guide 37 

Firewood 38 

Garage/Rummage Sales 40 



MARKET GUIDE 

Good Things to Eat 
Horses & Tack 
Household Goods/Furniture 
Lawn/Garden 
Miscellaneous 
Medical Equip/Supplies 
Musical Instruments 
Pets & Supplies 
Tools & Machinery 
Wanted To Buy 

REAL ESTATE 

Homes For Safe 

Homes For Rent 
Homes Wanted 
Homes Builders 
Condo/Town Homes 
Mobile Homes 
Apartments For Rent 
Aparlmenls Wanted 
Apt ./Homes To Share 
Rooms For Rent 
Businoss Properly For Sale 
Business Property For Rent 
Buildings 

Lots/Acreage/Farms 
Resorts/Vacation Rentals 
Out ot Area Property 



Buffalo Grove 
•Palatine •Northbrook 

Cook County 

REAL ESTATE 

41 Cemetery Lots 66 

42 Real Estate Wanled 67 

43 Real Estate Misc. 68 

Jt RECREATIONAL 

y* Recreational Vehicles 70 

45A Snowmobiles/ATVs 71 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 

51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 

62 SERITO DIRECTORY 

03 Appliance Repair S1 

g4 Blacktop S3 

65 Builders S5 




Highland Park 
■Deerfield 



Boats/Motors£tc, 


72 


Camping 


73 


Travel/Vacation 


74 


Sports Equipment 


75 


Airplanes 


76 


TKANSWRTAimV 


Cars For Sale 


80 


RentafLease 


81 


Classic/Antique Cars 


82 


Service & Parts 


83 


Car Loans/Insurance 


84 


Van 5 


85 


Trucks/Trailers 


86 


Heavy Equipment 


87 


Motorcycles 


88 


Wanled To Buy 


89 



SERVICE 




DIRECTORY 




Carpenlry 


S7 


Carpet Cleaning 


S8 


Concrete/Cemeni 


S9 


Dry Wall 


S10 


Education/Instruction 


S11 


Electrical 


S13 


Handyman 


S14 


Heating/Air Conditioning 


S15 


Landscaping 


S17 


Laundry/Cleaning 


S19 


Legal Services 


S21 


Moving/Storage 


S23 


Painting/Decorating 


S25 


ParaLegal/Typing Services 


S26 


Plumbing 


S27 


Pools 


S29 


Professional Services 


S31 


RadiofTV Repair 


S33 


Remodeling 


S35 


Resumes 


S37 


Roofing/Siding 


S39 


Storage 


S41 


Tax Service 


S43 


Trees/Plants 


S45 


Wedding 


S47 


Miscellaneous 


S49 



Lakeland's Classified Ads appear in all 14 newspapers with a 

Readership of over 200,000 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Ploa&o check your ad on the FIRST kisenbn date. In iho event ot an error or omission. we wil be responsible tor ONLY Iho FIRST Incorrect 
Insertion. The newspaper will be reepomWo tor only the portion ot the ad that It In error. P^omb notfy the Clasalied Oopanmonl In the event ot an 
enor wKhln 1 weak ot run date. CANCELLATIONS mu»l be made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before pobticalion. 

Lakeland Newspaperi reserve* the right to property claaiKy al aoVertltinfl. edl or delete any objectionable wording, or rejed any advertisement 
tor credk or policy reaeoni. 

All Help Wanted advertising is published under unified headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowtngty accept help wanted advertising that In 
any way violates the Human Rights Act. 



Hours: Monday - Thursday 

B a.m. • 8 p.m. 

Friday 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - Noon 

DEADLINE: 

Wednesdays at 10 a.m. 



(708) 223-8161 

Fax.: (708) 823*810 




MailmCaid 



Payment in advance is required 
for these ads: 

• Advertts era out at Lakeland circulation area 

• Business Opportunities • Mobile Homes 

• Situations Wanted • Debt Disclaimers 

• Garage and Moving Sates* 

•Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pets wil be considered for giveaway. 



Lakeland Newspapers 19 



I 



uarv3. 1992 




|PiHiyftwmw i r'- ; - 1 - 



BHM 



, - [ 








mmmmmmm. 




HclpWanted 
Full-Time 




MdpWuntctl 
Full-Timc 



f§ 



HelpWantedg 
Full-Time 

YOU ALWAYS HIT 
THE MARK WITH 

THE CLASSIFIEDS 



IlelpW anted— ... 
Full-Time 




HcIpWantedjg 
Full-Time 




HelpWanted 
Full-Time 




IlelpWanled 
Full-Time 




Looking for Employment? 
Personnel has moved! 




I DIRECTIONS 



Visit us at our NEW Personnel 
location and make application for 

employment at 



or at any one of our 1 1 banking centers; 



Buffalo Grove 

Deerfield 

Gumee 

Lake Forest 

Lakehurst 

Mundelein 



Mundelein facility 
North Chicago 
Waukegan * 
Waukegan facility 
Zion 



Hawthorn Business Park 
945 Lakevfew Parkway 

Suite 170 
Vernon Hills, IL 60061 j , , 

708-918-3600 ^::J=r First Midwest Bank 

'Mill National Association 

equal opportunity employer m/f 



LABORATORY 
TECHNICIAN 

The Lake County Health Department 
hat two lull 'tint a positions available In 
the Environmental Health Division 
laboratory. Requires B.S. degree In 
chemistry or microbiology. Perform wet 
chemical and microbiological analyses 
on water samples. Soma weekend 
work required. Salary commensurate 
wltr experience, from J20.W6-S30.362 
Excellent benelit package. Please 
direct resumes to: Personnel Oltlce, 
Lake County Health DopL, 3010 Grand 
/Wo.. Waukegan, IL 60065. 

Smoke If oo environment An equal 
cppoftuniry/affirmstlvo action employe*. 



Field Technician 

Air Pollution Consulting Firm 

needs Field Technicians lor air 

pollution measurement. Must 

have mechanical aptitude, in 

good physical shape, (i.e., lili 

equipmenl) and have no (ear 

of heights. Travel 50-70%. 

College math and chemistry a 

plus. Good growth potential. 

Send resume lo: 

ARI Environmental, Inc. 
951 Old Rand Rd., Unit 106 

Wauconda, IL 60084 



Full & Part Time 

RECEPTIONIST 

NEEDED 

We are seeking a 
receplionist to work lull 

and part time hours 

Monday thru Friday. Musi 

be able to handle a busy 

swiichboard with multiple 

lines, type 45 wpm and 

handle olher various olfice 

duties. 

Apply in Person 

LAKELAND 

NEWSPAPERS 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 



Banking 

Clerks 

We are seeking friendly, 
detail oriented individuals 
with excellent customer 
service skills. Requirements 
also include good verbal and 
hand written communication 
skills. Previous clerical and 
CRT background is a plus. 
Please apply in person at: 

GREfiT LAKES 

credit union 

2525 Green Bay Road 

North Chicago, IL 

60088 

equal opportunity employ or m.1 
smoke-tee environment 



No Nights, 
Weekends, 

or 
Holidays 

Work Monday- 
Friday Only 
We train, Need Car 

Merry 
Maids 

(708) 367-0800 



CIRCULATION 

A position for a circulation 

clerk is available at 

Cook Memorial Library. 

Hours Include 2 evenings 

per week and one 

weekend per month. 

Requires someone who 

is detail oriented with 

good public relation skills. 

Experience preferred. 

Contact Irene Allsop 

Circulation Coordinator 

Cook Memorial Library 

413 N.Milwaukee Ave. 

Llbertyvllle, IL 60048 

(708) 362-2330 



U niiiiiiHii Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiininiiiriiiiiiiiniiiiiuniiii yi 



84 LUMBER 

MANAGER TRAINEE 

84 Lumber Company inlands lo open 
200 stores by the year 2000, which 
has created several career opportun- 
ities. First year manager trainee 
earnings average $20,000-525,000 
All ol our promotions are from within: 
Contractor Sales 
$25,000 to $35,000 

Outside Sales 
$30,000 to $80,000 

Co-Managers 
$25,000 to $35,000 

Managers 
$40,000 to $100,000 

Benefits include hospitalization, profit 

sharing and 40 IK Plan. Future relocation 

may be necessary. See Manager. 

Saturday, January 4, 1992 

Irorn 12 noon lo 5:00 pm 

B4 Lumber Company 

798 E. Rollins Rd. 
Round Lake Beach, IL 



TELLERS 

Immediate full and part time openings for individuals 
with strong cash handling experience. We are 
looking for individuals who possess excellent 
customer service skills. Prior teller experience 
preferred. We offer a professional and friendly work 
environment as well as a competitive salary and 
benefits package. Please apply in person at: 

GREAT LAKES CREDIT IIMON 

2525 Green Bay Road • North Chicago, I L 60088 

equal opportunity employer m/l • smoke free environment 



S urn iiiiniiiuiiiinniiniimninnmmimnnininiin Milium nniimim 



Work 
Warned 




Child Care 




Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



HANDICAPPED- 

Mother needs assistants 
(Gurneo). Have rooms 
available in exchange for 
contracted hours of 
assistance. Call, 
(708)587-5558 recorder 
alter 4 rings. 



GRAYSLAKE 
FAMILY-seeks 

responsible energetic 
care giver for newborn 
and 2 year old. Live 
in/out. Call (708)548- 
1302. 

24-1-2 



Medical Opportunities in 1992 



BBS 



I EXPERIENCED 
\\ MEDIAL 

" -««MSU»KT 

William ^ me 

Age 62 623-7591 

survivor 



) 




Medical 

ULTRASC ^-HNOLOGIST 

Need ed tor I _. true pwlson. Mutt be 
ROWS teglitned of eligible. Compettlve 

*a! * bene*. Ind. Si OOO SIGN-ON 
BONUS, pd. holiday »& (elocution eotiL 

Please call 

ROGERS DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY 

CENTEfl 

(702) 385-4304 

ttochlM Vegas, NV) 



[ 



PT's/LPTA 1 ! 

Needed tor Ul & pari km potllom at a 

lepdy giowtng Vtam« Htahh Agency in 
Wtttam Nor ti Carolina. Compattn ul. 

wJgr»at bans. Sand ratuma or cal 

B. Dtnn, CLEVELAND HCM E HEALTH 

AGENCY INC., P.O. Box 2247, Shot* 

N.C. 20151-2247 (704) 487-5225 






.cat 
'PHYSICAL THERAPIST* 

Need lor FT opening, al pvt. proetico, Joe. 
in Eastern Soode Suburb WeU-equippod 

cine wfopen gym. Orthopedic 4 SpaU 

med.eipor. laq.Comp. Ed.Aienos.incI. 
pd. heal th ins. & ed. Send resume a cal 
BELLEVUESPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC 

11400 SE. 6th SL rWlwuo. YVA MOM 
(206) 455-0699 



M44J Celt 

"REGISTEHED NURSES" 

Heeded lor FT & FT po&ibons at prog. 

loal.. ki Jachion, MM. Must have eipei 

in Med/Surg. ICU a OB. New enhanced 

eat. /bene*. Send resume or coll: 

Martha Johnson, DON 

JACKSON MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 

1430 N. Highway, Jackson MN 56143 

(507) 847-2420 

E.O.E. M/F 



RIVs/LPiVs 

Full and Part time positions 

available. Flexible hours, 

excellent benefit package. 

Contact Pat Davis, D.O.N. 

(708) 746-8435 

Sheridan Health 

Care Center 
2534 Elim, Zion 



Medical 
•PHYSICAL THERAPIST* 

(SPORTS MEDICINE/ORTHOPEDIC) 
Noodod lor busy, growing outpatient 
rehab, clinic. New slate-oMhe-art 
equipment. Must be lie. or eligible. 
Comp. salary w/benofits Including 
generous SIGN-ON-BONUS. Send 
resume or coll: 

MID-SOUTH REHAB GROUP 

2235 Covington Pike 

Suite 42 

Memphis TN 3B12C 

(901)3821-7476 

E.O.E. 



Medical Office 
Positions Available 

in expanding, busy GYN 

Clinic. Looking for 

medical receptionist, 

certified medical 

assistants, and billing 

clerks. Must have related 

experience, current CPR 

and strong interpersonal 

skills. For more 
information call Amy at 

1-800-852-5678 



Long Term Health Care 

Facility in Long Grove 

has need of 

Pool Nurse 

All Shifts 

Competitive Salary & 

Benefits 

Contact Marilyn 
9:30-5 p.m. M-F 
(708)438-8275 



Earn While 
You Learn 

Applications being accepted 
for Certified Nurse Assistant 
Training Program (CNA 
positions available-all shifts) 

Apply in person 

Sheridan Health Care Ctr. 

2534 Elim Ave., Zion 

EOE 



R.P.T./L.P.T.A. 
O.T.R./C.O.T.A. 

Noodod (or lull time positions at 
various clinics throughout 
Florida Slate. Must be lie. or 
eligible. Top salaries w/cut- 
standing bens. Send resume or 
call: Vickie Cox, 

REHAB CONCEPTS, INC. 
1 134 W. Granada Blvd., 

Ormond Beach, FL 32174 
1-800-628-7868 



DENTAL 
ASSISTANT 



Busy modern dental office In 
Llndenhurst looking for a highly 
motivated and enthusiastic 
Denial Assistant, Evening hours 
& some Saturday hours will be 
required. Call 

(708) 356-0260 

Mon.-Thurs 



J 



Long Term Health Care 

Facility in Long Grove 

has need of 

Rehab Nurse 

for our day shift 

Competitive 
salary & benefits 
Contact Marilyn 
9:30-5 PM M-F 

708-438-8275 



Full or Part Time. 

All Shifts 

Call for interview 

HIGHLAND 

HOME 

Genoa City, Wl 
(414)279-3345 



UN/Clinical 
Coordinator 

Exciting position available 
in busy GYN hospital- 
based oul patient clinic. 
Must have related 
experience, strong 
supervisory skills and 
ability to coordinate 
schedules of larger staff. If 
. interested promptly 
forward resume and 3 
professional references to: 
G.L. Administrator 
9549 Montgomery Rd. 
2nd Floor 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
45242 



f 



Openings left for 
Night Shift, part/full 
time and weekend 

position open for 

RN/LPN. If 
interested, contact 

Sister Mary 
D.O.N. 

Monsr 

SH JOSEPH 

(708) 438-5050 

Inactive or Retired 
Nurses Welcome 






Immediate 
openings for 

DIRECT 

CARE 

WORKERS 

HOUSEKEEPERS 
ALSO AVAILABLE 

Part-Time All Sniffs. 

Will Train. Please 

Contact 

Sister Arlene 

(708) 438-5050 

MOUNT ST. 

JOSEPHS 

Lake Zurich 

■Mi r 



DIRECT 

CflRE 

WORKERS 

New 6 bed home 

opening soon 

serving Autistic/MR 

teenagers in Park 

City, IL 

Competitive wages 

and benefits. 

Must be 21+. 

Call: 

BLARE House 

Inc. 
(708)299-2200 

EOE 



MedeaJ 

'Flexible hours* 
NURSING C.N.A.'S 

Hlllcrest Retirement 
Village is looking for a 
few more caring and 
responsible C.N.A.'s. 
All shifts available. 
'Sign on bonus. 
' Flexible hours and 
FLOAT POOL. 
•Free meals. Union. 
If you are interested in 
joining our family 
please stop by: 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

60073 

(708) 546-5301 



FOSTER CARE WORKER 

Specialized Foster Core program located in Northern Lake County has 
on opening January 2, 1992. Experience in Foster Care preferred. Master 
Degree (or BA with 5 years eirperience in Foster Care) required In Social 
Work, Psychology, or other health care field, 

OUTPATIENT THERAPIST II 

Need Therapist to work in small educational sotting in MeHonry County 
(Union) to perform clinical services Including individual, group and family 
psychotherapy. Strong team component. Supervision and training provided 
Masters Degree (Psychology/Social Work) required. 

REGISTERED NURSE 

A Residential Treatment Center seeks an RN to administer programs ol 
basic health care for emotionally disturbed/behavior disordered children, 
ages B-18. Instructor's Certification in CPR and First Aid preferred. 

Excellent salary and benefits. Please send resume to; 

ALLENDALE ASSOCIATION 

Personnel Department 

P.O. Box 1088, Lake Villa, IL 60046 

(708) 356-2351 



RN/LPN 

Private Duty 

WauKegan 

Melmedica Children's Healthcare, Inc. 

A home healthcare agency specializing in 

Pediatrics is currently seeking nurses to 

care for a delightful 11 month old infant 

with oxygen and apnea monitor. 8 hour 

day and night shifts available. 

Call Maureen Kenny, RN 
Nurse Recruiter 
(708) 335-3331 



Medical Employment 

Available 






Robert R. McCormick University Clinics 
LPN 

Needed for busy primary care/multi 

specialty clinic. Full time, flexible hours, 

1 Saturday per month, no Sundays 

or Holidays. 

Medical Records Coder 

Needed for variety of coding, ART 

certification required, 40 hour week, 

8:30-4:30, Monday-Friday only. 

Salaries commensurate with experience. 

Excellent benefits, Pleasant working 

atmosphere. 

Call JoAnne Nichols today 

(708) 578-3244 



EOE 



|( 111 



20 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



is! 
or 

ry 

e 
B 

J 

ilTI! 



is 
e 
nt 
;e 
irk 
nd 



iiiimr. 



5 



getlc 

/born 

Live 

Be- 



llini/ has 
1 Muter 
In Social 

[I 

ly County 
ind Innrity 
provided 



ograms ol 
i children, 
i. 




Schools/ 
Instruction 



N 



TRAINING 

ELECTRONIC 

OFFICE MACHINE 

REPAIR 

NO COST 

to quafHIod individuals 
Tha ITT Technical Institute in 
Hoffman Estates in cooperation with 
Lake County Private hdusty Councl 
jab training Is offering a 13 week 
Electronic Olfice Machine Repair 
Training courts followed by place- 
ment assistance. Learn to maintain 
and repair copy machines, type- 
writer and other office equipment. 

II you are IByearsolageor older, 
recently laid-off, JTPA efigibis, have 
a valid drivers license, have a car, 
live In Lake County, and are 
interested In an electronics repair 
'caroer, this is an opportunity for yout 
Training begins January 1 3, 1992. 

Call Jim at (708) 519-9300 or 
Margaret at (70S) 249-2200 between 
9:00 am and 5:00 pm Mon.-Fri. and 
ask about the Electronic Ollice 
Madiino Repair Program. 

ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 

375 W. Higgins Rd. 
Hoffman Estates, IL 60195 

A Service ol ITT 

Educational Services, Inc. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



JACK'S 
REMODELING- 

bathrooms, basements, 
partition walls, etc. Free 
estimates. (708)546- 
3759. ^ . 



Trees/ 

Plants 



S 4 5 



f"' 



TREE WORK 



• Tree Trimming 

• Tree Removal 

• Beaut'rficatlon 

• Stump Removal 
(708) 546-2061 



Wedding 



S47 



GETTING MARRIED- 
very nice mens wedding 
ring, size 14 weighs 6.5 
pwt. 14 kt. gold. Has only 
been worn for 6 months. 
MUST SELL! $100 or best 
offer, Call (708)669-6191 
after 5 p.m. Mon-Frl. 
anytime Sat and Sun. 




MARKETIGIIIDE 




Appliances 



[MUST SELLI-LARGE 
[upright freezer, $125. 
[(708)223-9149. 
31-51-76 

tu«ineB8/()ffice 
Equipment 

[OFFICE COPY- 

[machine, mint condition, 
^fvlany automatic features. 
iOost, $1,700, sacrifice at 
•f$450. (708)729-5626. 
35-4-4 

Electronics/] 
Computers 



Farm Guide' 




.© 



ALL STEEL 

buildings. New never 
erected. 40x42 was 
$6,177 now $4,964; 
40x120 was 13,635 now 
$10,295; 50x200 was 
$25,000 sell for $18,^95. 
Can deliver. (303)757- 
3107. 

37-00-16 



Firewood 



© 



gi 



IBM PC&XT BOTH- 

with 3.5, 5.5 & HD drives, 
Epson printers, NEC 
splnwriter, work station, 
key board drawers, 
cables, switches, etc. 
Call (815)385-2329. 
36-1-19 

TANDY COMPUTER- 

TRS-80, includes 1 disc 
drive, printer, software 
(educational and games), 
$200. (708)587-3462. 
36-2-32 



SEASONED QUALITY 
FIREWOOD-Full cord 
special, $135. (708)223- 
2707. 

38-1-31 



Horses & 
Tack 




TRAILERS TRAILERS 

50+ new/used horse, slock, 

Italbeds. Bumper/Gooseneck, 

Sleel/Atuminum. Trailer parts. 

BUY -SELL -TRADE 

THE CORRAL 

Hwy 18, Sullivan, Wl 531 7B 

(414) 593-8048 



Horses & 
Tack 




SADDLE SHOP 

250 new/used WestenVEng 5sh 

saddles, Including CIRCLE Y. 

Lowest prices anywherel 

BUT -SELL -TRADE 

THE CORRAL 

le.Sullfvtn.WI 53178 
(414) 593-8048 




1IUCS 

mi 

jurs, 
ys 

der 

ft 

iek, 
i- 

ience. 
<ing 




ft SADDLE 5 

% FOR SALE H 

a Hardly Used m 

I J Barrel-Racer 15-1/2". Jj 

I I Very light. Good for adult u 
a or child. Perfect Condition u 

$250 

438-8060 

n Before 8 PM { 



BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 ,000 - Cash & Carry 
Hay, Straw & Horse Feed 

H0RT0N BROS. 

Bristol, Wl 

(414) 857-2525 



Mon.-Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-3 



!Uj.' w -h£ Jj 



Now Open 

HomeStead StablesJ 



Horses boarded $190 a month 

12x12 box stalls with dutch doors & Individual 

paddocks. Daily turnout included & much more. 

Give us a visit— located in Bristol, Wl on State 

Line Rd. 4 mites from Anlioch 

(414) 857-9885 or 

(70S) 395-0332 



ary3, 1992 



January 3, 1992 



Homes 
For Sale 




BUILDERS 
MODELS-must sell, 
consider contract sale to 
qualified party all have 
attached garages, 
central air, and many 
extras. Fox Lake, 3 
bedroom, 2 bath ranch, 
250 s.f., $123,900. Is- 
land Lake, 4 bedroom, 2 
bath, bi level, 1900 s.f. 
$144,900. McHenry, 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, bilevel, 
2,000 s.f., $135,900. 
Crystal Lake unincorpo- 
rated, 3/4 bedroom, 2 
bath raised ranch, 1 acre 
lot, 2750 S.f., $189,900. 
Under construction. 
Crystal Lake unincorpo- 
rated, 3 bedroom, 2 
bath, 1500 s.f. 
$139,900. McHenry 
unicorporated, 3 
bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, 
raised ranch, 2470 s.f. 
$149,000. Can help ar- 
rates. (708)526-8306. 
50-2-40 




Households/ 

Furniture 

KIRBY VACUUM- 
attachments, $200. 24', 4 
harness loom, stand, 
yarn, $300. (414)697- 
0514. 

43-52- 26 

Lawn/ 
Garden 




Seasoned 
Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

Land Clearing 

Tree & Stump Removal 

Fully Insured 

708-5X6-0858 



Mieccllancou 



CAMCORDERS- 
VCRs, wholesale, 42 
Brands, no tax, Free UPS 
delivery. Free camcorder 
buyers guide, (none for 
VCRs). Call with Model 
wanted for our price. 
(800)344-7123. 
DERMA SHIELD- 
The ultimate skin 
protection product mado 
In America. Skin 
protection ranges from 
household cleaners to 
acids. For no obligation 
recorded message, call- 
(319)678-2129. 
BABY BATH- 

bassinet, boy and girl 
infant clothes. All in very 
good condition. (708)263- 
8842. 

BLACK MARBLE-6 
person spa, loungers and 
individual seating, 
bubblers, jets, tights, 
seater skirt, 110-220, 
convertible system. 
(708)223-7431. 



WEDDING DRESS 

Feel like Cinderella when 
you walk down the aisle in 
Ihis gorgeous while wedding 
dress detailed with pearls 
and iridescent sequins. 
Swoothean neckline, long 
sleeves, modlum length 
detailed train. Size 10. 
Retailed from Voile's at 
$825. Price negotiable. 
Leave a message and I'll get 
back lo you. 

(815) 363-0542 



^ 



P 



Musical 
Instruments 



; 



HAMMOND ORGAN- 
mahogany, 2 keyboards, 
bass pedals, $700. 
(708)566-8700. 
FOR SALE- 

Yamaha Console, 3 
years old, excellent 
condition. (708)740- 
0557. 

46-1-3 



Homes 
For Sale 





BY OWNER 

Spring Grove, raised 

ranch, 3 bedroom, 1-1/2 

bath, large family room 

with fireplace, central 

air, laundry room, large 

yard with deck, pool, 

appliances included. 2- 

1/2 car garage. No 

Realtors please, 

$124,500. (815)675- 

2216. 

50-1-7 
FIVE ACRE 

FARMETTE-Lake 

Geneva completely re- 
stored fun of the century 
farm house. Nature land- 
scaping, nice farm. Call 
Joe (414)248-2597, 
$220,000. 

SO r TF-.16/K 
WATERFRONT LONG 
LAKE-5 rooms, 2 + 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
includes 2 vacant lots, 
$99,500. (708)398-6474. 
50-44/TF-40 
DEERF1ELD PARK- 
East. newer, 2 master 
bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 
custom finished 
basement, custom 
finished garage, interior 
design, upgrades 
throughout. Must seel 
$136,900. (708)520- 
5724. 
50-2-4 2 

Homes 
For It en I 



@ 



Homes 
For Rent 

GRAYSLAKE 

THREE-bedroom, 
house for rent. No pets. 
$750 plus security 
deposit (708)223-0729. 

51-2-10 
GURNEE COACH- 
house, 2 bedroom, 
country setting, fenced 
yard, garage, Feb.1, 
$600. (708)249-5053. 

51-1-11 
LAKEFRONT-LONG 
Lake/lngleside, two 
bedroom, 1 bath, large 
living room with fireplace, 
kitchen, with dining area, 
all appliances, 2-1/2 car 
garage. Small pets o.k. 
Fenced yard, pier, $850. 
Call (708)587-6502, leave 
message. 

51-2-7 
HOUSE 6+ ROOMS-5 
miles East of Lake 
Geneva. $520/month, 
plus utilities, appliances, 
references, security 
deposit and last month's 
rent. (708)948-5448. 

51-1-23 




ROUND LAKE- 

BEACH very clean 4 
bedroom tri-leve! on quiet 
st. Available Jan. 1. 
$740/month and security 
deposit. Credit 
references required. 
(708)945-5217. 
51-2-43 



2HomesToRenUl! 

Round Lake Beach 

Clean, 3 bedroom ranch In 

Grayslake schools. 

Fox Lake 

Only 1 yr. old I 
3 bedroom house. 

Only $750 /mo. + security 
deposit. 

Why rent an apartment when 
you can live in a house for the 
same price? 

Hurry, these won't last. 
Available early Doc, 

Evenings call: 

708488-7175 

or 
7084323-3781 




Musical 
Instruments 





THREE-KEYBOARD 

Thomas Trianan Organ. Full 
music background with 
Lesslie speakers, has 
additional Lesslie 
speakers. Excellent 
Condition $2,500 or make 
an Otfer. (708)740-0562. 
46-37/TF-99 

ORGAN 

GULBRANSON-$200 or 

trade for ladies accordian. 

(708)487-2716. 



Tela & 
Supplies 




SHIH TZU- 

puppies, males, born 
11/6, AKC. (414)763- 
2350 after 5 p.m. 
47-2-35 
AKC REGISTERED- 
Golden Retrievers, 
declaws removed, with 
shots, $300 each. Just in 
time for Christmas, pick 
up now. For more 
Information, call (815)344- 
7823. 

47-2-36 




BEAUTIFUL AKC- 

Cocker Spaniels. 
Excellent temperament. 
Must see to appreciate! 
Females, $275. Males, 
$225. Only 3 left! 
(708)872-3903. 

47-1-37 
BEAUTIFUL AKC- 
Dalmatian pups, 6 weeks 
old. (708)587-8035. 

47-1-38 
BEAGLE PUPPIES- 
AKC, (414)537-4746. 

47-1-39 

BC Dog Trading 

(Better Canines) 

See 
Direct Line Ad 



Pels & 
Supplies 



BLACK PIANO- 

clean, great condition, 
only needs to be tuned, 
$600. (708)831-4946, 
46-2-33 

LOVEABLE HOME- 

onlyl Male, yellow 
Laborador, loves people. 
(708)356-6470 for 
screening. 

47-2-21 
CHINESE SHAR-PEI- 
puppies in time for 
Christmas. Starting at 
$200.(414)652-3005. 

47-1-41 

GERMAN SHORT- 

haired pups, 16 weeks 
old, males, excellent 
bloodline, $200. 
(414)652-1771 or (414) 
552-5340. 

47-1-40 
HAPPY JACK 1HIVER- 
MICIDE-recognized safe 
and effective by Centor for 
Veterinary medicine 
against hook, and round 
tapeworms in dogs and 
cats. Available O-T-C at 
better farm food and hard- 
ware store. 

47-00-2 
CHINESE SHAR- 
Pei puppies, $200, 
starting at $200. 
(414)652-3005. 

47-1-6 

REGISTER TOY- 
Fox Terrier puppies. 
(414)279-2012. 



47-1-5 



Wanted 
To Buy 



jg 



SLOT MACHINES 

any condition, for parts. 
Also Old Wurlitzer Juke 
Boxes, paying cash. 
(708)985-2742. 

49-53-37/G 
CORVETTE WANTED- 
any yoor or condition. 
Also, antique cars, 
convertible, street rods or 
collector cars. Finders fee 
paid. (414)245-9395. 

49-19-4/G 




Homes 
For Rent 

HOME FOR RENT- 
fairly new, 3 bedroom 
home with fireplace, 
central air, 2+ garage, 
appliances including 
washer and dryer. Near 
Lake Villa border. 
Available Jan. 1, $650 
per month. Will consider 
pets or short lease. Call 
(708)740-8761. 

51-1-8/G 
BY OWNER 1700-sq. 
ft., all Brick air condition 
ranch. 3 bedroom, with 
oak floors, 1-1/2 bath, 
dining room, newly 
remodeled oak eat-in 
kitchen with island. Built 
in range and dishwasher. 
Large Florida room, 
basement, 2 car garage, 
storage barn on two 
corner lots. Appraised at 
$129,600. asking 
$118,900.(708)546-0574. 

51-1-22 



Condon/ 
Town Homes 



ip 




LAKEFRONT TWO- 

bedroom, 2 bath condo In 
town, walk to Fox Lake 
shopping and train, good 
references needed. $675 
per month includes heat 
(708)546-3295. 
54-2-37 

AVAILABLE FOR- 

immediate occupancy. 
Kenosha Townhouse, 2 
bedrooms, 1-1/2 baths, 
washer and dryer hook- 
up, fireplace, den, 
garage, mini blinds 
throughout. Walking 
distance to train, $600 a 
month plus utilities. 
(414)654-4691. 
54-1-24 

AVAILABLE 1-1-92- 

one bedroom, loft 
Townhome, Strawberry 
Condominiums, 
appliances, fireplace and 
more. $600 a month, plus 
utilities, security deposit 
and lease. No petsl 
(708)662-6866. 

54-1-25/G 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 22475 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 
CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 

BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 
Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on OCTOBER 30, 1991. 

I, Max Tyson, Special commissioner for this court will on 
February 6, 1992 at the hour of 9:15 a.m. at the front door ol 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 

1615 Beverly PI., Highland Park, IL 60035 
The improvements on the property consist of single family, 
masonite, one story dwelling with no garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified Funds, balance within 24 

hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 

general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open lor inspection. 

The judgment amount ws $108,177.71. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 

Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 

specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney. 

Fisher and Fisher, 30 North USalle. Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 

4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 

Sales Officer is aoj required to provide additional Information 

other than that set forth in this notice. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 22676 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on OCTOBER 1, 1991. 

I, Max Tyson, Special commissioner for this court will on 
February 6, 1992 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the front door of 
Lake County Courthouse, Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the highest 
bidder for cash, the following described premises: 

15239 Ellen Way. Libertyville, IL 60048 
The improvements on the property consist of single family, 
brick constructed, two story dwelling with an attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount ws $264,314.36, 

Upon the safe being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372- 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer is rjgi required to provide additional information 
other than that set forth in this notice. 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 21972 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on JANUARY 9, 1991. 

I, Fred Herzog, Special commissioner for this court will on 
February 5, 1992 at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at the front door of 18 
North County, Waukegan. Illinois, sell to the highest bidder for 
cash, the following described premises: 

40447 N. Kenosha Road. Son, IL 60099 
The improvements on the property consist of single family, 
wood frame, two story dwelling with no garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sate shall be subject to 
general laxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspection. 

The judgment amount ws $93,900.47. 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSalle, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372 
4784 from 1 :00 p.m. to 3;00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer is rjoj required lo provide additional information 
other than that set forth in this notice. 



Lakeland Newspapers 21 




■ 



< 



i i 



i ( 1 


1 

It". 


m \ 


i 




Mobile 

Homes 




MOBILE HOME-FOH 
rent, Beach Park, 20 
minutes from Base, 
newly remodeled, new 
carpeting, paneling, 
stove, refrigerator, 
washer and dryer, 2 
bedroom, $575 per 
month, 1 month security 
deposit, month to month, 
no lease, no pets, avail- 
able Feb. 1. (708)356- 
0333, leave message. 
55-1-12 



ft For Rent v 

14*70 

Mobile Home 

! Lake Geneva 2 



Area 

Immediate 

Occupancy 

ft $475.00 + Sec. § 

ft (414) 248-3831 8 



Country living With City 

Convenience 

Pioneer Estates is a fine community of single 
family manufactured homes, 
• Recreation / Health Center 'Large Lots 
• Garages Available • Large Playground 

jfiSki , 1-1/2 miles Soulh of Lako 

lrfMTn MTQT r~ Geneva on Hwy H 

m ^ eM "== (414) 248-3831 



ESTATES 



ApartmenlB 
For Rcnl 



LAKE BLUFF 

LARGE-2 bedroom, 
security building, laundry 
facilities, garage 
available, $485 a month. 
Also one bedrooms, 
$425. (708)473-9342. 
WAUCONDA TWO- 
bedroom apartment, 
newly decorated, stove 
and refrigerator, heat 
and hot water included, 
$525 per month, lease, 
security deposit 
■required. No pets I 
Available immediately. 
(708,433-0891. 




Rainbow 
Lake Manor 

New 81 Used Homes 

For Sale 

HOURS: 

Monday - Friday 

9 a.m. -4 p.m. 

Saturday 

8 a.m.- 12 Noon 

Evenings & Sundays 
By Appointment 

(414) 857-2891 



Apartments 
For Hitnl — 



M 



hpSSS 

PAY 'NO RENT 
(your 1st month) 
$300 DEPOSIT 

on 

One Bod room 

•Spacious 

•Private Balconies 

•FREE Heat 

•Short Term Leases avail. 

LAKEVIEW APARTMENTS 

708/587-9277 

•new resident, 1 yr. lease 



Apartment* 

For »fnl 

ONE BEDROOM 
Lakefront apartment, all 
utilities included, no pets, 
$395 a month. (708)395- 
5404. 

Iakeside 

LUXURY 
APARTMENTS! 

•Microwave ovens 

•Washers & dryers 

•Vaulted ceilings 

•Patios or balconies 

•Dishwashers 
•Convenient location- 

(708) 356-0800 

>705 Water's Edge Dr. 

Lake Villa, IL 

On Route 132 (Grand Avo.) Just, 
east of RoUs 83 al Um south 

■Ida of Daop Laka 
^S^ Pialiaiiontfy 
fsf mmgtdby 
~~" UanaometM 

floaty Partners 




Apte. /Homes 
To Share 

THREE YEAR OLD- 

raised ranch, private 
bath, full kitchen privi- 
leges, $325 per month, 
plus security, 20 minutes 
from base, female only. 
(708)356-0333 leave 
message. 

58-1-15 

Check this 

Section Each, 

Week!! 



Bub. Prope 
For Rcnl 



**W M 



Bub. l'ropcrl 
For Rent 



/ 



Koome 
For Rcnl 



m 



v V\^tersEc)ge 



.a_^ 



Lakefront 

Sleeping Room for rent J 
I with private bath & pier, 
I Available Immediately! 
$75/wk. 
Michael Lescher 
Your link to the chain 
(708)587-8117 

Remax Advantage 



ANTIOCH OFFICE- 

Space, newly remodeled 
small and large offices 
form $195 a month, in- 
cluded utilities. (708)395- 
4895. 

61-53-24 



Looking 
For 
Office. 

1 Year 



9 



4000 SQ.FT. INDUSTRIAL 
BUILDING 

Including large office. 

Available Immediately. 

Days (708) 223-1693 
Days & Eves. (708) 566-5564 



SJt- 



ApuritnentB 
For Rcnl 



ffi ra 



VERNON HILLS- 

newly decorated, one 
bedroom apartment, 
$580 month. Heat 
included. (708)566-0186 
alter 4 p.m. 

56-1-14 
ZtOM- AVAILABLE 
immediately. 2 bedroom, 
air, laundry, off street 
parking, $500 month and 
security (708)746-6602. 
PENTHOUSE- 
apartment with view of 
Grayslake from Master 
bedroom. 2 bedroom with 
den, huge eat-in kitchen, 
2 full baths, central air, 
garage, deck, and 
laundry. Must seel Call 
(708)223-7288 for more 
information. 



ZION 2-BEDROOM 

appliances, off street 
parking, new carpeting, 
$475. {708)223-2466. 

KITCHENETtE-ALL 

utilities paid. 326 W. 
Liberty Street, 

Wauconda, $425 a 
month. (708)566-1465. 
ONE LARGE- 

Bedroom apartment on 
Fox Lake. Private patio 
with lake view. Heat 
included. $550 a month. 
Available Jan, 1. 
(708)587-0840. 
56-1-44 

DEEP LAKE 
HERMITAGE 

Spacious 1 & 2 bedroom 
apartmonls. Wall to wall 
carpet. Appliances 
Included, ample closet 
space. Free gas heat & 
cooking. Scenic, quiet 
country selling features 
tennis & basketball courts, 
a lot lot, laundry rooms. 
Sorry, no pets. 

Call Mon.-Fri. 
9 a.m. -6 p.m. 
(708)356-2002 

Equal Housing Opportunity 



W 




FREE RENT! 

Enjoy The Holidays 

at 

LAKEWOOD VILLAGE APARTMENTS 

Our Holiday Gift To Youlll , . . One Free Month's Rent (1 st month) H you move into one of our 
beautiful, new apartments in January 1992 and sign a one-year (ease. Use the extra cash tor 
moving expenses or holiday; gifl-givingl (Applies only to now applicants) 
Phase I & II rented; Phase III Available Now II _ 
Amenities: 

•2 Bedroom Apartments 
'Stove. Refrigerator. Dishwasher. 

Disposal 
•Air Conditioning 

• Walk -In Closets 

'Patios and Balconies 

'Carpeting 

•Window Blinds 

'On-site Manager 

'Laundry Rooms on First Floor 

'Locked (inside) Mall Boxes 

•Garage Available 

Call Manager 414-877-4129 



Free 
Rent 

With 6 year lease. 

2844 sq.ft. 
8 Private Offices 
Waiting Room ; 
Would consider 

leasing 1 12 
' Rte.134- X 
; Round Lake 
Call 

708-540-7000 



INDUSTRIAL 
SPACE 



Fountain Head 
Corporate Center 

okRt. 12 di Richmond 

Superior 2,400, 4,800 
square foot unit 

$945.00/51 ,890.00 Gross! 

Dock 17ft /1 811 Ceilings, 

A/C Office 

LAND MANAGEMENT 
(815) 678-4771 



Lois/Acreage 
Farms 




THREE 
house 



on 



LOTS- 

one, 



overlooking Fox Lake. 
$115,600. (708)223- 
5590. 



Shop For 
A New Car 

Calf 
(708) 223-81 61 




BtTR 

Property Management 
Inc. 



4015 - 80th Street 

Kenosha, Wisconsin 53142 

(414) 697-9616 



NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

OUR FILE NO. 22196 
(IT IS ADVISED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES 

CONSULT THEIR fiWH ATTORNEYS BEFORE 
BIDDING AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice Is hereby given pursuant to a Judgement 
entered in the above entitled cause on OCTOBER 2, 1991. 

I, William Levinson, Special commissioner for this court will on 
January 31, 1992 at the hour of 9.00 a.m. at the front door ol 
Lake County Courthouse, 1B N, County SL, Waukegan, Illinois, 
sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described 
premises: 

261 Steeplechase Rd., Barrlngton Hills, IL 60010 
The Improvements on Hie property consist of single family, two 
story, brick constructed, two story dwelling with a two car 
attached garage. 

Sale Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds. No refunds. The sale shall be subject to 
general taxes and to special assessments. 

The property will NOT be open for inspectioa 

The Judgment amount was $288,443.63 

Upon the sale being made the purchaser will receive a 
Certificate of sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorney, 
Fisher and Fisher, 30 North LaSaile, Chicago, Illinois. (312) 372 
4784 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however under Illinois law, the 
Sales Officer Is noj required to provide additional Information 
other than that sol forth In this notice. 






LAKELAND MORTGAGE MARKET 



976-8500 



(A Service Of Mortgage Market Information Services And Lakeland Newspapers) 
MORTGAGE HOTLINE FOR DAILY MORTGAGE NEWS, UPDATES AND TODAY'S MOST COMPETITIVE RATES p*m») 



976-8500 



lO-Doc 



30 Year Daily Rate Chart 

17- Doc 10-Ooc ID.Doc PODoc 



15 Y»nr lnHr»»l Rate » 



0- 
3.75" 



B.B- 
5.2S-: 



0-; 
7.73 



o 
■B.75 



ro.fi 
a.2S 

: 

re 



'7.75 



30 Yr Jumbo E3 30 Year Fixed 



30 YenrFHA 




20-Ooo 



ts.peo 
Intoiojl rotas based on three polnte 



ifi Yr JuirOo 
ISY..iFb«j 
7 Yr Oalkwn 



Dec 30 Existing Home Sales {Nat'i Assn: Realtors) 

Dec. 31 Index of Leading Economic Indicators 

Dec. 31 Consumer Cor^dcnce (Conference Board) 

Jan. 2 National Purdiatf tig Managers? Business Survey; 

•!•;•!•: ; x- 't-x-.-vx-x-x-. .;•'.■'■'. x-Xv. x-x-xvX-x-x-x-xx - ; 

I.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.; .;. .y.v-.v .v.;.;.y..v.vAV/.;Av.;.v v ;.;.;^.^v. 



RATE TYPE 



PTS/FEES DOWN LOCK CAPS 



HATE TYPE 



PT5/FEES DOWN LOCK CAPS 



RATE TYPE PTS/FEES DOWN LOCK CAPS 



RATE TYPE PTS/FEES DOWN LOCK CAPS 



Advantage Bank 

8 SOyrFlx 3/295 

•.5 SOyrFlx Q/2B5 

5.75 1 yr ARM 1/295 



708-362-9300 

5% U day* - 
5% 60 dnv t 
10% New Construction 



comments: ConsUuc loan *peclalltta - lot loan* avail. 
& 1 1 13 S. Milwaukee Ave., Llbertyville 60048 



American Home Finance 815-385-1940 

B.5 30yrFU 0/270 5% 60 day* 

7.625 7yrBaltoom- 0/270 10% 60 day ■ +7/23 
7.375 Syr Balloon* 0/270 10% 60dayi '5/25 
comment*: Wtueondt office, Apt, Bldaa., 2nd Mortgage*, FHA/VA. 
0&m 651 W. Terra CotteSte #110, Crystal Lake 60014 



Associated Financial 1-800-371-7777 

7.875 30yrF!x 2.5/295 10% 60 day* 

8.375 SOyrFlx*- 2/295 10% 60 day* +J umbo 

7 7 yr Balloon' 2.25/295 10% 60 day* '7/23 

commerrt*: 706-291-6560 

ffi S55 Skokio Blvd. Ste. 300, Northbrook 60062 



Block & Co. 

7.5 SOyrFlx 

8.5 30 yr Fix 

7 15yrRx 



5.757295+ 5% 
0/295+ 5% 
5.5/295+ 5% 

comment*: Call for 2nd mortgage*. 

ffiffi 5 Market Square Ct. Lake Forest 60045 



708-295-5554 

60+ day* 
60+ days 
60+ day* 



Capitol Federated 

7.875 SOyrFlx 3/300 

e.5 SOyrFlx 0/300 

7.375 15yrF1X 3/300 



comment*: Rolling Meadow*: 708-398HOME. 
ffiffi 17 E. Crystal Lake Rd. Crystal Lake 60014 



815-477-4999 

10% 60 day* 
10% 60 day* 
10% 60 days 



Chief Financial 708-304-0470 

8.125 15yrRx 0/295 10% 45 days 

8.5 30yrFJx 0/295 10% 45 days 

B 30yrFlX+ 0/295 10% 45 day* +Jumbo 

comment*: REFINANCE MOW! HOJUNKFEESI 

m 200 N. Northwest Highway Barrlnglon 60010 



Countrywide Funding 

6 SOyrFlx 2.125/280 
4.625 1 yr ARM 2.075/260 

7 7 yr Balloon' 1.625/260 



708-816-1377 

5% 60 day* 
10% 60 day* 
10% 60 days "7/23 



comment*: Cut out mrddHman-apply dricUy w/tiii mtg. banJcir, 
fflffl 1023 N Milwaukee Ave.. Llberlyvllle 60046 



GMAC Mortgage 

7.875 5/1 yr ARM 2/295 
8.625 30 yr Fix* 2/295 

6.375 Jumbo 1*1 rat* 2/295 



comment*: 397-QMAC, Schaumburg office. 
35 175 E. Hawthorne #225 Vernon Hllta 60061 



708-680-5090 
0% 60 days 
0% 60 days 'Jumbo 
0% 60 days 



JM Mortgage Services 

4.675 1 yr ARM 3/295 

7.75 20 yr Fix 3/295 

7.5 15yrFlx 2.5/295 



708-291-7870 

20% 60 days 
10% 60 day a 
10% 60 day* 



comment*: Arm* to 1 mil. 24 hr an*w. mach. 2nd mtgea. avail. 
a 3340 Dundee Rd. Northbrook 60062 



Lake Cook Mortgage 

8.5 30yrFlx 0/295 

8 15yrFIX 0/295 

7.625 7 yr Balloon' 0/295 



708-441-5121 

10% 45 days 
10% 45 days 
10% 45 days 



•7/23 



comments: 0-potnt programs. Good Jumbo rates. 
SR 550 Frontage Rd. Ste 272 NorthliekJ 60003 



Fox Valley Mortgage 

9,5 30yrFlx 0/265 

7.675 SOyrFlx 2.5/285 

8.875 30yrFIX+ 0/265 



1-800-339-9868 

10% 60 days 
10% 60 days 
10% 60 day* +Jumbo 



comment*: 2nd mortgages available. We make house calls. 
Affi 71 15 Virginia St. Cry rial Lake 60014 



North Shore Mortgage 

• 30yrFlx 3/295 

6.875 5yrBaIloon+ 3/295 
8.25 30 yr Fix* 3/295 



Norwest Mortgage 

6 SOyrFHA 1/270 

7.675 20yrRX 2.75/295 

5.75 1 yr ARM 0/295 



comment*: Jumbo Loans Available, 
fflffi 175 E, Hawthorne, Vernon Hilts 60061 



708-680-4800 

3% 60 day* 
5% 60 day* 
10% 60 day* 



TCF Mortgage 

8.125 30yrF1X 2.375/280 5% 

8 30yrFHA 2.1 25/255 3% 

6,75 5 yr Balloon 2.25/280 10% 

comments: ARM'* good up to 500,000. 

raa 830 West End Ct., Vernon Hill* 60061 



708-367-0570 

60 day* 
60 day* 
60 days 



United Mortgage Service 708-480-0101 

8.5 30yrFIx 0/295 10% 60 days 

8 ISyrFlx 0/295 10% 60 days 

7.5 7yrARM* 2.25/295 10% 60 days 'Jumbo 

commend; Ho doc, condo, {umbo*, Investment laoni snd 2nd mtget «va) labia, 
ifi m 3000 Dundee Rd. #308 Northbrook 60062 



708-295-8160 

10% 60 days 

10% 60 days +5/25 

20% - 60 days 'Jumbo 



comments: Evanston 708-475-1300, Wlnnstkn 706-446-7472 

iBffi 560 Oakwood, Lake Forest 60045 



LEGEND: lllnoiiRssBsnlhl Kfaflpt* UtwiM tllWik B Sivinp t> Lo*i A* Mortp [• !Wik*r A Mcnl(j[« Brok« FunJi provklMl by snoilwtmKry i«tikh mytSltafiUfUm ni^l isdunts widwul neths. SURVEY! 12/26/9) 
Infcirmlkxi knfaMViJsii lly oxrsTilioJ by Mwpp MjjUi WomuotnStmc*. o« slfiUtlsd wiih i\y /uvsmisl Uitiliuiloft cc rssl nun [roup, <nd \t ticl^vad »ob»»ramMbmnolwsirinl»d, >7+HW»*wgn!yfiv«iBiHr*t minun CCgn'rirJil 1W2. »M, HW, IW>, 1991, 



Wonderlic Richmond Bank 70B-587-4710 

7.875 MyrRx W75 5% 60 days 

7.5 ISyrFlx 3/275 5% 60 days 

7 7yrBal!oon+ 3/275 10% 60 days +7/23 

comment*: pt*. available. Wise, property alio available. 

SRSi, 10910 Main St. Richmond 60071 



LENDERS CALL BECKY HALL (70S) 834-7555 



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22 Lakoland Nowspapors 



Januarys, 1992 



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)iiuwmo 



ATVb 



D " ot dft 1 

e iunv. *- 



TRANSPORTATION 



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<e. 
23- 



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mem 

rill on 

ior ol 
inois, 
ribed 



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o car 

Hin24 
[ect to 



aivo a 
dona 
to law. 
to may, 
2) 372 
aw, the 
malion 



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1:13111! 



APS 



1800 



7-0570 



0-0101 



'Jumbo 

}M ivallibte. 



7-4710 



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HnHe. 



J34-7555 



t<:norl/Vac. 



fla 



Oul Of Area 
Properly 




LORIDA FREE 

)OOKLET-How to buy 
lour retirement home in 
Florida. Free Central 
riorida map, and more. 
Phone toll-free. Leesburg, 
Florida. 1(800)533-5940. 
64-00-1 



SAUGATUCK.MICH. 

Mom & Pop businesses lor ulef Soft 

tervs lea cream but., A bidg. County 

bv/loungo w/luid for empgmd. Alto 

spadoui 5 tarm homo v/di pod, 2 1/2 

landscapod acres. Priced to Sell 

Sylvia Gravos-RE/MAX 

Saugatuck Douglas. 

616-857-1761 



POLARIS INDY 
Trail, excellent condition, 
low miles. $1,500. 
{708)587-1152. 
71-1-27 




: LORIDA/DISNEY AREA 

Mow 3 BR, 2 BA, Single Family 

Vacation Homos available, 

;ompleioly furnished & fully 

quippod. Handicapped house will 

avail, alior Fobruary '92. From 
625 par week. Call Today! 

1 -GO 0-373 -VILLA (0455) 



INAPLES, FLORIDA 

i/go soloclion ol goll course condos 
itihin m'nules d gull and shopping. 

an.- Mar. from SlSOO/rranlh. Also a 
limited number of condos within 
patting distance lo the beach from 

SOOOfmonlh. 

DENTAL ASSOCIATES OF NAPLES, INC 

1-800-828-0042 



Ileal Kslalc 
Misc. 

webuy" 

mortgages 

•nationwide* 

Free Quote 
(708) 526-4101 




; DUBUQUE, IOWA Bed & Breakfast! 
SKI S RIVER BOAT G AMBLING PKGS, 

I Romantic Victorian mansion vr/Lovely 
panoramic Missbsippi View. Whirlpools, 

pvt, Baths, Fifeptacos, Ful Brkfsl 

(v.'coniplimonbry Qovoragos. $76£1 50 

THE HANCOCK HOUSE 

II OS Grove Tern DuBuquo, I A 52001 
(319) 557-8989 



Snowmobile 
ATVa 



SI 



1989 SKI-DOO- 

Formula Plus, w/521 
Rotax liquid cooled motor, 
upjetted carbs. and 
balanced track, 500 
miles, like new, with cover 
and 2 place trailer, 
$3,400.(815)338-1191. 
71-2-55 



SporiB 
Equipment 



HEY SKI BUMS- 
Men's Solomon Ski- boots. 
SX91, volume 340 Red 
Boot. Size 10, make an 
offer. Also, Women's 
Solomon Ski-Boots. 
SX61, Size 9, white boot, 
2 years old. Make an 
offer. Call or leave 
message. {815)363-0542. 
75-TF-14/G 

PARAMONT MIILT1- 

station exercise machine, 
170 lb., weight stack, 
chrome, like new, $900. 
Nautitis hip and back 
machine, $500. (708)432- 
8915. 

75-2-56 

ATTENTION- 
EXERCISERS lifestyle 
2000 stepping machine, 
monitors speed, distance 
and time, and calories 
burned, Bought for $250. 
Will sell jorS175. Before 5 
p.m. (414)077-3577 (Kim) 
or (414)877-3743 after 5 
p.m. • 

75-2-57 






3m 







.■• -V- 



Build Your Home This Winter 



Pick Big Savings! 

Get Choice of one of the 
following 

• 3 FREE GE® APPLIANCES 
(Stove, Refrigcralor, Dishwasher) 

• 50% OFF ALL Your Appliances 

• 50% OFF Merillal® Cabinet Upgrades 
anil choice of Two Appliances 






Welcome Home. 




Wvut&it 



AMfHCAS CAUTCIMAHCR 




County line Builders 

216 Janet Drive 

Island Lake 
708-526-8306 



Triple "A" Builders 

34390 N. Rt. 45 

Lake Villa, IL 

708-223-7900 



Cars 
For Sale 



M 




1989 NISSAN- 

Pickup truck with cap, 
$59.95. 1988 Geo Metro, 
$1,995. 1987 Plymouth 
Horizon, $1,595. 1985 
Mitsubishi, $1,595. 1984 
Chevy Cavalier, $1,595 
ask for Skip or Jordy. 
(708)395-4144. 
80-1-22 
1986 HONDA- 

Accord LXI hatchback, 
charcoal grey, 
automatic, excellent 
condition, $5,800 firm. 
(708)367-8580. 
80-1-20 
1986 OLDSMOB1LE- 
Regency, 82,000 miles, 
good condition, $4,195 
or best offer. (708)367- 
5808. 

80-1-23 
NEED TRANSPORTA- 
TION? Whether you want 
to get there by car, boat, 
motorcycle, whatever: Look 
first in Lakeland Classified 
(708) 223-8161 



Cars 
For Sale 

1976 CHEVROLET- 

Monte Carlo, runs welt, 
low mileage. $200 or 
best (708)487-2087. 
80-1-19 

SEIZED CARS- 

Government confiscated 
Corvettes, cars, trucks, 
and other items starting 
at $100. Your area. Call 
1(800)821-4016. Open 7 
days until 9 p.m. 

80-2-28/G 
1985 OLDS 88-4 
door, V8, no rust, 
excellent condition, one 
owner, $3,750. (708)362- 
3248. 

80-2-29 
77 OLDS CUTLASS- 
white, vinyl top, 2 door, 
45,000 miles. Mother-in- 
laws car. Very clean I 
Willing to barter. $1,000. 
Call Richard, (708)587- 
2464 or (708)587-2970. 
80-1-30 



HHiliHtWHMTE. 






I 



I 11 i 



$to JJU o l8fo*s& o P~ 

n 



O-M.9.VU0- 




SERVE EVERYONE 

Classified Ad 
Order Blank 



Word Rate Ads 



10 wolds '300, 15c lor each addtamalwoid (prepaid} 
10 words M.50 .15c lor each additional word (lo be Wed) 
(Private Party Only) 

Count words. Phone numbers and 
hyphenated words count as one word. 

Write Copy Below: 



Name: 



Address: 
Town: 



Phone: 



Run Ad (dale): 

Under Whal- Category 

Enclose check & mall to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney P.O. 116x268 
Gmyslukc. I J, 60030 

or FAX (708) 223-8810 

Wc also ncccpl Visa & MasterCard 
For more iiirommllon, call 

(708) 223-8161 



Care 
For Sale 



ftO 



76 FORD F150- 

Supor Cab, too many 
NEW parts to list. Must 
see to appreciate. 
(708)838-2411, anytime. 

80-1-15 
1980 BONNEVILLE- 
doesn't run, good parts. 
Best offer. (708)689- 
4181. 

80-1-16 
81 PONTIAC GRAND- 
Prix, recent work, runs 
great, must sell. $1,250 
or best. (708)838-241 1 , 
anytime. 

80-1-17 
84 SUBARU GL- 
71,000 miles, stereo, 
cruise control, sport 
luggage rack, black, 
excellent condition, 
$2,200, or best. Call 
(708)587-6502 leave 
message. 

80-2-18 

1938 PLMOUTH- 

Realiant, one owner, ex- 
cellent condition, auto- 
matic, air conditioning, 
am/fm, power locks, 
$4,500. (708)639-4093. 
80-1-21 

1991 PONTIAC- 

Formula, 10K miles, 
am/fm cassette, 
equalizer, Pioneer, 6 disk 
changer, every available 
power option, 5.7 with T- 
tops. $2,000 and take 
over payments. (708)949- 
6734. 

80-2-48 
1988 HONDA- 

Accord, no money down, 
assume lease, $258 a 
month. (708)8164540. 

80-2-49 
1971 CHEVELLE- 
front end damage, extra 
parts, front clip, $500. 
(708)487-2518. 

80-1-50 

1987 CHEVROLET- 

Sprint, 3 cylinder, 5 
speed, manual 

transmission, power 
steering, two door 
hatchback, am/lm stereo, 
31,000 miles, 40 mpg 
city, excellent condition, 
$2,500 or best olfer. 
.(708)615-1928 evenings 
and weekends. 

80-1-61/G 

82 WHITE RABBIT- 

standard transmission, 
tinted windows, runs 
good, many new parts. 
$800 or best offer. 
(708)688-2296 ask for 
Mark. 

80-1-62 

1988 ACURA- 
Ledgend L, 4-door, 
automatic, power 
windows and locks, 
sunroof, tilt and cruise, 
anti-lock brakes, leather 
interior, alloyed wheels, 
completely rust free, 
heated power mirrors, 
factory alarm, only 
29,000 miles, garagod 
always, $12,950. 
(312)481-9325. 

80-1-64 



Cam 
For Sale 




8 



TOYOTA 1984- 

Camry, 4 door, air, cruise, 
good condition, $2,900 or 
best offer. Must sell! 
(708)490-1812. 
80-1-47 



ane 



M 



14' ALUMINUM- 
step van, $3,800. 
(708)395-6600. 

85-1-30 
1983 DODGE CAR- 
GO-Van, 1 ton, 360 V8, 
runs great, excellent work 
van. $1 ,500 or best offer. 
Call Ralph at (708)546- 
5809 or (708)390-8050, 
ext 667. 

85-TF-29 
1979 FORD- 

window van, V8, 
automatic, runs great. 
Good tradesman vehicle, 
$600 or best offer. 
(708)395-5554 or leave 
message. (708)395-3336. 

85-2-51 



Trucks/ 
Trailers 



3H 



1983 JEEP CJ7- 

soft top, 4 new tires, 
$4,200 or best offer. Call 
Doug at (414)877-3832 
days or evenings. 
86-1-32 

1988 FORD-F250, 
automatic, 351 engine, 
power steering, power 
brakes, air, excellent 
condition, $8,850. 
(708)382-3556. 
86-1-37 

1975 1/2 TON- 
Dodge pickup, power 
steering, power brakes, 
automatic, new top, very 
very, clean, body in ex- 
cellent condition. $1,250 
or best offer. (708)356- 
7927 after 5:30 p.m. ask 
for Frank Sr. 

86-1-35 
91 FORD XLT- 
Ranger, emerald 
green/tone, air, stereo 
with tape, manual 
transmission, alarm, 
bedliner, 2,300 miles, 
asking $9,500 or best 
offer. (708)566-7951. 

86-2-52 
1985 FORD RANGER- 
XLT, V6, auto, power 
steering, air, tilt, cruise, 
power windows and locks, 
Class 3 trailer hitch, cap, 
$3,500 or best offer. After 
6 p.m. and weekends. 
(708)740-2523. 

86-2-53 
1988 S-10-plckup, 4 
cylinder, 5 speed, am/fm 
cassette, air 

conditioning, tool box, 
good runner, must sell, 
leave message, $3,950. 
(708)838-0625. 

86-2-54 

FORD 1979- 

Ranchero Squire, $1,850 
or trade for import. 
(708)548-1207. 
86-1-34 



urch Talk 




Grayslake 




Faith Baptist Church of Lake County, located 
on the northeast corner of Atkinson and Brae 
Loch Rds. near the College of Lake County, 
will sponsor a series of lectures and discus- 
sions led by Dr. Harold J. Brown, Forman 
|professor of Theology and Ethics at Trinity 

>ivinity School in Dcerfield. Dr. Brown will speak on the 

lcme, "The Christian and the State," at both the 8:30 and 
a.m. worship services on Sunday, Jan. 12. At 11:15 a.m. WHdwQod 

lis theme will be "The Christian and Abortion." In the 



held at 7:30 and 9 a.m. with nursery care provided during 
the 9 a.m. Mass. Sunday School meets after Mass from 10 
to 10:30 a.m. Evening Prayer is held on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. 
On Wednesdays, Mass is held at 12:15 p.m., except on the 
third Wednesday of the month when it is held at 6:30 p.m. 
A special study group meets weekly at 7 p.m. at the 
church. For more information concerning this group, call 
(708)356-5352. The Church Thrift Shoppe is open every 
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



vening, after a covered dish supper at 5 p.m., Dr. Brown 
gvill lecture and field questions on "The Christian and Pub- 
'■-. Education." For more information, call (708)223-6249. 

alee Villa 

Sunday worship services for the Church of the Holy 
amily, located at 25291 W. Lehmann Blvd. in Lake Villa 
ust south of the intersections of Rtcs. 132 and 59), are 



ry3, 1992 




The Wildwood Presbyterian Church, 33428 N. Sears 
Blvd. in Wildwood, will celebrate the Sacrament of the 
Lord's Supper during the 10 a.m. worship service on Sun- 
day, Jan. 5. Elders and deacons will be ordained following 
the sermon entitled "The Gifts We Bring." Child care is 
available for infants through first graders. Sunday School 
for all ages precedes the service at 9 a.m. Call the church 
office at (708)223-0073 for more information. 




Cownttunity 



Bible Church) 
^ 1 



Visit out 0{tiv Church ^Homt 



1 AM — Sunday School 9 AM 
Bruce Ware, Assistant Pastor 
Sunday Evening Service 

New Year's Eve 

Family Night Celebration 

7:00-9:00 PM 

C708) 838-0103 

23201 W. Grass lake Rd., Antioch 
(Just East of 83) 



dnuary 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 23 




: . : -"". ' ■"■ ■ ■ ' 








s 



iWMOHflBU 



iRECYCUNG CENTE 

We buy aluminum cans, aluminum, copper, brass, 
stainless steel, auto radiators, catalytic converters. 

88 S. Centre Dr. 

: (Intersettionof Rt, 120.& Rt. 134) 

Hainesville; IL 

(708)223-1893 



ganl 7Voen*t&i 

HEATING & 
COOLING 

LENNOX * 

HIGH EFFICIENT 
FURNACES/BOILERS 

PROFESSIONAL 

HEATING SERVICE 

, AIR CLEANERS & 
HUMIDIFIERS 

. WATER HEATERS 
Competitive Pmcta 

(708) 526-6286 
(815)459-2300 

Swvlng Your Community 
.^v SALES-SERVICE 

fl' An Independent Lennox Dealer 
For 25 Yew* 



5 "Whew we train yau to bain your dog' 

2 • Puppy Nndecgailfln • Conformation- 
\\ 2 ma- 5 1/2 mo. BeglnneniAoVancsd | 

▲ •BoglnneriObadence .Tattooing . 

Pi 6 ma a up... .problem Solving 

| • Advanced beglnneri • Counseling ■ 

H • Competition 

A AD our classes are Entiled in atza 

A (or greater attefflbn and hep with exarcfees. j j 
Call for Class SchedJle y 

W (708) 866-1880 | 



CUSTOM CUT 
CONSTRUCTION 

Specializing In 
WOOD DECKS 

Wow Decks • Repairs • Removal of 

Existing Decks 

REMODELING 

Basements • Kitchens ■ BafArown* Be. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Call Steve Welter 

C708) 587-4643 



| Financing 
AvelicWe 



Locally over 40 years 

[ 



24 Hour 
Service 



(708) 837-6290 ^^ 



(414)279-6653 



fl 



ROOFING 



Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



SIDING & TRIM 
SEAMLESS GUTTERS 
-VVINDOWS • DCX)RS ; 
DECKS vAWNlNQS , 
Repair & Insurance Wortc 



Quality 

I Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



.?-****: 



XCL 



by 
GeneGabry , 

566-0094 



Call about 
olher 

assignments. 

Commercial 

accounts 

welcome 






FOUR PAWS 

Training Center 

Oaiie* Starting Every 1° W«ki 

5 levels of instruction offered 

mornings or evenings 

From Pups to Pros 

General Obedience: ' -- ml 

•Puppy Tues 9 AM or Thins 6:30 PM 
•Basic I Tues 10 AM orThurs 7:30 PM 
•Basic II Tues 11 AM orThurs 8:30 PM 
•Competition: Novice Mon 7 PM orThurs 9 AM 
.Competition: Open Mon 8 PM orThurs 10 AM 
708-838-05*3 
20970 White Rd., Antioch 



WINTER JACKET SVUVuOS 



&l 



Many Styles Available 

Including School Award 

Jackets I 



CALL ITEMS and IDEAS (708) 43*7483 





MAIDS ON TIME 

Old Fashioned Cleaning 
With Modern Maids 

•Computerized To Assure 

Same Maid • Top Quality 

Trained to clean your home as their 
own. Our supplies or yours. 

LICENSED • INSURED • BONDED 

(708)540-7754 



QUALITY HfiNDYMflH SERVICES 

. Over 16 years experience in the ^^ t ^ ct ^^\ & 
Providing full time service to homeowners andlano^ 

, 'I^rT^I >/ Electrical ^Carpentry 
-100% Guaranteed} < Plumbing VPainting 



, 



NO Job ■ ^^ Dl« Or ibo Small 

Evening Hours Available (708) 356-3074 




■ 



Serving your painting 

and decorating nbeds. 

Complete Inlcrior/Extcrior 

Quality Work - Neatly Done 

FREE Estimates 

Affordable Prices 

"Have the job done morn!" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24 Ur. Message 




INACOMP* 

compi ler centers 
. Training on Macintosh & IBM 
.Service on all molPi brands 
• 13 technicians to serve youl 

361 1 Grand Ave. 

Gurnee.IL 60031 

(706) 662-2100 



CUSTOM 
DECKS 

By Outdoor Living Specialties 
SPRING SPECIAL 

$6.50 persq. ft. 
• Also Available • 

| FULL LINE OF MAINTENANCE 

• Water Seal • 

• Restoration * 
• Staining • 

CONSULTATION & DESIGN 

Free Estimates 

INSURED 

REFERENCES 

(708)838-0093 

Ajntiocii 



SELF EMPLOYED 

Looking for 

Affordable, cost effective 

Health Insurance? 

Vanishing Deductibles 

Wptf NASE 

National Assdelalion'fortho Sell Employed * 
' "Serving the Needs of Small Business America" 

Call Jerry al 
(708)843-1354 



Tropp "sggJB 

^REESMOUSE 

• Geranium Plants 

• Potted Plants 

of all kinds 

• Perenial Plants 

3 MUcs north of Long Grove, 

1/3 mile north of Route 23 

on Old McIIenry Road 



VINO'S 

Interior & Exterior 

Small Repairs 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

Fully Insured 

Quality Work with Written 

\" v ;- Guarantee 

C708) 526-XX07 



Hill's 
Electric Corp. 

WINTER SPECIALS 

Upgrade Electrical Service Irom 60 
Amp. Fuses to 100 Amp. Breakers 

$950 (Reg. $1250) 

(708) 487-201 6 or 

(800) 97-HILLS 



Secretary for a 




Wauconda 



_s 



SECRETARIAL 
SERVICES 

Word Processing • PC capabilities 

You're only charged with hours 

worked! In-Home office. 

Call for complete details 

(708) 487-3511 Lynn 



COUPON- 1 




BIKING 

Aluminum Cans 

•COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
*LEAD 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 
(708) 587-0788 

HOURS: 

Mon. * Frl. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

closed 12-12:30 tor lunch 

Receive 2<t MORE per pound 

over our current prices on 

aluminum cans 



mOL 



rr 1 



m 



WE BUY: 

Lead • Brass • Copper • Batteries 
I Stainless • Radiators • Aluminum 
Aluminum Cans 
Industrial Accounts Welcome 

T&CMETALCO. 
(8 15} 459-4445 

Mon.— Fri., 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sat., 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

Cloaadbelwoen 12:15 p.m. & 12:45 p.m. 

1 Block South olHwy. 176 

Behind 1&LGao Station 

Keep America Beautiful! 



NOT JUST □ 

COMPUTE BS^ 



122 Petmon Rd. Ubertjrflle, IL 6M48 
Full service computer dealer 

Quality computer products at 
reasonable prices 
Serving Late County for over 5 years 
.New systems 'Networking 
•Repairs 
•Upgrades 



•Consulting 

•Services 

•Clones 



/isn £L 



MUtftOlftC- 



Netware IMe!! 






Network2 computers for 
tmlyPSOIiatalled 
Includes Netware Lite, 

network card, cablini II 

supplies and installation I 

$250.00 for ach | 

■ddiiloaal computer 1 
Call WCfor all your computer needs 1 

(708) 362-6333 | 



Aulhoriicd 
Reseller ' , 




(Ninlendd) ENTERTAINMENT CENTER 

Come in and play your favorite Nintendo games 
ON OUR GIANT SCREEN T.V. 
Rentals - Sales • Accessories 
3 DIFFERENT PARTY PACKAGES AVAILAHLEl 

• CAKE -ICECREAM -SODA 

- PIZZA • 2 HOURS OF GAME TIME 

Over 450 Games to choose from! 

*Trytho 

now Super 

NES 



Call for mora 

detail* an having 

your wunt Birthday 

Party with us. 



ff5!= 



1121 N.Cedar Lake Rd. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

(708)740-LINK 



Check 

Our 

Daily 

Rental 

Specials 



>e- 



OPEN: Weekdays til 8:30 p.m. Saturdays 11-8 pm, Sundays 11-7:30 pm 



January 3, 1992 



1/ It \ V 



. . ■: ' ..,--. 







PAINTING 



^£?SS33&?^ 



VS7^« 5S* • Ca^entry (AH T£es> 

. Specialty Coating (Rag, Sponge. Etc.) 

• Wallpaper Removal & Hanging 

. Restoration • Decorating Consultation & Sennces 

Rainbow Painting Services 






e* 



HOME and ROOM ADOmPN 
PLANNING & DRAFTING 

PAT STAGG & SON, INC. 

TEL: (708) 356-3039 FAX: (708) 35'6-8747 

Over 20 years experience. 

Call today for appointment. 



'm 



loyod 
merica" 



^5^948-80/6 

MATHIESON 

CONSTRUCTION CO. 

For all your 
HI construction needs 
•Kitchen cabinets 
•Kohler plumbing 
•Corian counter tops 

•Wood Floors & 
More 

COMMERCIAL 

RESIDENTIAL 

INDUSTRIAL 

Design, Build or 

Install 

Call Jack 

(708) 948-8075 



raitiliiig.Wnllpnpenng 

Expert Installation 

Paper • Fabric • Vinyl 



DECORATING 

INSURED 

(708) 395-8428 \ 

LAWNWOHK5 

•Trees -Maintenance • Shrubs 
.Sod -Boulder Walls] 



&ft 



\A 






-■ ik .*• ■ *.. 






•Fall Clean-up 
•Snow Blowing 
NO JOB TOO 



SMALL! 

Reasonable 




£L 



abilities 
hours 



GARY'S 
DECORATING 

Interior • Exterior 

Painting & Wallcovering 

For a clean, neat Job at the 

right price. 

14 Years Experience 

Fully Insured 

(708)587-6211^ 

WALLPAPERING 

Residential & 
Commercial 

Leni Baker 
(414) 537-2220 

CALL FOR FREE 
ESTIMATE 



DENNIS ADAMS 
(708) 566-3231 



TAX PREPARATION 



Robert Ritzwoller 

Certified Public Accountant 

•Individual 

•Small Business 

•IRA's 

(708)587-4552 

Free Financial Analysis 

Call for Details 



MTER 



&BLEI 



osn! 



FLO ORS jJ WALK ON 

Carpels • Ilwdwood • Ceramic • Vinyl 

Kitchen & Bulhroom Remodeling 
Rettdsittial & Commercial Installation 

ALL WOHK GUARANTEED 

,Free Estimates 
(708) 356-2500 
(708) 310-5220 




HOME 

REMODELING & 

IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708)587-9729 



WE BOY ] 



| WE 




•COPPEB 
•AUT0BADIAT0BS 

•BRASS 
•STAINLESS STKEI. 

PHONE 
708-2234*4302 



o 

METALS 



.ALUMINUM CANS 

•ALUMINUM 

•BATTERIES 

•LEAD 

32270 M Hwy. B3 

(Just South Of RL 137 Before 

RR Tracks Grayiluke) 



:30 pm 



jary 3. 1992 



January 3, 1992 



Are you looking for a 
new imago? 

JC\ Total Images 

\ • A,\ altars 

1 V .Beau ly control skin care & 

cosmetics 
•Color Analysis 

•Fashion Upa 
Bridal & Formal Consulting 
Karen Jensen 

Certified Image Consultant 
(815)344-8133 
(703J367-1555 

•Gift Certificates Available 



rcc 1 1 Duraclean 

HARDWOOD g 

Custom & Traditional == 

Floors =e 

Installation, Sanding = 

and Finishing g 

(708) 587-7054 S 



Rated best by 
independent tests. 

Carpet & 
Furniture 
cleaning 



ifEiTfr 



SEPTIC & SEWER REPAIRS 

Backyard Drainage Problems Solved 
. Power Redding ■ Sump Pumps 

. Sower Maina * Ejector Pumps 

: we? : .bssas 

Rovitallieo 

Prompt. Courteous Service 
Call lor FREE esllmato: 



1-800-273-3966 



class-si-fled/' klas-o-f ld/adj 
1: divided Into classes or 
placed In a class (-adsi 



Why search 
what you're 
Find it 
Newspapers 



all over for 

looking tor? 

Lakeland 

The REAL 



CALL 
TODAY! 

(708) 

587-2356 



Classitied Sections. 




I 



PSYCHIC 



Diane's Psychic Studio 

Sand. Palm. Tarol. Psychic. Cryslal 
Regular Cards and many m«« typos 01 
loadings. 

Diane's Studio 

is having a two for ono special, with this 
od She tells past as you atone know It. your 
present as It Is. and your future to come, 
wilhout saying a word. For more info. 

.please call: 

541-3105 

Also does parties. 



H J=1 !f f InnrH C!ifl55tfied| 



BALED 
SHAVINGS 

1 Bale or 1 .000 

Cash & Carry 

1/2 mile north SiateUne Rd. 

East of Hwy. 45 on County Trunk CJ 

H0RT0N BROS. 

Bristol, Wl 
(414)857-2525 

Mon. - FrI. 8-5. Sat. 8-3 



Duraclean 

SPECIALISTS 

Duraclean... the standard of 
excellence for over 50 years 



R.A.W. Construction 

Specializing in Carpentry 

• New 

Construction 

• Remodeling 

Free Estimates - 

Insured 

ROY 
708-740-1447 



PHILLIPS SERVICES] 

Exports In homo Improvement 
1 remodeling. Residential or I 
| commercial. j 

prywaH * Intetfor/Exterlor I 
Painting i ♦ Power Washing I 
||gomereptUra*Deoka i -.•■ I 

Bank Financing Available 
: FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)244-6612 



TIM'S 
CONCRETE 

Additions, Garages, 

Driveways 

Walks 

(708) 395-451 6 



KENDALL fiXTOKlOKS 

. Siding • Soffit • Fascia • Trim 

• Seamless Gutters • Decks • Roofing 

. Windows ♦ Doors • Additions -Garages 

FREE ESTIMATES FULL* INSURED 

Ask for John Gebert 

Davs (815) 455-3036 -Eves (708) 587>8772v1 -800-439-4036 



l< 



Fine Homes 



WEDO 



^ 



£^~ Paul Zasadil. 



small parking 



lots 



-Seal Coating 
•Crack Filling 
•Patchwork 
•New Construction 

Protect & Preserve 

FREE Estimate 

(708)546-5809 

AMERICAN 



•New Homes •Renovations 
•Additions •Carpentry 



.^C '■-•' 



iHiti mmwnmr 

^708)566-4724 



Lakeland Newspapers 25 




- ,-. HHBHMMB 




• - '- • 



If 








■■.■■. .v.- ■■......■ 






\IPaVSTaV 

I MaVIKIEIPS 




V8= 



•taulM ftj f uUMUltou* 



Gift Certificates Available 



MMCH SPECIAL 

$2i,£5 Soup & Salad Bar 



We Specialize In Private Parties 

PASTA MAKERS 

127 S. RA1VD RD„ LAKE ZURICH 
LAKEVH3W PLAXA 

S (Lakeview Plaza, next door to the Natural Food Store) 

& (708) 438-1811 





OSCOIHT 





. -:;:■'. 4/l>i^rt*flMWic< **tl 



sliliiiiiii 






5572 §wnA,$ 







^ 



lb 



Restaurant & JSanijuet ^IfaciHttea 

Craciou. dining In the WiUty Stan Country Etlate 

Saturday Luncheon 
Saturday Early Dinners 

Now's ■ beautiful lime to dine in cur 
newly remodeled dining rooms over- 
looking the estate groundi. For lunch 
we htve icup and aandwich, taladi, 
lite' lunches and full luncheons from 
*©,95. Complete 7 course early dinners 
an served from 3 to 6 and are priced 
from *7.95. Your evening is free to 

yourselves] intersection Routes 120 & 4$ 

Grayslake, IL 

— Closed Mondays — 

Alt major crtdit ear At honored 





Your hosts, BUI & Krt* Covai . 



C708) 223-0121 



W 



Imagine the f pastabilities f 



"Fast, healthy and upscale" arc the 
words Mike Forcier uses to describe Pasta 
Makers, the restaurant he and Paul Manz 
opened three months ago at 127 S. Rand 
Rd. in Lake Zurich. 

"It's kind of a new concept," Forcier 
said of the restaurant where customers get 
to "pick and assemble everything they 
want." 

In a combination self-service and host 
environment, diners arc greeted and advised 
of the many menu offerings. After the 
order is placed, it's off to the sumptuous 
salad bar. By the time the customer puts 
together a salad (four to seven minutes), 
the main course is brought out on china. 
The featured fare is the pasta prima v- 
cra, a combination of pastas, vegetables 
and sauce for just $4.95, The customer 
gets to choose one of 12 fresh pastas, one 
of 11 sauces and up to six of 19 vegeta- 
bles for a truly personalized dining 
experience. The salad bar, fresh, hot garlic 
bread and free refills on most beverages are 
all included. 

The pasta choices include spaghetti; 
low-cholesterol, whole wheat, black pep- 
per and basil varieties of linguini; angel 
hair, tri-colorcd rotini; spinach, garlic 
parsley and regular varieties of fcttucini; 
mini-shells; and cheese tortellini. 

The sauces available arc red, white, 
Cajun, mushroom, herb, lobster, spinach 
cream, garlic olive oil, butter and 
Parmesan, Americana, cheese and pesto 
cream. 




6 




The vegetable list is long: mush- 
rooms, green peppers, broccoli, black 
olives, cauliflower, zucchini, tomatoes, 
celery, peas, carrots, onion, spinach, gar- 
lic, pesto, asparagus, artichoke hearts, 
snow peas, sun-dried toms and pine nuts. 

For meat lovers, Italian sausage, 
meatballs, chicken, scallops and calamari 
arc available. 

You can top off the meal with some 
homemade cheesecake in plain, chocolate 
chip, fudge swirl, butterscotch, straw- 
berry, cherry and blueberry varieties. 

Pasta Makers also provides a children's 
menu with most selections for under $3. ^^m^^mk^t*ttt*\%t%%%%m 

Another great deal is the bucket of FlSh BOll 

pasta which serves a family of four for 
only $9.95 and cold pasta salad made to 
order. Carry-out food comes in 
microwaveablc packages for quick 
reheating. . 

And Pasta Makers is ready to meet 
your party needs. The catering plan comes 
with virtually the same set-up as the 
restaurant — complete with china, so 
there's no clean-up for the host. 

"Basically, I bring my restaurant to 
your house," Forcier said. "It's a lot of 
fun. It's very casual. Everybody really en- 
joys iL 

For more information, call (708) 438- 
1811. Pasta Makers is open Monday 
through Saturday from 11 a.m. until 9 
p.m. and Sundays from 2 until 8 p.m. 



1 Casual Dining 

) J Open For Lunch Tues.-Sun. 



•Piano Bar Wed., Fri. & Sat. 
•DJ 10:00 PM - 2:30 AM 



Friday Fish Fry . . . *6.95 

(All You Can Eat) 

Saturday Night Prime Rib 

395-4550 

Rt. 173, Antiooh 




Every Friday 

Served'5:00-9:00p.m. 

•Soup 

•Salad Bar 

•3 Varieties of Fish Plus One Special Entree 

•Fresh Rye & Cinnamon Rolls 
Only $^95 

W All You can Eat 



HIMICOIHU 



._ ._. ^. ATnm A»rm»/i I Ik *?0 . 



I Restaurant & Lounge 
... .-■*. -urtmf • AJtVtK ' 'VUi, 



VjkWa*\7*\ 



Now Serving 
Breakfast Daily 




Buy Any 
Breakfast 
for $3.95 

GET ONE FREE 

Mon.-Fri7a.m.-11;30a.m, 

Rat BraaUatlnul be of aqua! or lauar value 

Expires 1/10/92 



| iffy 



.^v* 




9>{ak£ your Qfcto yta r 's fystrva turns 9{pv) 

I WINTER SPECIALS 

k? \ff rrrtAtj vat w 



£ ALL U CAN EAT 

Includes Soup & Salad 



720 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Gurnee 



FOR INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS 



I 
I 
I 
i 
I 
I 

| S 200 N. Forest - Fox Lake ^ 



7681 

Grand Ave. 

GURNEE 

(2 Mitel W. Of 
Croat America) 



yy 



356-6900 

Dine In Or 
Carry Out 



I 



Sun. & Mon. - Crab Legs .... 'is.9S 

Wed. - BBQ Ribs '11.95 

Thurs. - Fried Chicken '8.95 

Fri. - Fish Fry '6.95 

(Your Choice Cod, Smelt, or Ocean Perch) 



«in,ui "* v -^ *jrt '\W 

[daily lunch? ^s~ 



SPECIALS 

j Starting at '4.95 

! 10% Off Lunches 
Tues.oSat. 



FREE HOUSE 
SALAD 

With Any Pizza 

Carryout 
Order Over no 

k—-- BjPJresy 19/92 



$ 



CALL336-3166 fi \./\JO) 00/-JJY4 



(708) 587-3394 



s 



HOURS: Tuna. Ihru Thurt, 11 im la 10 pm, 
FiiaSil.11wn.i1pm 

Sun. 1 pm to I pm 

LvnchStntd Dilly 11 .4 

Cloiwj Mondtyi 



■ 



H I 









26 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



->*i-*Ha=l«'**^^ 




1 



1 




900 > 
i Or 



Out 

USE ! 

D 

Izza 

it 

r»lo 



9/92 J 









in 





TFORY 



When You Subscribe To Your 
Local Lakeland Newspaper 





2 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION 

$ 26.00 for 1 04 issues 
(only 250 an issue) 



p 

I 

3 


I 


J 

e 

IB! 


v*u9> 

■ yj 

1 

-JOB 

1 H 

H IS 

1 '$n 


01 Rt 11 


c*1 Bl 




ELECTRIC POTPOURRI BURNER 

Yours FREE when you subscribe or renew for 2 

years. The 4 piece set includes the bowl, lid. 

warmer, and cinnamon potpourri. 



§ 



I 




1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION 

$16.50 for 52 issues 
(only 320 an issue) 




10 oz. capacity 



AUTHENTIC WOODEN NUTCRACKER 

Yours FREE when you subscribe or renew for 1 year 

Z Nutcracker is crafted of solid wood and carefully 

hand-painted in choice of colors. 



|NAME 

I 

■ADDRESS. 

I 



I 

1 



'TOWN/ZIP. 



IPH0NE__ 

I INDICATE GIFT CHOICE 

I D 2 YEAR-POTPOURRI- $ 26.00 

J D 1 YEAR-NUTCRACKER- S 1 6. 

|(A voucher will be sent lor 
iyou to pick-up your free gilt) 

B M ail with check to: Circulation Deptartment. 
jLakeland Newspapers, P.O. Box <sbu, 
■Grayslake IL, 60030 

| ' Local delivery only. Lake. CooK.ai>° 



Choose one: 

□ Undenhurst News 

□ Mundelein News 

□ North Chicago Tribune 

□ Round Lake News 

□ Vernon Crier 

□ Warren-Newport Press 

□ Wauconda Leader 

□ Anfioch News-Reporter 
q Fox Lake Press 

□ Grayslake Times 

□ Gurnee Press 
50 □ Lake Villa Record 

□ Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Q Libertyville News 



I 

1 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



I 
I 
I 

'For your convenience send | 
an additional M.50 and we will ■ 

„«r,Hur.iirnifttOVOU. ■ 

I 






send your gift to you. 



McHenry oounties 



9 1/2 "tall, it actually works! 




lakotandH»wspap«rt 27 



January 3, 1992 



iry3, 1992 



ee i. . I ii. 









. 




Lakeland Newspapers 



WR-.H'cJv; v ^r: ■ M^M B|^^MM |^M 



H^^^^H^^B^^SErai 



Warren, Antioch both have close tourney tilts 



i 



Close calls proved to be 
one of the features of the 
Christmas tournament ac- 
tion for both Warren and 
Antioch's boys basketball 
teams. 

The Blue Devils (8-2) 
started the Pontiac tourna- 
ment by losing by three, 
won by 10, then bounced 
back to win the consolation 
title by three. Antioch (4-8) 
started the Rockford Guil- 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Fox Lake Mini Storage will 
sell goods for non payment 
from: Unit 74 belonging to 
Jay Woods consisting of 
household goods. 

Unit 83 belonging to Ed 
Haynes consisting of 
household goods. 

The sate will take place at 
Fox Lake Mini Storage, 31 
South Arlington Lane, Fox 
Lake, Illinois 60020 on 
January 19, 1992 at 10:00 
a.m. 

0192A-246-FL 

January 3, 1992 

January 10, 1992 



Lakeland Classifieds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 



ford tourney with an easy 
win over S Creator, but lost 
three winners' bracket 
games, two by two points. 

"The last two games we 
did not have the intensity 
we needed, We thought all 
we had to do was show up 
and play well enough to 
win," Antioch Coach Jeff 
Dresser said. 

The Sequoits come back 
with an away game with 




FOOT 
PAIN? 

Calipr.LeeTisa 

and Associates 

cast consultation! 







Wutogct Bartington 



Hon 
t(708)33«3» (70S) 57*8722 

K«m»fw 
(4H)65*«16 

Ple**o mention »d when 
muklngyour appt. 



BAD CREDIT? 
NO CREDIT? 

Get a "Fresh Start"... 

Regardless ol Pasl QodilHistotyl 
You can gel your vet/ own 




ihrough Key Bank."' Tmh Start" 
Is a registered agent ol Key Bank** 

Thorton.CO, NO VISA 

application fee. Cash deposit b 

optional, but not rehired. 

CALL Fnsh SUtl 



OUR GUARANTEE. 

"Resh Slaif provides a 100 s ,; Guarantee 
to the Issuing bank for your card. 



"Fresh Start" 

CREDIT ASSOCIATION, INC. 

708-356-5796 

30S S. Granada, Ltndenhunt 
HOURS: Mon.-Frl. 9-6 



non-league foe Grant Jan. 7 
while Warren is off to Jan. 
10 at Mundelein. The Blue 
Devils host Zion-Benton 
Jan. 11 while Antioch is at 
North Chicago. 

Antioch opened the Rock- 
ford tourney with a 65-48 
win over Streator, fell to 
Guilford 76-67, Rockford 
Jefferson 61-59 and Ottawa 
57-55. 

Warren lost to Danville 




A HAPPY AND HARMONIOUS 
NEW YEAR TO ALL! I 

Start Your New Year 
Off On A Good Note 

•Sales •Rentals 

•Service •Starter Packages 
•Lessons •Gift Certificates 

Open Mon.-Sat. 



WC 

SOME 



(708) 223-7979 



FOR BETTER HEALTH FOR YOU AND YOUR- FAMILY 
INSTALL A WHOLE HOUSE HUMIDIFIER 




IS YOUR HOME THIS DRY? 



Eliminate parched, harmful dry air in your home or condominium and sun 
enjoying total indoor air comfort with an Aprilaire® humidifier. 

The controlled mouture added by the safe, flow-through Aprilaire system 
ends itchy skin, scratchy throats , static electricity and other irritations. At the 
same time, it protects your home and furnishings from 
the d am ages caused by dry air. 

Welcome the proven benefits of an Aprilaire 
humidifier into your home. And remember.there's 
an Aprilaire humidifier for every type of heating 
system. 

For installation or more informal) on , contact us 
today. 




For o braoth of frvsh ait 



FOR 44 YRS WE'VE SOLD THE BEST AND 

SERVICED THE REST! 

1948-1992 

OTIUER'S AREA HEA3TOG, m T C. 

112 Center Street, GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

m 



61-58, topped Providence 
St Mel 68-58 and Alton 
59-56 to claim the 
consolation title. 
Against Danville, Craig 
Shelton was Warren's leader 
with 13 points, 11 coming 
when Warren built a 10- 
point early lead. But 
Danville rallied, starting 
with an 19-11 second-quar- 
ter run. 



Against St, Mel, the Blue 
Devils found themselves 
not up by 10, but down by 
that margin. Shelton led 
the Warren rally, as he fin- 
ished with 12 points. Ben 
Bongratz and Andy Dyakon 
led the attack in the middle, 
with 22 and 12 points, re- 
spectively. 

For Antioch, center Chris 
Malec scored in the 20's 



twice - 28 against Jefferson 
in the 61-59 loss. 

Coach Dresser praised the 
continued strong play of 
guards Jeff Woods and Tim 
Fox. Woods had 21 against 
Ottawa. 

"The kids played well in 
the final 1:30 and we al- 
most got it into overtime," 
Dresser said. 



Blood Pressure screening 

The Lake County Health Dcpt. offers blood pressure testing for 
adults at no charge to Lake County residents. 

Testing will be held at the following times and places. No ap- 
pointment is necessary. 

Fox Lake State Bank, 55 E. Grand Ave., Jan. 3, 1 1 a jn. to 1 p.m. 

Avon Twp. Office, 433 E. Washington, Round Lake Park, Jan. 7, 9 
to 10:30 a.m. 

Antioch Public Library, 757 Main Strcetvenue, Jan. 8, 2 to 4 p.m. 

Consumers Co-op Credit Union, 1210 S. Lake Street, Mundelein, 
Jan. 14, 10 a.m to 12 p,m. 

North Chicago Public Library, 2100 Argonne Dr., Jan. 14, 3 to 
4:30 p.m. 



,~*4r<-» 



REE SPINAL EXAM 



ft 

ft 

ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



$ 



150 



Pius. This Coupon Good For ] 
Any Chiropractic Service. 

X-Rays And Treatment. | 



Expires 1/31/92 



New patients only 1 per patient. Bring in coupon. _ _ _j 



WHERE DO YOU HURT? 

HEAD 
NECK 

S1IOULOEH 

CM ESI 
MM 




Danger Signal! ol Pinched Nirvos: 

t, Headaches. Dirtiness, Lets ol Sleep 
2. Neck Pain. TlgM Muscles. Spasms 
3 'ShouUei Pain, Tain Down Arms, Numbness In Hindi 
4, Pain Between Shoulders. Dillicull Siealhlng 
' 5. lowei Back rah, Hip Pain. Pain Down Legs 




GALL TODAY 
740-2800 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 
CHIROPRACTIC 

314 W. Rollins Rd., R.L.R. 
(next to Eagle Foods) 



Dr. Scott G ; Reiser 

Most insurances accepted including 
workmens compensation & personal injury 



■ I ■ aMM 



> Going Out Of M 

w ^BUSINESS! n " 

Soon Closing Forever 



iTJa 



Savings Up T 



VISA 



(708)223-0211 (708)587-1299 
24. Hour Service 



Suits 

Sport Coats 
Sweaters 



• Slacks 
^Outerwear 

• Shirts' 



• Top Coats 

• Rain Coats 



Ties 



For the Safety of you and your family have your Furnace Cleaned 
and Serviced for the coming Winter Heating Season.' : 



Top Name Brands Like 

\ r 

Christian Dior 

- 

| Sansabelt 

• London Fog And Regulars 

^•Society Brand 



i 



To All Sections 
of I he 
Head and Faee**^ 
ToThroat-.^' 
To Uppof Lungs-— . 
To Heart— 
To Lungt— , 
To Stomach 
ToUvw 
ToGati Bladder— 1 
To KWnoy»_J 
To Owls* 
ToBowell 
To Append!? 
To Gonhali 
To Bladder 
To Lower Urribt— 




CHIROPRACTIC CENTER OF GRAYSLAKE 

Some complaints commonly treated with successful results: 



■ NECK PAIN 

■ BACK PAIN 

! HEADACHE 

> NUMBNESS IN ARMS 



SCIATICA - 

STIFF BACK & NECK 
- HIP & LEG PAIN 
>SPINE DEGENERATION 



■ SHOULDER & ARM PAIN 
-PINCHED NERVE 

■ NUMBNESS IN LEGS 
■SPORTS INJURIES 



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28 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 



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Basketball squads relax before loop wars heat up 



1 



Yes, Christmas vacation does come in 
basketball season, giving coaches and 
players alike a chance to turn the tape ma- 
chine on and visit relatives. 

"We'll take some time off. We've been 
practicing or playing Monday through 
Saturday for six days a week since Nov. 
11. Well take four or five days off," Lake 
Zurich Coach Doug Cook said 

The Bears are 6-7 after a Wheeling tour- 
nament which saw them finish in 15th 
place. After three losses, the Bears topped 
North Chicago 49-45 for the not-to-finish 
in-last honor. 

Mark Okolita led the way with 18 
points, coming off a two-point outing in a 
64-44 loss to Lake Park. 

"The key was we stayed within our game 
plan throughout and were able to dictate 
tempo," Cook said. 

Like Lake Zurich, Grayslake Coach Greg 
Groth is giving his forces a few days off 
until the practice resumes Jan. 3. Groth 
will be visiting family in Ohio. 

Most teams are off until non-conference 
contests Jan. 7 or league play resumes 
Jan. 10. 

Holiday tourneys, although no one came 
home with the big trophy, were parti- 
cilarly good to Carmel and Mundelein, 
notched thirds at Kankakee and Jacobs, re- 
spectively. Warren won the consolation 
title at Pontiac while Libertyville was 
fourth and Stevenson fifth at Wheeling and 
Johnsburg sixth and Wauconda seventh at 
Marengo. 

Some thoughts as the miles rolled up: 

Stevenson's Chris Coleman certainly 
put on a show in Stevenson's 56-53 loss 
to Maine South, the Pats' first, Coleman 
entertained the crowd with a steal at half- 
court resulting in one slam and another 
steal and dunk combination in the third. 
quarter. 

Stevenson (10-1) seemed to have a com- 
fortable 10-point lead in the third, but 
Maine South trimmed it to seven at the 
start of the fourth and then held Coleman, 
who had. 24 points for the game, dunkless 
and shut down the Pats offense. 

"We did not play real well and Maine 
South came to play as a team. In the third 
quarter, we got up by 10, but did not play 
with any intensity in the fourth," Steven- 
son Coach Ken Johnson said. 

Stevenson bounced back with an 87-63 
win over Maine West and captured fifth 
with a 93-61 triumph over Elk Grove. 
Coleman had 22 and Eric Roth 14 in the 
fifth-place game. 

Libertyville (7-7) appeared to be a team 
which could sneak up on a tourney title 
when it handled Elk Grove 75-58. 

The Wildcats fell to the host team 77-71 

in the semis and fell to Maine South 67- 
52 in the third place game. 

"In the first half, we had four turnovers 
in the first two minutes of the game. We 




were trying to force it inside instead of 
being patient. In the second half we got 
smart and started playing some intelligent 
basketball," Libertyville Coach Max 
Sanders said. 
Center Tim Simon and forward Gregg 




by Steve Peterson 

Wheeler had 19 points each. "Matt 
(Sriver) and Matt (Kosowski) had a 
couple of great assists and that made it 
easier for us," Wheeler said. 
Wheeler, a senior, recalled the Wildcats 
used the same tactics that they had used a 
season before. "It was the same thing we 



used against bigger players in last year's 
tournament We were able to box out," he 
said. 

Coaches were thrilled with teams' efforts, 
while in some cases, even with a W, the 
manner in which it was achieved left 
mentors jumping out of their coaching 
boxes. 

"Our guys did not come after it. We had 
spurts where we played well, but overall it 
was not a good team effort," Mundelein 
Coach Dennis Kessel said after a 73-63 
win over Stcinmetz. 

Kyle Kessel, who bettered the 20 
point mark in all tourney games, had 22 
against Steinmctz. Steinmetz is winless 
this year and the bench could be mistaken 
for part of the crowd as it has eight play- 
ers. 

The Mustangs (6-5) did come back to 




Slamming one home 



Stevenson's Chris Coleman is the center of all eyes in the Wheeling gymnasium 
as he dunks one against Maine South. Coleman entertained fans at Wheeling 
Hardwood Classic with several NBA-type moves. Despite Coleman's dunks and 
24 points, Maine South won 56-53. Stevenson went on to finish fifth. - Photo by 
Joe Shuman. 



play another close game against Round 
Lake. When the two teams were at Hamp- 
shire, they split last-second games, with 
Cory Kirking winning for MHS last year. 
This time, Round Lake fell behind by 11 
but rallied and led. But when Mundelein's 
Thad Miller went to the free-throw line, he 
missed one on purpose, grabbed the re- 
bound and MHS had the third-place trophy 
with the 67-65 win. 

The No. 22 proved to be to Kessel's lik- 
ing again, as the soph hit that tally. 
Round Lake (8-5) gave tourney cham- 
pion Conant fits in a 65-58 semifinal 
loss. Round Lake rallied from four and 
five-point deficits before a Scott 
Voliing basket gave the Panthers a one- 
point lead with 6:26 left But that would 
be Round Lake's last score from the field 
until the waning seconds. Conant built up 
a 10-point lead in that stretch, taking ad- 
vantage of Round Lake foul trouble. 
Vinnie Lira, Round Lake's speedy 
guard, injured an ankle in the quarter. 

"We played real well, but we could not 
get over the hump. We did not handle their . 
pressure. They were tall and pressed us in 
crucual situations with six or seven differ- 
ent changes," Round Lake Coach Bob 
Ward said. 
Grant's highlight was a 61-58 win over 
Steinmetz at Jacobs. 

The holiday tourneys are often as inter- 
esting on the sidelines as the dozens of 
games. For example, Mundelein score- 
keeper James Ackley had a chance to 
meet with an old coaching chum, Keith 
Vernon. Vernon helps run the Wheeling 
tourney. Both were grade school coaches 
in the 1960s. 

Good and bad: you can't beat the pizza at 
the Wheeling Hardwood Classic, but can 
something be done about the commeri- 
cials. Corporate sponsors are a necessity 
these days, but do we need so many plugs? 
A thought: look for Round Lake's Scott 
Ellen wood and Carmel's Jermaine 
Williams to be the leading three-point 
shooters at end of the season. Both had 
games with count 'em, five, three-point- 
ers. If they don't make it to the state's 
three-point shooting contest, how about a 
one-on-one from 'treyland'? 
Ouch I: Richmond-Burton is looking for 
its first win of the year and is the only 
area team still without a W. One of the 
Rockets' losses was a 100-50 doubling at 
the hands of East Troy in the Burlington 
(Wis.) tourney. It's hard times for Coach 
Scott Brunswick & Co., who are just a 
year removed from a Big Eight Conference 
championship team. 
Ouch II: Johnsburg trashed Huntley 65- 
17, no that was no typo, at Marengo's 
tournament Yes, Richmond and Huntley 
did meet and it was Richmond's lone win. 
Huntley also provided Wauconda with its 
two wins. 



Lancer women will face stiff tourney challenges 



by STEVE PETERSON 

Lakeland Newspapers 

College of Lake County's women's bas- 
ketball team has used intensity on defense, 
and talent from players from successful 
high school programs to win 10 straight 
games this winter. 

The Lancers will have a chance to see just 
how far they have progressed when the 
team competes at the College of DuPage 
(COD) tournament in Glenn Ellyn Jan. 3 
and 4. The Lancers face fellow unbeaten 
Kankakee at 8 p.m. Jan. 3. Should the 
Lancers win, they would face the Kish- 
waukce-COD winner at 2 p.m. Jan. 4. The 
third-place game will be at noon Jan. 4. 

"It will be a good test for us. They've 
been in the national tournament for the 
last four years. I expect they will have a 
quality team" CLC Coach Don Zeman said 
of Kankakee. 



The Lancers, before taking a rest for the 
holidays, downed Joliet 69-41 in the latest 
romp. 

The fast 10-0 start has forced the Lancers 
to readjust their goals. CLC was 8-17, 9- 
16 and 13-15 in Zeman's earlier seasons. 

"I expected us to" get off to a good start 
but I would be lying to say I expected a 
10-0 start," Zeman said. 

Zeman knew early on that this year's 
group is far ahead of the previous three 
teams. "I assumed at the start our depth 
was going to be our strength. All nine 
players bring something positive to every 
game. Team defense has been the biggest 
surprise - how seven newcomers and two 
holdovers have come together," Zeman 
said. 

Because of the talent, Zeman has found 
himself doing more coaching and less 
teaching, "We are not starting from 



scratch. They already know how to take a 
charge and how to screen and roll," Zeman 
said. 

CLC is paced in scoring by sophomore 
Caryn Alexander. Alexander, from High- 
land Park, averages 19.1 points a game. 
Stephanie Seier, a Carmel graduate, is at 
14 points a game. Seier is CLC's threat 
from the outside and she had five in a 22- 
point show against Joliet 

"Every team we play knows she is an 
outside threat. She makes things easier for 
everyone else," Zeman said. 

Freshman Melissa Webster's strength is 
rebounding, where she contributes 12.5 
rebounds a game. "She has been a real 
strength at both ends of the floor. I 
thought rebounding would be a real weak- 
ness but she has taken over as our re- 
bounding leader," Zeman said. The Warren 
High standout still possesses that intense 



smile. 

Rachel Smith joined Alexander as a 
sophomore. "She has improved so much 
and plays under control. She allowed our 
whole offense to be under control," Zeman 
said. Smith, a Wauconda graduate, is aver- 
aging 5.5 assists and steals a game. She 
had six steals in the win over Joliet. 

The CLC mentor expects to continue to 
rotate among three players the fifth start- 
ing spot. Shcri Ernst can come off the 
bench and score, Lisa Kristofferson from 
Mundelein bolsters the inside game and 
Jenny D'Andrca's speciality is defense. 

How did the- Lancers go from a few wins 
a year, to just under .500 to a perfect start? 

"I did more recruiting. It took a couple of 
years to know the coaches and know which 
girls to talk to. I did a lot of communica- 
tion through the mail. The recruiting has 
paid off," Zeman said. 



uan/3, 1992 



Januarys, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 29 






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Lakeland's SPORTS 



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ahoviak takes R&R after first pro season 



by GREG MILLER 

Lakeland Newspapers 

A year older and wiser — and hope- 
fully healed — Grayslake's Scott Sta- 
hoviak will continue his baseball educa- 
tion when the world-champion Minnesota 
Twins open their training camp in March. 

Stahoviak, a Carmel grad, spent the 
summer picking up more tools of the 
trade with the Class A Vascilla Oaks in 
the California League after being drafted 
by the Twins last June. 

"1 learned a lot in all aspects of my 
game," Stahoviak said. "And, I learned 
how to cook too." 

Stahoviak bypassed his final year at 
Creighton University to enter the Twins' 
organization, but the liming was perfect 
— 1991 was a great year for him and the 
Omaha, Neb. university. 

Creighton posted a 51-22 mark and 
earned a berth in the College World Se- 
ries, while Stahoviak registered numbers 
that made him the Missouri Valley Con- 
ference MVP and a first-team all-Ameri- 
can. In 72 at-bats, Stahoviak hit .449 
with 74 RBI's and 13 homers. 

Basketball Results 



Stahoviak joined Vascilla at midsca- 
son. His addition and some other rein- 
forcements helped the Oaks go from last 
to second place in the second half. 




Scott Stahoviak 

"I started out pretty well but then I had 
a bad slump," Stahoviak said. "They 
changed my balling stance, and it took a 
while to get used to it. I was up to about 
.290 when I left — I was down to around 



At Jacobs 
Mundclcin 68, Grant 64 
McHcnry 51. Round Lake 48 
Grant 61, Slcinmelz 58 
Round Lake 46, Jacobs 45 (2 OT) 
Gary-Grove 72, Mundclcin 71 
Gary-Grove 63, Grant 54 
Mundclcin 73, Stcinmclz 63 
Conant 65, Round Lake 58 
Jacobs 71, Grant 52 (5lh place) 
Mundclcin 65, Round Lake 63 
(3rd place) 
At Marengo 
Riv Brook 77, Wauconda 66 
Marengo 67, Johnsburg 47 
Johnsburg 67, Huntley 15 
Wauconda 55, hunt;lcy 47 
(7th place) 

Stillrnan V 66, Johnsburg 58 
(5th place) 
At Wheeling 
Maine S 81, N Chicago 61 
Stevenson 95, Dccrfield 73 
Ubcrtyville 73, St, Edward 59 
Wheeling 61, Lake Zurich 47 
Dccrfield 55, N Chicago 50 
Libcrtyvillc 75, Elk Grove 58 
Maine S 56, Stevenson 53 
Schaumburg 56, N Chicago 55 
Lake Park 64, Lake Zurich 44 
Stevenson 87, Main W 63 
Wheeling 77, Libcrtyvillc 71 
Lake Zurich 49, N Chicago 45 



(15th place) 

Stevenson 93, Elk Grove 61 

(5lh place) 

Maine S 67, Libcrtyvillc 52 

(3rd place) 

At Rockfdrd 

Antioch 65, Slrcaior 48 

Rock Guilford 78, Antioch 67 

Rock Jefferson 61, Antioch 59 

At Kankakee 

Carmel 64, Tildcn 44 

Carmel 83, Rantoul 65 

Kankakee 67, Carmel 65 

Carmel 55, Corliss 51 (3rd place) 

At Luther North 

St Rita 61, Gray slake 35 

Notre Dame 71, Gray slake 48 



Schurz70, Grayslakc 52 
At Ponttac 

Danville 61, Warren 58 
Warren 64, St. Mel 54 
Warren 57, Pontiac 48 
Warren 59, Alton 56 
(consolation) 



.210. It was a minor adjustment — noth- 
ing really drastic." 

Stahoviak is still in the process of 
learning a new position. He was moved 
from first to third last year at Creighton 
and stayed at the hot corner in Vascilla. 
He's fell in love with the challenge. 

"It's a lot different with wooden bats 
and better burners. There are guys who can 
flat-out run. There are a lot of adjust- 
ments, but I like third a lot better than 
first — it's so much more exciting." 

Stahoviak throws right but bats from 
the left side of the plate, which should 
make his major-league stock go up. 

"When I originally picked up a bat, I 
batted right-handed, but my dad taught me 
to bat left-handed. There aren't many left- 
handed hitting third basemen — even in 
the history of baseball — and there are 
never as many left-handed pitchers as 
right-handed." 

A recurring throwing-arm elbow prob- 
lem ended Stahoviak's first minor-league 
season with 10 games left on the sched- 
ule. He's already had two operations for 
calcium deposits and bone spurs and 
chips, but this time, an irritated flexor 
muscle was the ailment. 

"It was a long season coming straight 
from college. It was too much on the el- 
bow. I'm going through rehab, and it feels 
100 percent better." 

Stahoviak said his new coaches em- 
phasize learning. 

"The coaching's a lot more instruc- 



tional. The Creighton coaches were great 
— the best in the country — but you do 
learn a lot coming from college to the 
pros. 

"From what I heard, they were real 
pleased with the way I played." 

Some clubs' farm systems include dif- 
ferent leyels within the designated classes. 
By virtue of his college credentials, Sta- 
hoviak jumped over the rookie leagues and 
"low" Class A to "high" Class A ball. 
(Kenosha, Wis. is the Twins' "low" Class 
A squad.) He'll reach for a higher rung 
when practice opens in Fort Myers, Ha. 

"If I do well in spring training in 
March, I will be in double A." 

That would land him a spot on the 
Orlando Sunrays' roster. 

Meanwhile, Stahoviak will use the fa- 
cilities at Creighton to further his elbow 
rehabilitation and keep his skills honed. 
He said he'd like to have his 6-foot-5, 
225-pound frame abridged to 215 pounds 
by the start of the season. 

And finally, just what are the alle- 
giances of a young man raised as a White 
Sox fan but drafted by the Twins? 

"I'm the biggest White Sox fan. It's 
real difficult being drafted by the Twins 
and then have to cheer against them (the 
Sox). 

"It's nice to see yourself drafted by the 
team that won the World Series, but you 
know they have a good group of guys up 
there, and you'll have trouble breaking 
in. 



Godwin gains college football award 



00 



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NEW 



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Offensive tackle Ken 
Godwin of Mundelein, has 
received the coaches' award 
for his performance on the 
Rose-Hulman Institute of 
Technology football team. 

Godwin, a senior electrical 



engineering major, is the 
son of Harold and Robin 
Godwin. He is a graduate of 
Carmel High School. 
"Ken was an inspiring 
force on this year's team. 
He was a leader - on and off 



the field," Rose-Hulman 
football Coach Scott Dun- 
can said. 

Godwin started nine games 
for the Engineers during 
the 1991 season. He earned 
honorable mention all-Indi- 



ana Collegiate Athletic 
Conference honors while 
being the team's captain on 
offense. In 1990, he started 
10 games, helping the of- 
fense average 392 yards a 
game. 






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Life Skills Series 

Join us for the Life Skills Series of lectures on issues facing 
people in today's world. These educational lectures are free 
and so is the parking! Refreshments provided. 

Twenty ways to grow younger while growing older: 
Stress management for the eiderty 

January 15, 1992 7-8 p.m. 
Presented by- 
Leah Pendarvis, Ph.D. 
Staff Psychologist 
Saint Therese Medical Center 

Ever wonder how to add years to your life and life to your years? This 
program is about being loved and thinking positive; enriching your minds 
and changing the world. Dr. Pendarvis will present her own philosophy on 
aging, namely, how to specialize in no regrets. 

Dr. Pendarvis is a clinical psychologist on the staff of Saint Therese Medical 
Center and is in private practice in Grayslake. 

For more information or to register, call ASK-A-NURSE* 
at 244-5900. 



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Antioch 

395- 1 089 



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A Division of Franciscan Sisters Health Care Corporation 



2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 
Telephone 708.249.3900 



30 Lakeland Newspapers 



January 3, 1992 




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Lakeland's COUNTY NEWS 








„ __. - - ----- - 



olo Bog volunteers honored for service 




n December 12, 33 
Jcated individuals were 
(>rcd for their volunteer 

jices at Volo Bog State 

ral Area. Together, 
contributed " nearly 

. hours to the unique 
ftois Department of 
conservation site located in 
Jjfesidc, IL. 

fecial recognition was 

ft to Chester Mikucki 

was named Volo Bog's 

nicer of the Year for 

Mikucki leads 

[cd lours of Volo Bog 

al weekend days each 



month, works in the site's 
reference library and serves 
on the Board merchant ma- 
rine devoted almost 300 
hours to Volo Bog SNA in 
1991 and over 700 hours 
since beginning as a 
volunteer in 1988. 

For his services, Chet 
received a Certificate from 
the Illinois Department of 
Conservation, a Centurian 
Award plaque from Volo 
Bog SNA recognizing his 
contribution of over 100 
hours to the site, as well as 
a plaque in honor of 
.Volunteer of the Year. 



The following individu- 
als received certificates 
from the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Conservation for 
contributing 50 or more 
hours each to Volo Bog 
Stale Natural Area in 1991: 

Julianne Anderson, Pat 
Barker, Marge Blake, 
Margie Casserly, Jerry 
Chapman, Linda Curtis, 
Mary Jo Dusek, Kris 
Fitzsimmons, Dan Haller, 
Bill Harding, Olga Jenkins, 
Esther Larson. 

Bill Liggin, Margo 
MiMc, Pamela Otto, Kathy 
Phei„n, Howard Phillips, 



Mary Schwartz, Bill An- 
dresen, Bruce Behan, Larry 
Davidson, Keith Elms, 
Tom Foss. 

Bob Hueckstacdt, Rose 
Kirwan, Nancy Liggin, 
Dave Miller.Pete Moroz, 
Stan Tragarz, Wendy 
Travcrs, Richard Wend, and 
Ed Kirwan. 

Volunteers contribute in 
numerous ways to the pro- 
gramming and general op- 
erations at Volo Bog SNA. 
Trained naturalists lead 
lours of Volo Bog for indi- 
viduals and small groups 



on Saturdays and Sundays 
at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. 
Youth program naturalists 
lead environmental educa- 
tion programs including 
Bog Life tours for approx- 
imately 1000 school chil- 
dren each spring and fall. 
Others lead bird walks, 
ecology hikes, astronomy 
sessions and special work- 
shops. Some advise site 
staff on computer matters 
while still others monitor 
bird nesting programs, 
maintain the site reference 
library, assist with the de- 
velopment of the herbarium 




(plant collection) or super- 
vise crews of public service 
workers for projects in 
construction and maintc-. 
nance. 

Without such a diverse 
group of dedicated 
individuals, Volo Bog 
would be able to offer only 
a fraction of its present 
programs and services. The 
staff of Volo Bog State 
Natural Area wishes to ex- 
press its sincere thanks and 
appreciation to a devoted 
group of special people; 
Volo Bog Volunteers. 



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rotect household pets from unplanned parenthood 



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The pet responds to 
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Owners interested in 
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animal who is owner 
oriented, happier and 
healthier. The owner's life 
is made easier. 

The age lo spay a female 
is about six months, before 
sexual maturity is reached. 
Males should be neutered at 
seven to eight months. 
Call your veterinarian for 
more details. 



<*j 



For questions concerning 
the health of your pet ask 
Dr. "K." Send questions to: 
Ask Dr. "K,"c/o Lakeland 
Newspapers, P. O. Box 
268, Grayslake, IL 60030. 




I? 



i3 



S§3 $ 



#$ 



ft QUALITY PET FOODS AT LOW PRICES 



I 



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j •: Puppy Kindergarten 

J 2 mo.- 5 1/2 mo. 

| -Beginners Obedience 6 mo. & up 

P ^Advanced beginners 

I •'Competition 



Merry Christinas from y 

B.C. DOG TRAINING, INC. * 

"Where we train you to train your dog" 

WE OFFER U 

• Conformation-Beginners & Advanced 

• Tattooing 

• Problem Solving 

• Counseling 

• Retail Products 



'24.25 

'13.25 

«3i.75 

j*l 20# Eukanuba M7.25 

* 20/r lams Cat '21.95 



40# lams Chunk 
20# lams Chunk 
40# Eukanuba . 




IpS All our classes aro limited in size lor greater attention and help with exercises. Call tor Class Schedule 

f (708) S66-19BO 

N ifbedience]f lEoiifir matlon | 

Bring this Ad in for a 1 0% discount on classes 



*m*t 



In January & February! 



, I 






to 



•& 




40# Nulromax 

20#Nulromax- 

20# Max Cat 

40# Science Diet Canine Maint. 
20# Science Diet Canine Maint. 
20# Science Diet Feline Maint. .' 

35# Btl Jac Select 

18# Bit Jac Select 



'25.50 
'15.49 
'21.95 *u» 
•30.50 " 
•17.25 
'24.35 
•27.25 & 
'15.00 ^ 



* 



* 
* 
* 



« * 



FREMONT CENTER FEEDS, INC 

22438 W. Erhart Rd., Mundelein 

(1 blk. W. of Rt. 60 on Erhart Rd. 

near Peterson Rd.) 

__„4798) 223-0204 ^ 

*$** * * s * ^ 



» 



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January 3, 1992 



Lakeland Newspapers 31 



nuary3, 1992 



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OFFERING THE ADVANTAGE OF QUIET COUNTRY LIVING, 

CONVENIENCE OF QUALITY SHOPPING, 

FINE SCHOOLS AND AN ABUNDANCE 

OF RECREATION JUST MINUTES AWAY. 



YOU'VE SEEN THE REST, IT'S TIME 

TO SEE THE BEST 

IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 



Conveniently Located 



North Avenue 



Aritioch 

Manor 

Apartments 

' ' 'y C5 ■'"'* 



fio 

V'O: 

■■&■■■ 



£4 




[Downtown' 
Antiocn 



Route 173 



0949 Today 








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A Place You Can Call Home! 






Hwy, 83 & North Avenue 

Antioch, IL • 395-0949 
EveningSLBy- Appointment 



Good Cents Is A Well 
Built Energy 'EfHeiont .. 
Home 



j 32 Lakeland Newspapers 



Januarys, 1992 



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